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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
One of the last of the Hollywood giants gets the profile treatment on The Disney Channel tonight."Roseanne" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Hard to think of "Roseanne" as a direct descendant of "Leave It to Beaver," but it is. In tonight's "homage" to its sitcom predecessors, shot in glorious black and white, Roseanne's a harried housewife, Dan a harried businessman and Jackie a harried (and wacky) neighbor. ABC."Wings" (9: 30 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The series' principals remember when they were kids -- and what they figured they'd grow up to be. Sitcom stars?
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Standing outside his tent pitched on the sidewalk by a defunct downtown diner, Jimmy Stewart III wondered aloud where he'll sleep after city officials force him to leave Friday morning. The city is set to remove Stewart, 54, and a couple dozen other homeless people from their temporary homes on soggy mattresses along the Fallsway at makeshift campsites between parking spaces under the Jones Falls Expressway and inside tents huddled against the closed Hollywood Diner. It will be the fifth time in four years the city has forced him to move, Stewart said.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
Tom Hanks' latest movie, The Da Vinci Code, opened May 19, a day before Jimmy Stewart's birthday. (Stewart was born in Indiana, Pa., on May 20, 1908.) Entertainment writers have often called Hanks today's Jimmy Stewart. That comparison has never looked shakier than it does right now. Stewart's most famous suspense films were obsessive and erotic fables for Alfred Hitchcock, leagues away from Ron Howard's stodgy, cautious The Da Vinci Code. Indeed, throughout his career, Stewart drew inspiration from a score of strong, diverse directors, from Ernst Lubitsch to Otto Preminger.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
If he was always billed as "James" Stewart, why did movie lovers know him as Jimmy? James jibed better with his ethical authority and physical height (6 feet, 31/2 inches), but Jimmy suited the actor's down-home casualness and emotional transparency, his soft-shoe timing and his uncanny knack for spontaneous comedy- drama. He let audiences see right through him. Stewart could be a master of ingratiating wool-gathering. But he could also cut and sting. Few have approached the rage and anguish Stewart fearlessly plumbed in films such as "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946)
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By Kenneth R. Clark and Kenneth R. Clark,Chicago Tribune | October 14, 1994
INDIANA, Pa. -- George Bailey, embattled protagonist of the Christmas classic "It's a Wonderful Life," was rescued in his hour of despair by a guardian angel named Clarence.Jay Rubin would settle for an angel of any name or persuasion, just as long as it comes with deep pockets and a generous nature.Like the savings and loan institution threatened with bankruptcy in the 1946 Frank Capra movie starring this western Pennsylvania town's most famous native son, a museum long planned in honor of Jimmy Stewart is woefully short of funds.
NEWS
July 5, 1997
GREAT ACTORS never appear to be acting. Jimmy Stewart so comfortably played his roles that movie audiences could easily convince themselves that he really was Jefferson Smith ("Mr. Smith Goes to Washington") or George Bailey ("It's a Wonderful Life") or Charles Lindbergh ("The Spirit of St. Louis") or Elwood P. Dowd ("Harvey"). Once Mr. Stewart appeared on the screen with his western Pennsylvania drawl and occasional stammer, no matter the scene or subject, the audience could relate.As distinctive as was this tall man with the immediately recognized voice, he had the uncanny ability to make people see him as one of their own. He was the quintessential American, whether playing a cowboy, a baseball player, a musician, a reporter, or an amiable imbiber whose best friend is an invisible 6-foot rabbit.
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By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
A watershed moment comes in "It's a Wonderful Life" when Jimmy Stewart's character, George Bailey, learns that his brother Harry has gotten married and has been offered a job out of town. These events will shatter George's own lifelong dreams of escape. In the next seconds, Stewart's face undergoes an astonishing series of transformations, most of it conveyed by his eyes.First is dumbfounded surprise at his brother's good fortune, followed swiftly by the shadow of despair as George calculates his loss.
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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2001
In The Majestic, the indisputably gifted Jim Carrey shows the side of him that just wants to be loved - the Riddler on Ritalin, the Mask unmasked. And it turns out to be stultifying. In the latest sentimental pile-driver from director Frank Darabont (The Green Mile), Carrey plays Peter Appleton, a Hollywood screenwriter fired from his studio in 1951 after he is accused of being a Communist. He gets in his car, drives it off a bridge to avoid a furry creature, crashes, and washes up near a small Northern California town that accepts him as a long-lost local hero.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 4, 1997
Anyone who doesn't realize Hollywood lost one of its giants when Jimmy Stewart died Wednesday should plop down in front of the TV set for a few hours today and take in at least part of AMC's Fourth of July Jimmy Stewart marathon (6 a.m. today-6: 30 a.m. tomorrow).Unfortunately, none of the pictures he made with Frank Capra or Alfred Hitchcock are being shown, but there are still plenty of wonderful films, including some of his best westerns.The day kicks off with "You Gotta Stay Happy," then continues with "Broken Arrow" (7: 45 a.m.)
