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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 13, 2000
Jimmy Page & the Black Crowes Live at the Greek (TVT 2140) There was a time when any garage band worth its salt knew at least a couple Led Zeppelin songs - if not an entire album's worth. It wasn't just that Zeppelin was, in its prime, one of the most popular bands in the world, or that Zep's guitar, bass and drums lineup put the group's repertoire within reach of garage-band instrumentation. Led Zeppelin cranked out some of the most memorable riffs in heavy rock, and any band capable of covering "Whole Lotta Love," "The Lemon Song" or "Sick Again" was allowed - if only for a moment - to share in that glory.
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By BEN SISARIO and BEN SISARIO,New York Times News Service | November 5, 2007
The press agent in London was getting the same question all day: Which finger was it? The digit in question belonged to Jimmy Page, guitar magus of Led Zeppelin. And according to a statement issued Thursday afternoon, it had been fractured the previous weekend, forcing the group to delay its megaticket reunion concert in London by two weeks, to Dec. 10. "Led Zeppelin have always set very high standards for ourselves," Page said in the statement, "and we feel that this postponement will enable my injury to properly heal, and permit us to perform at the level that both the band and our fans have always been accustomed to."
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 19, 1998
Robert Plant has never been the sort given to worrying about radio play. He certainly didn't give the matter thought when he was in Led Zeppelin.After all, Zep often didn't even bother releasing singles, but tracks like "Kashmir" and "Stairway to Heaven" still got on the air.But Plant does hope that "Walking Into Clarksdale" (Atlantic 83092, arriving in stores Tuesday), his new album with guitarist Jimmy Page, gets a fair hearing on radio. Because "Walking Into Clarksdale" is the first full album of new material these two have recorded since Led Zeppelin - which ruled the rock world for 11 years and 10 albums - broke up some 19 years ago."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 13, 2000
Jimmy Page & the Black Crowes Live at the Greek (TVT 2140) There was a time when any garage band worth its salt knew at least a couple Led Zeppelin songs - if not an entire album's worth. It wasn't just that Zeppelin was, in its prime, one of the most popular bands in the world, or that Zep's guitar, bass and drums lineup put the group's repertoire within reach of garage-band instrumentation. Led Zeppelin cranked out some of the most memorable riffs in heavy rock, and any band capable of covering "Whole Lotta Love," "The Lemon Song" or "Sick Again" was allowed - if only for a moment - to share in that glory.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
If you made the mistake of watching Fox's "Roseanne: An Unauthorized Biography" last night, you've got two chances to watch the real Roseanne tonight and get the taste of Denny Dillon's hideously bad portrayal out of your mouth. There's also an unofficial reunion on TV tonight, with Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad appearing on separate shows, and an official one, with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, formerly of Led Zeppelin, doing an "Unledded" concert on MTV.* "The Cosby Mysteries" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 1998
* = Poor** = fair*** = good**** = excellentGodzillaThe Album (Epic/Sony Music Soundtrax 69338)Like the movie ad says, Size Matters. And just as you can't have a summer blockbuster film without larger-than-life special effects, you can't have a summer blockbuster soundtrack without a generous serving of superstars.Star power is not a problem for "Godzilla: The Album." Not only does it boast a raft of monster acts, including the Wallflowers, Foo Fighters, Jamiroquai and Rage Against the Machine, one track even pairs hip-hop auteur Puff Daddy with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page -- a match-up almost as awesome as when Godzilla squared off against Mothra.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 24, 1995
Although they're meant to evoke the glories of the past, reunion tours more often end up reminding us of just how much time has passed since the breakup, and how much further popular music has moved along. At best, they offer a certain nostalgic kick, but has any reunion ever rekindled the original flame?Sure. In fact, that's precisely what Jimmy Page and Robert Plant did during the two-night stand at the USAir Arena that ended last night.Even though the tour isn't billed as the re-launch of Led Zeppelin -- and, in fact, does not include original Zep bassist John Paul Jones -- that's what most fans came expecting.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 23, 1990
Jason Bonham was only a member of Led Zeppelin once, filling in for his father, the late drummer John "Bonzo" Bonham, at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary Concert last year. But even a single day's tenure is membership enough for some Zep fans. Bonham said earlier this year that whenever he tours with his own band, he's faced with kids "on stage yelling 'Get the Led Out' . . ."What a following!"Having grown up around the band, the young drummer ought to be used to Zep-mania in all its manifestations.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1995
TC New York -- Jimmy Page and Robert Plant do like to talk.Given their historic reticence around the press -- an understandably tight-lipped response to all the years in which Led Zeppelin had to endure both sneering reviews and sensationalist profiles -- this is not their most celebrated trait. But here they are, hunkered down in a posh suite at the Essex House on a cool, October afternoon, nattering away about everything and anything -- including the fact that they're really too tired to be doing all this talking.
