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By Knight-Ridder | November 22, 1991
Jimi Hendrix didn't live to see it, but the late rocker finally got a star yesterday on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. The guitar wizard, who died of a drug overdose in 1970 at age 27, is sandwiched on Hollywood Boulevard between the stars of actor Art Carney and director Fred Zinneman."
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By Jennifer K. Dansicker | April 19, 2012
For most aspiring musicians, the guitar is the symbol of cool. And for most angst-ridden teenagers all over the world, learning how to play the rock' n' roll catalyst is not always a simple task. That is why many Harford County residents have chosen longtime rock band frontman and guitarist-turned-teacher, Jim Bowley, as their teacher. Raised by a single mother who worked as a banker, Bowley, 45, graduated from Archbishop Curley High School, an all-boy school in Baltimore, in 1984 and then received a Bachelor of Science degree from Towson University in music education in 1988.
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By Patrick MacDonald and Patrick MacDonald,Seattle Times | September 23, 1990
SEATTLE -- The talk to the high school media class was going fine. The kids were attentive; they laughed at my jokes and posed sharp questions.But the mood changed when a girl asked about my favorites among rock stars I've met. Mentions of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, B. B. King and Ray Charles created hardly a ripple.Then I said, "I'm really glad I got to spend some time with Jimi Hendrix." A gasp went up from the students, so loud it startled me. Suddenly there was electricity in the room -- a buzz of excitement and questions from every side.
NEWS
March 5, 2011
Touch a screen at the new Fort McHenry Visitor and Education Center and the sounds of "The Star- Spangled Banner," eight different versions, spring forth. Some feature singers who belt out the words, "the land of the free. " Others are instrumentals, some jazzy, some martial, and two more are waiting in the wings. To make it to Fort McHenry, these performances had to be serious and timely. "We ruled out any goofy versions," said Fort Superintendent Gay Vietzke, "or ones where the artists were simply seeking publicity.
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By J.D. Considine | June 4, 1998
The Jimi Hendrix ExperienceBBC Sessions (MCA 11742)During a radio appearance in 1967, Jimi Hendrix admitted that he much preferred playing live to working in a recording studio. "It's very hard, like, warming up [in a studio]," he explained to a BBC interviewer.Such a statement probably sounds ridiculous to today's Hendrix fans. After all, Hendrix packed so much studio experimentation into the albums "Axis Bold As Love" and "Electric Ladyland" that it seems inconceivable that he ever had trouble "warming up" to such work.
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By Los Angeles Times | September 27, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Janis Joplin got the feature-film treatment in the fictionalized "The Rose" (1979). Jim Morrison's life will be dramatized in Oliver Stone's upcoming movie about The Doors. But a feature film about legendary rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix -- who died in 1970 at 27 -- is still without voltage.Alan Douglas, who supervises the production of the Hendrix music catalogs and related merchandising (including the upcoming concert video of Hendrix's last major concert at the Isle of Wight Festival)
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
"Yeah, brother! What's happening?"It is Jimi Hendrix, high and giddy on the Monterey Pop Festival stage. It is June 1967, long enough ago for the concert film to have become part of pop culture's endless reel. There's Jimi, nervous, 24 years old, throaty-voiced, hair wild even for the time. You know the lasting image: Hendrix on his knees, summoning fire from a flaming Stratocaster guitar.He was one of the last acts of a three-day show. The headliners were Johnny Rivers, the Association, The Mamas and The Papas, performers who "just dropped off the face of the earth" after Monterey, says Joel Selvin, author of "Monterey Pop."
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 12, 1993
SHAQ DIESELShaquille O'Neal (Jive 41529)On the face of it, Shaquille O'Neal's debut album seems like just another sports-celeb vanity project. After all, with production by Erick Sermon and Def Jeff, plus cameos by the Fu-Schnickens and Phife from a Tribe Called Quest, "Shaq Diesel" is blessed with enough first-rate help that it would sound good even if all O'Neal did was dribble to the beat. So here's the surprise -- O'Neal raps well enough to make the all-star support unnecessary. It helps that he's got a strong voice and enough rhythm to easily go one-on-one with his guests.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Noel Redding, 57, an English musician who played bass in the Jimi Hendrix Experience and made some of the most influential records in rock history, died Monday of unknown causes at his home in the pastoral town of Clonakilty, Ireland. Mr. Redding wrote two Experience songs, "Little Miss Strange" and "She's So Fine," but he is best known for anchoring the pioneering psychedelic sound of the Hendrix albums Axis: Bold as Love, Are You Experienced? and Electric Ladyland. Mr. Redding performed on the hits "Foxey Lady" and "Purple Haze" (and later painted one of his bedrooms purple)
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | April 21, 1995
Truus Bronkhorst, the Dutch dancer and choreographer who appeared in Baltimore in 1993 as part of the Theatre Project's three-year cultural exchange program with the Netherlands, has returned to the city with a new work that spills over with her anger and intensity."
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
Jonny Lang hadn't even been conceived when Jimi Hendrix died. By the time he was learning to play guitar, he'd missed the countercultural icon by more than 20 years. Singer Susan Tedeschi was born about two months after Hendrix died in 1970. Today, they're both accomplished musicians, with several Grammy nominations to their credit (even a win, for Lang). But on Thursday at the Hippodrome Theatre , they won't be playing their songs. They'll be playing Hendrix's. Lang and Tedeschi are two of the performers on the Experience Hendrix tour, a traveling revue-style concert that gathers some of the country's better-known musicians to perform two hours of Hendrix's catalog.
