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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 4, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Irish writer, producer and director Jim Sheridan was born in Dublin and began his career as a leader of that city's alternative theater, but New York is central to his life, too. He had his third daughter there as he tried to make a dent in the stage scene, serving as artistic director of the Irish Arts Center and for a short time studying at the New York University film school. With that experience under his belt, he went back to Ireland and became a world-class moviemaker.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 16, 2008
Contemporary triumphs such as Jim Sheridan's In America (2003) and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's A Very Long Engagement (2004) have brought magical thinking into incongruous contexts such as New York's Hell's Kitchen in the 1980s and France during the First World War. In its own artful, scruffy way, 33-year-old Ramin Bahrani's Chop Shop is nearly as strong and moving when it depicts how the power of positive thinking verges on the magical in the psyche of a...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2004
Jim Sheridan once told me that every filmmaker has his "DNA film" -- the one whose genetic coding he keeps wrestling with for the rest of his career. Sheridan's DNA film was his first. Few moviemakers since Orson Welles with Citizen Kane have burst on the scene with as much excitement and authority as Sheridan did in 1989 with My Left Foot. Preparing to introduce and interview him Saturday night at the Maryland Film Festival, I reviewed all of Sheridan's films and was struck by two things: how eclectic his output has become and how so much of it has flowed from that debut.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2005
Terrence Howard has stolen 50 Cent's thunder - and his lightning, and his storm clouds, too - twice in one year. In last summer's Hustle and Flow, a canny show-biz tale of a Southern pimp turned rapper, Howard jet-powered his performance on his character's realization that rap could be his salvation. And in 50 Cent's souped-up, yet diluted attempt to tell his own, similar life story, Get Rich or Die Tryin', Howard, as the hero's best friend, grabs the movie clear away from him. As an actor, 50 Cent can do menace and even a crude version of shy charm, but transcendence is beyond him. In Get Rich or Die Tryin', he tries to take the "come-to-me" attitude of stoic action stars a step further, to "I dare you to come to me."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 9, 1998
Partway through "The Boxer," amateur fighter Danny-Boy Flynn, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, is engaged in a crucial boxing match in Belfast. Not only has the fight become a political metaphor, but it is also a means by which Danny-Boy might seduce a former girlfriend, who sits in the gallery. During the triumphant bout, while the steam and beery cheers of the audience rise, Danny-Boy shoots her a glance captured in a camera flash.It passes in a nanosecond, but that one look -- fierce, glittering, animal -- is a defining moment in "The Boxer," a fine new film from director and co-writer Jim Sheridan.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 16, 2008
Contemporary triumphs such as Jim Sheridan's In America (2003) and Jean-Pierre Jeunet's A Very Long Engagement (2004) have brought magical thinking into incongruous contexts such as New York's Hell's Kitchen in the 1980s and France during the First World War. In its own artful, scruffy way, 33-year-old Ramin Bahrani's Chop Shop is nearly as strong and moving when it depicts how the power of positive thinking verges on the magical in the psyche of a...
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2005
Terrence Howard has stolen 50 Cent's thunder - and his lightning, and his storm clouds, too - twice in one year. In last summer's Hustle and Flow, a canny show-biz tale of a Southern pimp turned rapper, Howard jet-powered his performance on his character's realization that rap could be his salvation. And in 50 Cent's souped-up, yet diluted attempt to tell his own, similar life story, Get Rich or Die Tryin', Howard, as the hero's best friend, grabs the movie clear away from him. As an actor, 50 Cent can do menace and even a crude version of shy charm, but transcendence is beyond him. In Get Rich or Die Tryin', he tries to take the "come-to-me" attitude of stoic action stars a step further, to "I dare you to come to me."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 21, 1994
Yeats, an Irishman himself, said it best: "The worst are full of passionate intensity." So it was in 1974 when the worst of the Irish -- IRA terrorists -- detonated a bomb in a British pub killing five people. And so it was that the worst of the English -- the Security Services -- reacted savagely with laws suppressing individual rights, which permitted them to sweep up in a sloppy but vast net virtually anyone with a brogue.One such was a flaky youth named Gerry Conlon, then 20, a Belfast refugee who was quickly browbeaten into confession and spent the next 15 years in dismal British prisons.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 29, 2003
Oscar-winning filmmakers and the kid next door with a camcorder will be featured equally this weekend, as two film festivals turn Anne Arundel County into the preferred destination for area cinephiles. The second annual Annapolis Film Festival opens Friday night with the Maryland premiere of In America, the latest from Irish writer-director Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot, In the Name of the Father). Earlier in the day, at 9 a.m., the first Maryland Fantastique Film Fest kicks off with a screening of 1933's King Kong, the monster movie to which all future monster movies owe allegiance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARYLAND FILM FESTIVAL | May 2, 2002
