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Jim Perdue

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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Supermarket shoppers in Maryland can't miss the signature blue-and-gold Perdue label on chicken and turkey in the meat section. The Salisbury-based company is the nation's third-largest seller of poultry. That makes it a prime target of environmentalists, who contend "Big Chicken" is fouling the Chesapeake Bay by not taking care of the animal waste produced by the flocks raised for it on thousands of farms across the Delmarva Peninsula. But in supermarkets with garden sections, consumers are likely to run across another product with links to Perdue, one that even environmentalists like — organic fertilizer, made with manure from some of the fowl grown for Perdue and other companies.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
Supermarket shoppers in Maryland can't miss the signature blue-and-gold Perdue label on chicken and turkey in the meat section. The Salisbury-based company is the nation's third-largest seller of poultry. That makes it a prime target of environmentalists, who contend "Big Chicken" is fouling the Chesapeake Bay by not taking care of the animal waste produced by the flocks raised for it on thousands of farms across the Delmarva Peninsula. But in supermarkets with garden sections, consumers are likely to run across another product with links to Perdue, one that even environmentalists like — organic fertilizer, made with manure from some of the fowl grown for Perdue and other companies.
NEWS
By Wenonah Hauter and Robert S. Lawrence | April 5, 2010
Something's rotten in the state of Maryland, and it's time that a central player in one of the state's biggest industries accepts its fair share of responsibility for the problem. Perdue Farms Inc. is one of the leading poultry integrators operating in the state of Maryland, contracting with hundreds of growers on the Eastern Shore who raise broiler chickens for the company. Perdue controls the production process from start to finish and owns the birds from the hatchery, to the slaughterhouse, to the wholesale distribution and on to the grocery store.
FEATURES
By Elaine Tait and Elaine Tait,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1994
He's 44 but looks at least 10 years younger.The eyes are blue and definitely friendly.Good smile, too.Quiet? A little. But in a nice way.A likable guy, this Jim Perdue.But it takes a tough man to make a tender chicken. Or at least that's what Frank Perdue, Jim's famous father, has been saying for more than 20 years.Frank Perdue made the Salisbury poultry firm -- founded 75 years ago by his father, Arthur Perdue -- the largest poultry producer in the Northeast and the fourth largest in the United States.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
Thank you for staying on top of Maryland's chicken companies for their unfair advantage in our state's politics ( "Perdue's ruffled feathers," Sept. 22). I've been an avid supporter of Food & Water Watch for many years and appreciate their hard work highlighting that not only does Jim Perdue "have a seat at the table," he also has a seat in the governor's mansion. It's time for "big chicken" to pay their fair share. Stephanie Compton, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | June 4, 1997
Item: Perdue Short Cuts Carved Chicken BreastWhat you get: 4 servings (about 2 cups)Cost: $3.79Time to prepare: 0-13 minutes (Serve as is, or try the recipe on the box)Review: "Chef" Jim Perdue has been hawking this a lot on television lately, tempting me to let him slice, season and bake the chicken breast, leaving me to serve it and collect the applause. Trying is believing. My kids ate the lemon-pepper seasoned chicken right out of the package ("This chicken has some taste," said 6-year-old Samantha)
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
Salisbury -- He's got his dad's slightly beaky nose and lean, athletic build. But that's where the similarities end.James A. Perdue, the little-known son of the famous chicken-hawker Frank Perdue, says he is reforging the family poultry company in his own image.His father turned a small family egg business into the nation's fourth-largest chicken seller by telling television audiences he was a "tough man" who made "tender chickens."But Jim Perdue, who took over the chairmanship of Perdue Farms Inc. from his father last July, describes himself as "a tender man."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
— The unassuming farmhouse, with long-vacant chicken coops out back, has occupied a rural stretch of two-lane road for decades. Even now, after a facelift that gave it a fresh white clapboard exterior, bright red shutters and a rebuilt wraparound porch, the house built by Arthur W. Perdue offers no outward clue to its role in the birth of a multibillion-dollar poultry and agribusiness conglomerate. It was there that he started a small egg business in 1920. The rest is Delmarva history.
NEWS
By Wenonah Hauter and Robert S. Lawrence | April 5, 2010
Something's rotten in the state of Maryland, and it's time that a central player in one of the state's biggest industries accepts its fair share of responsibility for the problem. Perdue Farms Inc. is one of the leading poultry integrators operating in the state of Maryland, contracting with hundreds of growers on the Eastern Shore who raise broiler chickens for the company. Perdue controls the production process from start to finish and owns the birds from the hatchery, to the slaughterhouse, to the wholesale distribution and on to the grocery store.
FEATURES
By Elaine Tait and Elaine Tait,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1994
He's 44 but looks at least 10 years younger.The eyes are blue and definitely friendly.Good smile, too.Quiet? A little. But in a nice way.A likable guy, this Jim Perdue.But it takes a tough man to make a tender chicken. Or at least that's what Frank Perdue, Jim's famous father, has been saying for more than 20 years.Frank Perdue made the Salisbury poultry firm -- founded 75 years ago by his father, Arthur Perdue -- the largest poultry producer in the Northeast and the fourth largest in the United States.
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