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By Brooke Nevils and Brooke Nevils,Sun Reporter | November 10, 2006
Actors Wood Harris and J.D. Williams, best known as Avon Barksdale and Preston "Bodie" Broadus on the HBO series The Wire, are back on the streets of Baltimore this week, filming another gritty depiction of the city's drug scene. But don't be fooled. It's not The Wire. It's the Hollywood adaptation of A Thug's Life, Baltimore native Thomas Long's debut novel about two partners-turned-rivals in a brutal west-side drug gang, Dogs for Life. 4 Life, the direct-to-DVD movie from Tony Austin, the president of Russell Simmons Music Group, and Baltimore Ravens linebacker Adalius Thomas began filming its Baltimore segments this week, on location at the Sandtown Barber Shop, the Inner Harbor and Federal Hill Park.
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By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
With a whirl of the Groove Wheel, a rotating rainbow of magnified droplets illuminates the backboard in Baltimore Hebrew Congregation's school gym. On stage below, the Flying Eyes tear into an ear-splitting set. As if channeling Jefferson Airplane, this band of confident teenagers has captured a 1960s psychedelic sound with uncanny ease. Fans surge to the front, turn airy pirouettes and twist their arms to the spacy jams. One sweaty young man leaps on stage and does an undulating, double-jointed dance.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 29, 2006
The glitter at the American Visionary Art Museum's 10th Anniversary Gala went beyond the newly installed mirror-mosaic Icarus sculpture, further than the gazillions of reflective discs dangling from table centerpieces set up for the party, and past the glitzy sequins and beads adorning a polka troupe dancing to the Tommy Thomas Trio's tunes. We're talking the glitterati scattered among the 400 guests. Former talk-show host Rosie O'Donnell and South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu were there, for starters.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
Room Full of Mirrors: A Biography of Jimi Hendrix Charles R. Cross Hyperion / 384 pages Rock music was already soaring when Jimi Hendrix touched down on British soil in the fall of 1967. The Beatles had turned the corner into psychedelia, Cream and the Rolling Stones were melding American blues with hard-driving rock, and a serious young guitarist named Eric Clapton was the subject of graffiti declaring him God. Then, at a London club, the little-known Hendrix plugged his guitar into someone else's amplifier, cranked up the volume and let loose with - well, what was that, anyway?
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By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2005
Tommy Goldman's foot taps the floor and his head bobs as his fingers pluck the familiar melody of the Beatles' "Hide Your Love Away" on his guitar. Matt Hutton adds the drumbeat and Louis Weeks' smooth voice echoes an era long gone. The three teens don't own vinyl records, and they were born a decade after John Lennon's death. To them, Woodstock is beyond old-school. Even so, Goldman and his friends spend hours listening to the old albums on CD, jamming to the guitar riffs and reciting the lyrics of the music that made its mark nearly 40 years ago. The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix.
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By Patrick MacDonald and Patrick MacDonald,Seattle Times | September 23, 1990
SEATTLE -- James A. Hendrix, known as "Al" to his friends, is sole heir to the Jimi Hendrix estate, which, according to Forbes magazine, earns about $4 million a year.The elder Hendrix, a retired landscape gardener who is 71, was busy last Tuesday handling calls and doing interviews related to the 20th anniversary of his son's death. He had just completed an interview with one local TV station, and was expecting two more TV crews -- one from another local station and another from CNN.He was worried he was going to be late for a bowling date -- he's an active team bowler, as well as an avid golfer.
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By Brian Byrnes and Brian Byrnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 6, 1996
Dressed to kill in black pants, vest and T-shirt, Josh Smith works the crowd at Cafe Tattoo like a seasoned veteran.As he picks his Fender Stratocaster, his long, curly brown locks flow out of his trademark black Stetson. His mannerisms offer up an eerie resemblance to his late mentor, Stevie Ray Vaughan. Josh jumps off the stage to take an extended solo during Jimi Hendrix's "Machine Gun." The 16-year-old guitar phenom was in town recently with his band, the Rhino Cats, making a stop on his three-month national tour.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 2004
When Mos Def's latest album, The New Danger, dropped in October, I prematurely called it one of the best rap albums to come out this year. I was just excited that the artist had finally released a follow-up to his excellent 1999 debut, the gold-selling Black on Both Sides. But I have lived with the latest CD for the last two months. And I must confess: The New Danger is overly ambitious, full of grand intentions that never really fly. Rock (early Funkadelic, a little Jimi Hendrix) is clearly his style inspiration throughout, but his ambitions nearly swallow him on the record.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2004
This is not an obituary for the Merriweather Post Pavilion. Columbia's woodsy amphitheater - host to every major act (well, not Springsteen or the Stones) - ends its season today with an Incubus concert. We refuse to allow Merriweather to end on that note. The Rouse Co. wants to sell the 37-year-old venue to Howard County as an enclosed theater. Merriweather's management wants the pavilion to remain an open-air venue, and has a contract allowing it to book acts for one more season. But after that, the pavilion's future is up in the air. Its past, however, is rock solid.
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