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | March 1, 1994
THIS story actually belongs to Christmas. That's the season when the 1947 movie "It's a Wonderful Life" shows up endlessly on every TV station. But Glimpses discovered recently that when the movie premiered in Baltimore 47 years ago, both Jimmy Stewart, now 85, and director Frank Capra, who died in 1991, came here to help promote it and open the theater where it played.Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1947, was a big night at the new Town Theater, south side of Fayette between Howard and Eutaw streets. (The theater, long since abandoned, still stands.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
A film series spotlighting the work of Joel and Ethan Coen, whose No Country for Old Men dominated February's Academy Awards, will unspool Wednesdays through June in the Mountcastle Auditorium of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Pre-Clinical Teaching Building, 725 N. Wolfe St. The series kicks off Wednesday with No Country for Old Men, starring Josh Brolin, Javier Bardem, Tommy Lee Jones, Woody Harrelson and Kelly Macdonald in the sordid tale of...
FEATURES
December 8, 2006
WHAT YOU SAY I enjoy several holiday movies as part of my Christmas traditions. A Christmas Carol and A Christmas Story are musts while doing last-minute wrapping and waiting for the kids to go to sleep. A Charlie Brown Christmas, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Year Without a Santa Claus are great to watch cuddled up with the kids in the big chair. But my all-time favorite holiday film is It's a Wonderful Life. The reason is the story shows the beauty of family love. Family is what makes the shopping, cooking, wrapping, decorating, card-writing -- all the details of Christmas -- worth it on that day. Katie Cole, Kingsville It's a Wonderful Life with Jimmy Stewart has always been my favorite holiday story year after year.
NEWS
June 3, 2006
George Allen "Slim" Aarons, 89, a photojournalist who traveled the world to capture the essence of the rich and famous and made a career out of -- in his own words -- "photographing attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places," died Tuesday of a heart attack and stroke at a veterans home in Montrose, N.Y. During a career that spanned more than five decades, Mr. Aarons photographed many famous faces of the 20th century, including Humphrey...
NEWS
June 2, 2006
WORLD Powers agree on Iran proposals World powers said yesterday that they have agreed on a set of "far-reaching proposals" to entice Iran to suspend its enrichment of uranium, which could be used for nuclear weapons, and to punish Tehran if it refuses. pg 1a Quake death toll continues rise With as many as 500 people dying each day from injuries that they suffered during Saturday's earthquake in Indonesia, the death toll from the earthquake has surpassed 6,200, and it is likely to continue to increase.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
Tom Hanks' latest movie, The Da Vinci Code, opened May 19, a day before Jimmy Stewart's birthday. (Stewart was born in Indiana, Pa., on May 20, 1908.) Entertainment writers have often called Hanks today's Jimmy Stewart. That comparison has never looked shakier than it does right now. Stewart's most famous suspense films were obsessive and erotic fables for Alfred Hitchcock, leagues away from Ron Howard's stodgy, cautious The Da Vinci Code. Indeed, throughout his career, Stewart drew inspiration from a score of strong, diverse directors, from Ernst Lubitsch to Otto Preminger.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2005
The courtroom drama Anatomy of a Murder opens tonight in the recently renovated Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park, marking the award-winning Bowie Community Theatre's 38th season. "The theater group wanted to do a mystery, and I prefer to do plays of substance over just a story line," said BCT director Estelle Miller. "I decided if we could find a cast of 16 men for this play that were characters to say something, I would direct it." Anatomy of a Murder was first a book, published in 1956 and written by Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker, under the pen name Robert Traver.
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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 15, 1990
THE CAPITOL Hill newspaper Roll Call ran a fake full page advertisement Thursday for a new holiday season movie.The copy says, "First there was 'The Magnificent Seven,' then 'The Dirty Dozen,' now the U.S. Senate in conjunction with the U.S. League of Savings Institutions presents a Constituent Services Inc. production of 'The Keating Five.' "The casting, by Roll Call's Craig Winneker and others on the staff, is inspired. There's Ed Harris as John Glenn, of course. He played Glenn in "The Right Stuff."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Standing outside his tent pitched on the sidewalk by a defunct downtown diner, Jimmy Stewart III wondered aloud where he'll sleep after city officials force him to leave Friday morning. The city is set to remove Stewart, 54, and a couple dozen other homeless people from their temporary homes on soggy mattresses along the Fallsway at makeshift campsites between parking spaces under the Jones Falls Expressway and inside tents huddled against the closed Hollywood Diner. It will be the fifth time in four years the city has forced him to move, Stewart said.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2004
Dorothy Smith, a devoted wife and mother who embraced the role of family historian, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Copper Ridge Institute in Sykesville. The longtime Baltimore resident was 84. Dorothy Williams was born near Evian, France, in Divonne-les-Bains. She was raised by her maternal grandparents, who were direct descendants of King Louis IX of France. Her father, Col. Roger Williams III, a career Army officer, was a descendant of Roger Williams, the founder of Rhode Island.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and By Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
I own a piece of Bedford Falls -- 320 Sycamore, to be precise. Here, George Bailey, his wife and four kids lived a wonderful life, although he didn't realize it until it nearly slipped through his grasp. Now, I must decide whether this purchase was a wise investment -- or a boondoggle prompted by my subconscious response to Sept. 11. Besides, the place needs work. The Bailey home and three other buildings synonymous with the 1946 classic film starring Jimmy Stewart are available from Walgreens, the nation's largest drugstore chain, as part of its first It's a Wonderful Life illuminated village series.
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