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Jimmy Carter

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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 13, 1998
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. -- Former presidential candidate and Christian Coalition founder Pat Robertson has an interesting theory about the next presidential election."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
I can't believe how much talk about the Texas border crisis I've heard on cable news the last two weeks without any mention of the Mariel boatlift of 1980. This is textbook for what I mean about TV news -- from the network and cable level on down -- being hopelessly short on context and any sense of even recent American history. No wonder we are such an addled nation that thinks everything that comes along is the biggest, newest, baddest or best thing ever. No wonder we are such an easily confused and jangled bunch.
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NEWS
September 27, 2005
A COUPLE OF WHOPPER STORMS, some really bad poll ratings and growing panic at the gasoline pumps can prompt a president to some pretty odd behavior. Who would've thunk we'd ever see George W. Bush, former oilman and darling of the industry, reprising Jimmy Carter's national appeal for fuel conservation? Yet there was our conserver-in-chief at the Energy Department yesterday, talking about curbing nonessential travel and peak-hour electricity use, while encouraging carpooling and (gasp!
NEWS
December 13, 2013
If there has been an administration in the history of this country with a more muddled, incompetent, directionless foreign policy than that of the current administration, I am not aware of it. President Barack Obama makes Jimmy Carter look like Winston Churchill. Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, Libya, North Korea, Mali, you name it. Unmitigated disasters again and again and again. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 9, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Jimmy Carter has come out sniveling. Writing in The Washington Post, he airs his disgust with the current administration's handling of international affairs -- starting with its supposed "abandonment" of interest in human rights and extending to its support for Israel. Mr. Carter, as you may not recall since he cast quite a small shadow as president, made "human rights" the foundation of his foreign policy. No longer would we judge nations by whether they were on our side or with the communists.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 24, 2013
In some important ways, the last month or so has seen some impressive advances for President Barack Obama. Under ordinary circumstances, his success so far at staring down Syrian dictator Bashar Assad over chemical weapons and then his rebuff of the House Republicans' demand to defund his health-care insurance law would be recognized as political triumphs. Instead, the president finds himself on the defensive because of the botched rollout of "Obamacare. " Ironically, the earliest indications that enrollment for the insurance was not going smoothly were overshadowed by the dismal and reckless effort of the law's bitter foes to kill it. The tea party-driven decision to hold the executive branch hostage by balking at passing a budget and raising the federal debt limit was a classic case of stepping on one's own most advantageous story - the technological failure of the Obamacare rollout.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | September 6, 1998
I CAN THINK of few prospects less appealing than being treated to a recitation of Dan Burton's sleepovers. Yet that intelligence seems imminent. Word is widely about that this avidly unsought information will soon surface in Vanity Fair magazine, and if not there then in other, as-yet unnamed publications.There is suddenly a run on the sex life of the Republican chairman of the House's Government Reform and Oversight Committee, which has been investigating Democratic political fund-raising.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 21, 1994
ATLANTA -- Even now that he is helping make U.S. foreign policy, even now that he is stopping war on the wing, Jimmy Carter still gets that jilted feeling from the Clinton administration.And the worst of it is, he signals that he is being treated shabbily by someone he brought into the State Department, Warren Christopher, a man he once called "the finest public servant I ever have known.""Rosalynn and I have discussed this a lot, it means a lot to us," he said yesterday, sitting in his office at the Carter Center ."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2000
"An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of my Rural Boyhood," by Jimmy Carter. Simon & Shuster. 356 pages. $26. Twenty-four years ago, Jimmy Carter arose from the obscurity of a one-term governor of Georgia to become the 39th president of the United States, and the nation seemed a bit taken aback at what it had done. After all, for more than a century the South had loomed in the collective imagination as an exotic place, defined chiefly by its novels -- from the syrupy sentimentality of Margaret Mitchell, to the ribald satire of Erskine Caldwell, to the brooding mysticism of William Faulkner.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Tymeerah Butts wasn't alive while Jimmy Carter lived in the White House. But the 26-year-old Dundalk woman can tell visitors to her future home that a former president framed out a front window. About 300 volunteers, including Carter, renovated houses in Baltimore and Annapolis Tuesday as part of a weeklong project with Habitat for Humanity, the home-building organization that owes its visibility to Carter, who became heavily involved in its operations after his presidency ended. Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, are travelling to Maryland; Washington; Birmingham, Ala.; and Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., to work on 86 homes, a number that commemorates his 86th birthday, which he celebrated Friday.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 24, 2013