Adrift (dir. Tom Curran, USA) Revisiting his family's past in Alaska and Cape Cod, Tom Curran provides a first-person account of loss in an Irish-American family. Adventures of Baron Munchausen (dir. Terry Gilliam, UK) Terry Gilliam's masterpiece will be presented by guest host Colleen Haskell, a Bethesda native and contestant from the first season of Survivor. Americanos (dir. Paul Callahan, USA) A man in his 30s who lives with his mother and spends most of his time at the local bar gets wrapped up in a Cuban cigar smuggling scheme with his wealthy lawyer friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2004
Jim Sheridan once told me that every filmmaker has his "DNA film" -- the one whose genetic coding he keeps wrestling with for the rest of his career. Sheridan's DNA film was his first. Few moviemakers since Orson Welles with Citizen Kane have burst on the scene with as much excitement and authority as Sheridan did in 1989 with My Left Foot. Preparing to introduce and interview him Saturday night at the Maryland Film Festival, I reviewed all of Sheridan's films and was struck by two things: how eclectic his output has become and how so much of it has flowed from that debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | January 4, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Irish writer, producer and director Jim Sheridan was born in Dublin and began his career as a leader of that city's alternative theater, but New York is central to his life, too. He had his third daughter there as he tried to make a dent in the stage scene, serving as artistic director of the Irish Arts Center and for a short time studying at the New York University film school. With that experience under his belt, he went back to Ireland and became a world-class moviemaker.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 29, 2003
Oscar-winning filmmakers and the kid next door with a camcorder will be featured equally this weekend, as two film festivals turn Anne Arundel County into the preferred destination for area cinephiles. The second annual Annapolis Film Festival opens Friday night with the Maryland premiere of In America, the latest from Irish writer-director Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot, In the Name of the Father). Earlier in the day, at 9 a.m., the first Maryland Fantastique Film Fest kicks off with a screening of 1933's King Kong, the monster movie to which all future monster movies owe allegiance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARYLAND FILM FESTIVAL | May 2, 2002
Adrift (dir. Tom Curran, USA) Revisiting his family's past in Alaska and Cape Cod, Tom Curran provides a first-person account of loss in an Irish-American family. Adventures of Baron Munchausen (dir. Terry Gilliam, UK) Terry Gilliam's masterpiece will be presented by guest host Colleen Haskell, a Bethesda native and contestant from the first season of Survivor. Americanos (dir. Paul Callahan, USA) A man in his 30s who lives with his mother and spends most of his time at the local bar gets wrapped up in a Cuban cigar smuggling scheme with his wealthy lawyer friend.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 9, 1998
Partway through "The Boxer," amateur fighter Danny-Boy Flynn, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, is engaged in a crucial boxing match in Belfast. Not only has the fight become a political metaphor, but it is also a means by which Danny-Boy might seduce a former girlfriend, who sits in the gallery. During the triumphant bout, while the steam and beery cheers of the audience rise, Danny-Boy shoots her a glance captured in a camera flash.It passes in a nanosecond, but that one look -- fierce, glittering, animal -- is a defining moment in "The Boxer," a fine new film from director and co-writer Jim Sheridan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 21, 1994
Yeats, an Irishman himself, said it best: "The worst are full of passionate intensity." So it was in 1974 when the worst of the Irish -- IRA terrorists -- detonated a bomb in a British pub killing five people. And so it was that the worst of the English -- the Security Services -- reacted savagely with laws suppressing individual rights, which permitted them to sweep up in a sloppy but vast net virtually anyone with a brogue.One such was a flaky youth named Gerry Conlon, then 20, a Belfast refugee who was quickly browbeaten into confession and spent the next 15 years in dismal British prisons.
SPORTS
March 7, 1991
BASEBALL American League * New York Yankees -- Renewed the contract of Randy Velarde (third baseman).National League * Atlanta Braves -- Agreed to terms with Tommy Gregg (outfielder) on a one-year contract.* Houston Astros -- Agreed to terms with Eric Yelding (shortstop) on a one-year contract.* Montreal Expos -- Agreed to terms with Bob McDonald (pitcher) on a one-year contract.rTC * Philadelphia Phillies -- Agreed to terms with Wes Chamberlain (outfielder) and Charlie Hayes (third baseman)
SPORTS
March 7, 1991
Baseball Atlanta Braves -- Agreed to terms with OF Tommy Gregg (major-league highs of 18 pinch hits and 17 pinch RBI) on 1-year contract.Houston Astros -- Agreed to terms with SS Eric Yelding (.254 with 64 steals) on 1-year contract.Montreal Expos -- Signed P Bob McDonald.New York Yankees -- Renewed the contract of 3B Randy Velarde (.210, 5 HRs, 19 RBI).Philadelphia Phillies -- Agreed to terms with OF Wes Chamberlain (.283 in 46 at-bats) and 3B Charlie Hayes (.258, 10, 57) on 1-year contracts.
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