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By BEN SISARIO and BEN SISARIO,New York Times News Service | November 5, 2007
The press agent in London was getting the same question all day: Which finger was it? The digit in question belonged to Jimmy Page, guitar magus of Led Zeppelin. And according to a statement issued Thursday afternoon, it had been fractured the previous weekend, forcing the group to delay its megaticket reunion concert in London by two weeks, to Dec. 10. "Led Zeppelin have always set very high standards for ourselves," Page said in the statement, "and we feel that this postponement will enable my injury to properly heal, and permit us to perform at the level that both the band and our fans have always been accustomed to."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 14, 1999
In the world of English rock guitar gods, all roads lead back to the Yardbirds.In 1963, the young combo began playing clubs around London, and immediately earned a reputation, both for its devotion to the blues and for a stunning young guitarist named Eric "Slowhand" Clapton (the nickname being an ironic acknowledgment of his speed on the fretboard).Two years later, Clapton left the group, disgusted at how pop-friendly the Yardbirds had become. Desperate for a replacement, the group turned to Jimmy Page, then the hottest session guitarist in England.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 1998
* = Poor** = fair*** = good**** = excellentGodzillaThe Album (Epic/Sony Music Soundtrax 69338)Like the movie ad says, Size Matters. And just as you can't have a summer blockbuster film without larger-than-life special effects, you can't have a summer blockbuster soundtrack without a generous serving of superstars.Star power is not a problem for "Godzilla: The Album." Not only does it boast a raft of monster acts, including the Wallflowers, Foo Fighters, Jamiroquai and Rage Against the Machine, one track even pairs hip-hop auteur Puff Daddy with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page -- a match-up almost as awesome as when Godzilla squared off against Mothra.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 19, 1998
Robert Plant has never been the sort given to worrying about radio play. He certainly didn't give the matter thought when he was in Led Zeppelin.After all, Zep often didn't even bother releasing singles, but tracks like "Kashmir" and "Stairway to Heaven" still got on the air.But Plant does hope that "Walking Into Clarksdale" (Atlantic 83092, arriving in stores Tuesday), his new album with guitarist Jimmy Page, gets a fair hearing on radio. Because "Walking Into Clarksdale" is the first full album of new material these two have recorded since Led Zeppelin - which ruled the rock world for 11 years and 10 albums - broke up some 19 years ago."
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 24, 1995
Although they're meant to evoke the glories of the past, reunion tours more often end up reminding us of just how much time has passed since the breakup, and how much further popular music has moved along. At best, they offer a certain nostalgic kick, but has any reunion ever rekindled the original flame?Sure. In fact, that's precisely what Jimmy Page and Robert Plant did during the two-night stand at the USAir Arena that ended last night.Even though the tour isn't billed as the re-launch of Led Zeppelin -- and, in fact, does not include original Zep bassist John Paul Jones -- that's what most fans came expecting.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1995
TC New York -- Jimmy Page and Robert Plant do like to talk.Given their historic reticence around the press -- an understandably tight-lipped response to all the years in which Led Zeppelin had to endure both sneering reviews and sensationalist profiles -- this is not their most celebrated trait. But here they are, hunkered down in a posh suite at the Essex House on a cool, October afternoon, nattering away about everything and anything -- including the fact that they're really too tired to be doing all this talking.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
If you made the mistake of watching Fox's "Roseanne: An Unauthorized Biography" last night, you've got two chances to watch the real Roseanne tonight and get the taste of Denny Dillon's hideously bad portrayal out of your mouth. There's also an unofficial reunion on TV tonight, with Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad appearing on separate shows, and an official one, with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, formerly of Led Zeppelin, doing an "Unledded" concert on MTV.* "The Cosby Mysteries" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 14, 1999
In the world of English rock guitar gods, all roads lead back to the Yardbirds.In 1963, the young combo began playing clubs around London, and immediately earned a reputation, both for its devotion to the blues and for a stunning young guitarist named Eric "Slowhand" Clapton (the nickname being an ironic acknowledgment of his speed on the fretboard).Two years later, Clapton left the group, disgusted at how pop-friendly the Yardbirds had become. Desperate for a replacement, the group turned to Jimmy Page, then the hottest session guitarist in England.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brooke Nevils | November 2, 2006
Black Crowes One of the few contemporary bands to share the stage with Jimmy Page, the Rolling Stones, Aerosmith and the Who, the Black Crowes are playing Rams Head Live on Tuesday. Since its 1990 debut album Shake Your Money Maker went multiplatinum, the band has gone through a series of breakups and reformations, including lead singer Chris Robinson's marriage to and recent separation from actress Kate Hudson. The show begins at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 23, 1990
Jason Bonham was only a member of Led Zeppelin once, filling in for his father, the late drummer John "Bonzo" Bonham, at the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary Concert last year. But even a single day's tenure is membership enough for some Zep fans. Bonham said earlier this year that whenever he tours with his own band, he's faced with kids "on stage yelling 'Get the Led Out' . . ."What a following!"Having grown up around the band, the young drummer ought to be used to Zep-mania in all its manifestations.
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