In some important ways, the last month or so has seen some impressive advances for President Barack Obama. Under ordinary circumstances, his success so far at staring down Syrian dictator Bashar Assad over chemical weapons and then his rebuff of the House Republicans' demand to defund his health-care insurance law would be recognized as political triumphs. Instead, the president finds himself on the defensive because of the botched rollout of "Obamacare. " Ironically, the earliest indications that enrollment for the insurance was not going smoothly were overshadowed by the dismal and reckless effort of the law's bitter foes to kill it. The tea party-driven decision to hold the executive branch hostage by balking at passing a budget and raising the federal debt limit was a classic case of stepping on one's own most advantageous story - the technological failure of the Obamacare rollout.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
In reading The Sun's editorial pages on Oct. 4, I couldn't help but think that the editorial board, in bowing to the extreme left wing base, has been shoveling a huge amount of "stuff. " Take, for example, the editorial, "Congress: Do your job," where you take issue with the Republican majority in the U.S. House of Representatives over their distaste for the Obamacare bill passed by Democrats, without a single Republican vote. What you never seem to discuss is that under our Constitution, the House holds the purse strings of this nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2013
The four-story brownstone near Washington's Lafayette Park is one of the most exclusive hotels in the world. There's a fireplace in the master bathroom, and the thread counts on the sheets is high enough to rival the Four Seasons. And only four people can get reservations to stay there right now - possibly because the coverlet bears the presidential seal, and there are accommodations for the Secret Service in the basement. The townhouse on West Jackson Place is the residence where Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and both George Bushes stay when they are in Washington on official business.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 8, 2012
As Mitt Romney continues his quest for the silver bullet that will wipe out all the deep reservations about his qualifications to be president, the man who still owns the job is demonstrating every day why incumbency gives him a major advantage in striving to keep it. Last week, all other news was smothered by the first anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden, capped by President Barack Obama's secret and dramatic flight to Afghanistan. The American television networks accommodatingly aired his live press conference from Bagram Air Force Base, with U.S. troops providing the ideal backdrop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
When Walter Hill was flipping through the first 40 pages of the science fiction/horror script that became "Alien," he considered it turgid, a snooze. "I thought it was just terrible," said Hill, who co-wrote and co-produced the movie with his partner, David Giler. It barely diverted Hill from watching Jimmy Carter's acceptance speech at the 1976 Democratic convention, which was on his TV in the background. Then Hill got to the now-infamous "chest-burster scene," where a creepy little critter — with a head like a slimy, tiny sperm whale — explodes from the chest of a spaceship's executive officer and traumatizes the crew.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Tymeerah Butts wasn't alive while Jimmy Carter lived in the White House. But the 26-year-old Dundalk woman can tell visitors to her future home that a former president framed out a front window. About 300 volunteers, including Carter, renovated houses in Baltimore and Annapolis Tuesday as part of a weeklong project with Habitat for Humanity, the home-building organization that owes its visibility to Carter, who became heavily involved in its operations after his presidency ended. Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, are travelling to Maryland; Washington; Birmingham, Ala.; and Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., to work on 86 homes, a number that commemorates his 86th birthday, which he celebrated Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
I can't believe how much talk about the Texas border crisis I've heard on cable news the last two weeks without any mention of the Mariel boatlift of 1980. This is textbook for what I mean about TV news -- from the network and cable level on down -- being hopelessly short on context and any sense of even recent American history. No wonder we are such an addled nation that thinks everything that comes along is the biggest, newest, baddest or best thing ever. No wonder we are such an easily confused and jangled bunch.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - Two weeks after the Iranians seized 66 American hostages in November 1979, a reporter asked Hamilton Jordan, the White House chief of staff, what would happen if the crisis continued into the presidential campaign of 1980. "We just can't let that happen," Jordan replied. In fact, it was clear then that neither President Jimmy Carter nor his political advisers believed there was any realistic possibility that the situation in Tehran would become an influential factor in the campaign.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 18, 2009
Tomorrow is the national holiday celebrating the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. Atlanta, the birthplace and resting place of King, is a great destination for exploring the rich cultural heritage of African-Americans. The Sweet Auburn Historic District, along Auburn Avenue, features several preserved sites reflecting the civil rights movement and King's legacy. 1 Honor history : The Martin Luther King National Historic Site is one of the most-visited attractions in Atlanta. Here you can take a guided tour of the two-story house where King was born and see the tomb where he was laid to rest.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,paul.west@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
WASHINGTON - In the strange world of politics, the worse your party does, the better its top job looks. The chairmanship of the Republican National Committee grew a lot more attractive recently, after John McCain failed to win the presidency and the percentage of voters who call themselves Republicans fell to the lowest level in nearly 30 years. Republicans are without an obvious leader - Sarah Palin's celebrity notwithstanding - and the job of RNC chairman, which comes up in January, is a valuable perch for someone with national ambitions.
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