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NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | October 3, 2006
It's been almost 30 years since James Webb published a provocative essay opposing the integration of women at the Naval Academy titled "Women Can't Fight." But the words have come back - again - to haunt the former Navy Secretary who is now embroiled in Virginia's close and increasingly caustic Senate race.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2011
The cliche view of the high-level public officeholder who would auction off his grandmother to keep his job has taken a severe setback with the announcement by Democratic Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia that he won't seek reelection next year. What makes the decision so noteworthy is that Mr. Webb is a first-termer, elected in 2006 in one of the most widely publicized upsets of that year, when he beat incumbent and then-Republican presidential hopeful George Allen. It is one thing when veteran senators such as Kent Conrad of North Dakota and Joe Lieberman of Connecticut announce they are throwing in the towel.
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NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- If screenwriter Jim Webb were crafting the story of Senate candidate Jim Webb, it would go like this: An anti-war Democrat with a war-hero record and a quirky personal history knocks off one of the Republican Party's fastest-rising stars and helps his party win back the Senate in the 2006 election. "I guarantee you, if I'm elected to the United States Senate, we will raise some hell," Webb told a gathering of Democratic activists in the Northern Virginia suburbs the other night.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | October 3, 2006
It's been almost 30 years since James Webb published a provocative essay opposing the integration of women at the Naval Academy titled "Women Can't Fight." But the words have come back - again - to haunt the former Navy Secretary who is now embroiled in Virginia's close and increasingly caustic Senate race.
NEWS
By Cecil Johnson | February 9, 1997
ROLL OVER, Wyatt Earp, and tell Bat Masterson the news.Of all the men who wore a badge and wielded six-gun and rifle against the forces of lawlessness in the Old West, not one stood as tall in the saddle as Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves.A burly black man -- who chased, apprehended and gunned down black, red, brown and white desperadoes in the Indian territories from 1875 to 1907 -- Reeves was bigger in real life than Marshal Dillon was in fiction. Newspaper accounts of his exploits during those wild and rambunctious days frequently referred to him as "the invincible Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves."
NEWS
By John Harris III and John Harris III,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
Second-hand donated uniforms, routine bus rides to Delaware, Virginia, Washington, Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore, and hard, unforgiving playing fields.These were the conditions in which N. Jerome Edwards and the rest of the Wiley H. Bates High School football team endured during the early 1950s, a period in county athletics thathe says he wouldn't trade for anything in the world."We didn't have any stands back in those days, just a rope dividing the crowd from the field. There would be people lined up four or five deep to see our games.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 14, 2011
The cliche view of the high-level public officeholder who would auction off his grandmother to keep his job has taken a severe setback with the announcement by Democratic Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia that he won't seek reelection next year. What makes the decision so noteworthy is that Mr. Webb is a first-termer, elected in 2006 in one of the most widely publicized upsets of that year, when he beat incumbent and then-Republican presidential hopeful George Allen. It is one thing when veteran senators such as Kent Conrad of North Dakota and Joe Lieberman of Connecticut announce they are throwing in the towel.
NEWS
August 10, 2009
When World War II soldiers returned home, they had an astonishing and fitting opportunity awaiting them - their tuition, books and even a monthly stipend paid in full by the United States government, ensuring that the veterans who risked everything for their country had every opportunity to prosper. There is no more fitting memorial to the Greatest Generation, with apologies to the stirringly beautiful monument recently erected on the National Mall, than a continuation of the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the GI Bill.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | February 5, 1991
The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour -- a bizarre blend of crossover country/pop music, satirical humor and the ubiquitous psychedelia of the '60s and '70s -- was one of television's grandest and most unforgettable experiments. Mr. Campbell has been on the road with a rather uneven reprise of the program -- presented last night as part of the "Meet Us at the Meyerhoff" series.While the performance lacked the best of the show's original peculiarities, the best of its music endures. Songs such as "Galveston" and "Wichita Lineman" (both by composer Jim Webb)
NEWS
April 6, 2009
Maryland spends more than $1 billion a year on locking up criminals, and what do we get for it? Prisons overflowing with low-level drug offenders who keep the revolving door spinning as they continue to commit minor crimes to support their habits. It doesn't have to be this way. That's why Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear recently signed a law sending hundreds of nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. The Bluegrass State expects to cut the $20,000-a-year cost of housing a prison inmate in half by incarcerating minor felons in county jails.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- If screenwriter Jim Webb were crafting the story of Senate candidate Jim Webb, it would go like this: An anti-war Democrat with a war-hero record and a quirky personal history knocks off one of the Republican Party's fastest-rising stars and helps his party win back the Senate in the 2006 election. "I guarantee you, if I'm elected to the United States Senate, we will raise some hell," Webb told a gathering of Democratic activists in the Northern Virginia suburbs the other night.
NEWS
By Cecil Johnson | February 9, 1997
ROLL OVER, Wyatt Earp, and tell Bat Masterson the news.Of all the men who wore a badge and wielded six-gun and rifle against the forces of lawlessness in the Old West, not one stood as tall in the saddle as Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves.A burly black man -- who chased, apprehended and gunned down black, red, brown and white desperadoes in the Indian territories from 1875 to 1907 -- Reeves was bigger in real life than Marshal Dillon was in fiction. Newspaper accounts of his exploits during those wild and rambunctious days frequently referred to him as "the invincible Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves."
NEWS
By John Harris III and John Harris III,Staff writer | February 24, 1991
Second-hand donated uniforms, routine bus rides to Delaware, Virginia, Washington, Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore, and hard, unforgiving playing fields.These were the conditions in which N. Jerome Edwards and the rest of the Wiley H. Bates High School football team endured during the early 1950s, a period in county athletics thathe says he wouldn't trade for anything in the world."We didn't have any stands back in those days, just a rope dividing the crowd from the field. There would be people lined up four or five deep to see our games.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
The LPGA, faced with the loss of the title sponsor for its championship following the recent withdrawal of the Mazda Motor Co., announced yesterday that McDonald's has taken over that role with a multi-year contract.The shift of the championship leaves Bethesda Country Club without an LPGA tournament after six successful years, the last four as the championship site.The 1994 McDonald's LPGA Championship will be held May 12-15 at DuPont Country Club in Wilmington, Del., site of the McDonald's Championship stop on the LPGA Tour the past seven years.
NEWS
By ROBERT TIMBERG and ROBERT TIMBERG,FROM A BOOK PUBLISHED BY SIMON & SCHUSTER ROBERT TIMBERG 1995 | July 2, 1995
The Nightingale's Song, by Sun reporter and editor Robert Timberg, probes a fault line that has haunted American society for more than two decades -- the generational chasm between those who fought a discredited war and those who used money, wit and connections to avoid it. The book weaves together the lives of five U.S. Naval Academy graduates who achieved national prominence during the presidency of Ronald Reagan. They are John McCain and John Poindexter, Class of 1958; Robert McFarlane, Class of 1959; and James Webb and Oliver North, Class of 1968.
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