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Jim Smith

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NEWS
September 17, 1995
The sound engineer for the Eastern Shore program "Radio from Downtown" was incorrectly identified in yesterday's paper. Jim Smith is the "knob-twiddler" for the program.The Sun regrets the error.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A day after former St. Frances basketball star Devin Gray died of a heart attack in Atlanta, longtime Panthers coach William Wells talked about the 1991 Baltimore Catholic League Player of the Year's dedication to the sport. "When I first met Devin, he couldn't hold a ball. By the time he was a senior, I knew he could have been a pro," Wells said Sunday. "He had special talents from the 10th grade on because he could go up and get it. " Gray died in Atlanta on Saturday after suffering a heart attack, according to his cousin Zeke Marshall (St. Paul's)
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NEWS
October 10, 2009
The Sun's Laura Vozzella reported this week that Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith is selling his house in Reisterstown and moving to an apartment in Cockeysville, with the thought of possibly running for state Senate in the 7th District (now represented by Sen. Andy Harris, who is probably going to run for Congress). Really? When Dutch Ruppersberger finished his two terms as Baltimore County executive, there was a strain of thought that saw Congress as a step down - much less the General Assembly.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
TheTowson-based business, administrative and land-use law firm of Smith, Gildea and Schmidt has announced that former county executive Jim Smith, who served two terms as executive and also served as a judge and a County Council member, has joined the firm as an attorney. Smith will serve as a "counsel," assisting in litigation and business matters, administrative law and governmental affairs, according to a release from the firm on Wednesday. Smith will be working with the firm's 11 attorneys, including his son, Michael Paul Smith.
NEWS
April 20, 2003
Suddenly on April 17, 2003, James G. "Jim" Smith of Severna Park, beloved son of George E. and Betty A. (Wilks) Smith and dear brother of Sharon K. Smith and Marion H. Katsereles. Fiance of Deborah Bowen and nephew of Fred Wilks. Friends may call at the family owned Kirkley-Ruddick Funeral Home, P.A., 421 Crain Hwy., S.E., Glen Burnie on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held on Tuesday At 11:00 A.M. in St. Alban'sChurch. Interment in Glen Haven Memorial Park.
EXPLORE
June 1, 2011
TheTowson-based business, administrative and land-use law firm of Smith, Gildea and Schmidt has announced that former county executive Jim Smith, who served two terms as executive and also served as a judge and a County Council member, has joined the firm as an attorney. Smith will serve as a "counsel," assisting in litigation and business matters, administrative law and governmental affairs, according to a release from the firm on Wednesday. Smith will be working with the firm's 11 attorneys, including his son, Michael Paul Smith.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
I enjoyed reading your recent article, "Baltimore County Executive Smith reflects on past, future" (Dec. 3). Looking back over the past eight years, there is a great legacy of accomplishments that Jim Smith will leave behind. In particular, Mr. Smith's stalwart support of the Baltimore County Public Library system deserves special attention. I can think of no other local government leader who has done so much to advance the cause of libraries. Thanks to Mr. Smith's leadership, Baltimore County has new branch libraries in Perry Hall and Arbutus, expanded and improved facilities in Cockeysville and Randallstown, and two new branch locations on the way, in Turner's Station and Owings Mills.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
I read with interest your recent editorial, "Is boring better?" (April 16), which commended Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. and his team for their fiscal prudence during the past eight years. While I agree with your overall viewpoint, I would not describe fiscal prudence as being merely "boring" but rather as simply being a sensible approach to governing. The county's relative financial stability is a testament to the notion that the best functioning government is one that targets the most important priorities and funds them at levels to get the best results.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 21, 2002
With the campaign slogans on their poster-board signs running in the rain, about 50 supporters cheered former Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. yesterday when he became the second candidate to file for Baltimore County executive. Smith, a Democrat, said his platform centers on public safety, improving schools, increasing resident input in government and "renaissancing" older communities. "It's appropriate that we are here today," Smith told his supporters, who huddled under umbrellas as the rain began to pour outside the county courthouse.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
James T. Smith Jr., the Democratic nominee for Baltimore County executive, has rejected a series of televised debates proposed by his Republican opponent, Douglas B. Riley, saying his schedule will not permit it. Smith's campaign manager, Michael P. Smith, said the candidates will have debated a dozen times in community forums before the election in November. Adding the three hour-long debates Riley proposed would not be feasible, he said. But Riley said that the community forums can't properly be called debates: They have not been one-on-one, and they have not provided an opportunity for extended discussion about the candidates' ideas.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
I enjoyed reading your recent article, "Baltimore County Executive Smith reflects on past, future" (Dec. 3). Looking back over the past eight years, there is a great legacy of accomplishments that Jim Smith will leave behind. In particular, Mr. Smith's stalwart support of the Baltimore County Public Library system deserves special attention. I can think of no other local government leader who has done so much to advance the cause of libraries. Thanks to Mr. Smith's leadership, Baltimore County has new branch libraries in Perry Hall and Arbutus, expanded and improved facilities in Cockeysville and Randallstown, and two new branch locations on the way, in Turner's Station and Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Steve Bailey | September 29, 2010
Last week, I filed a request with the Campaign Finance Division of the State Board of Elections to prevent Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. from participating in the current election as a member of a campaign "slate. " Members of a slate are allowed to transfer an unlimited amount of money from one campaign to another if both campaigns are members of the same slate. Friends of Jim Smith, the outgoing county executive's campaign finance account, last reported nearly $1 million in cash on hand.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
I read with interest your recent editorial, "Is boring better?" (April 16), which commended Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. and his team for their fiscal prudence during the past eight years. While I agree with your overall viewpoint, I would not describe fiscal prudence as being merely "boring" but rather as simply being a sensible approach to governing. The county's relative financial stability is a testament to the notion that the best functioning government is one that targets the most important priorities and funds them at levels to get the best results.
NEWS
October 10, 2009
The Sun's Laura Vozzella reported this week that Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith is selling his house in Reisterstown and moving to an apartment in Cockeysville, with the thought of possibly running for state Senate in the 7th District (now represented by Sen. Andy Harris, who is probably going to run for Congress). Really? When Dutch Ruppersberger finished his two terms as Baltimore County executive, there was a strain of thought that saw Congress as a step down - much less the General Assembly.
NEWS
April 16, 2009
While grasshopper-like neighboring jurisdictions happily let their budgets grow last year, Baltimore County chose the ant-like approach of austerity. No cost-of-living adjustments were given to most employees. Certain benefits were diminished. Unhappy teachers picketed in Towson, and some staged work-to-rule protests. This week, County Executive James T. Smith Jr. was the happy one surviving the economic winter in relative prosperity. His proposed $2.56 billion budget, although slightly smaller overall than last year's spending plan, will provide county workers with a cost-of-living increase.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
In a rare display of public candor, several Baltimore County school board members recently lamented having to deal with behind-the-scenes political pressures as they decide what is best for the county's students. The panel's members generally have tried to cooperate with County Executive James T. Smith Jr. in keeping a lid on spending. But this month they balked, and tabled a much-anticipated vote on a Towson school construction project favored by Smith but disliked by many parents. The discussion that preceded the board's decision shed light on its relationship with county leaders - and especially with Smith, who helps set the system's budget and makes recommendations to the governor on who is appointed to the school board.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 3, 2002
BALTIMORE COUNTY swore in its new government yesterday, with historic and uplifting language that will linger through generations to come or the day after tomorrow, whichever comes first. Maybe the highlight was when the new county sheriff, R. Jay Fisher, took the oath of office from Clerk of the Circuit Court Suzanne Mensh. The oath calls for Fisher "to execute the office of sheriff of Baltimore County." What Fisher actually swore was "to execute the sheriff of Baltimore County." Or maybe the rhetorical highlight was that point in the soaring inaugural address of Jim Smith, the new county executive, when he thanked the Overlea Caterers for lunch.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 25, 2006
A copy of Kendel Ehrlich's private schedule came across my fax the other day, with all the stuff you'd expect to fill a busy first lady's day. A speech. A visit to the Ronald McDonald House. A dinner. And in between, some notes showing which state employees were baby-sitting the kids. From 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. one day - Monday, May 2, 2005 - it says "House coverage," meaning Government House staff watched the Ehrlichs' two young sons. The next day, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., it says, "Liz covering."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 22, 2007
Want to get out of jury duty? Take up smoking. U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz has suggested keeping smokers off the jury in the Tommy Bromwell RICO case. His concern: Jurors stepping outside the courthouse for smoke breaks might overhear conversations among all the spectators and journalists swarming around the high-profile trial. "It's just a potential risk. It's just something to think about," Motz told me. Motz said he got the idea from another judge he met at a conference.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. took office four years ago with the task of succeeding an almost larger-than-life political figure whose tenure was marked by growth and prosperity. Supporters say that he has been a success, presiding over hefty budget surpluses and continued redevelopment of older communities. But Republican Clarence W. Bell Jr., a political newcomer, says Smith has run the county government with a top-down style that favors developers. He faults Smith for not doing more to address community concerns such as school crowding.
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