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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Lenny Moore can hardly attend an NFL function without some gnarly old linebacker wagging his finger at the 78-year-old Baltimore Colts Hall of Fame running back and telling Moore something he already knows. "Lenny," the old-timer will say, "I had a bead on you so many times out there, I was going to knock the living hell out of you. But then I'd look up and, all of a sudden, here comes Jim Parker - and he'd get me first. " Moore will listen, smile and nod. Then he'll look skyward and thank the man upstairs - No. 77, the big lug with the horseshoe on his helmet - for running interference.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
That one of the largest pro football players of his era now owns three restaurants isn't surprising. But how did Roger Brown shed 50 pounds doing it? "My goal now is to sell the food, not eat it," said Brown, 76, who played at Maryland State before starring with the Detroit Lions and Los Angeles Rams in the 1960s. A restaurant/sports bar in Portsmouth, Va., where he lives bears his name. Brown, a onetime 300-pound All Pro defensive tackle, also owns establishments in Williamsburg and Newport News.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 22, 2005
JIM PARKER was one of our great storytellers. Some of the stories were true, and some were embellished for comic effect. Buddy Young used to say, "Parker'll call you up at 2 in the morning, just to make up a story." But here's one that's true: Parker, the man who helped keep John Unitas on his feet for 11 years and opened the holes Lenny Moore scooted through, goes to his grave tomorrow, signaling once more the closing of a long-ago era still remembered with infinite warmth and affection.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
When the Ravens rolled to their second Super Bowl victory, fending off the San Francisco 49ers in the final seconds of the game, the storylines that defined an improbable season all found happy endings. Ray Lewis carried the Lombardi Trophy into the sunset of his long career. Coach John Harbaugh beat his brash little brother Jim. Quarterback and MVP Joe Flacco eliminated any remaining doubts about his big-game talents, and a team whose first owner, Art Modell, died in September won with his memorial patch on their uniforms.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
About a dozen would-be patrons of Jim Parker's Pub stopped by the Northwest Baltimore liquor store yesterday to buy their favorite beverage. What they got instead was news that it had closed.The store, at the corner of Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard for 35 years, shut its doors Sunday night. Owner Jim Parker, who played for the former Baltimore Colts and is in the NFL Hall of Fame, said health concerns led to the decision to close the business that had become an institution.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2005
Blue and white were the dominant colors at Jim Parker's funeral yesterday. He lay in a blue casket, which stood in a sea of blue and white floral arrangements, one a Baltimore Colts horseshoe and another bearing his jersey number, 77. Blue and white were the colors of the old Baltimore Colts. Hundreds of people turned out at New Antioch Baptist Church in Randallstown to pay respects to Parker, a National Football League Hall of Famer who died Monday after suffering from congestive heart failure and kidney disease.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2005
His crushing blocks launched Lenny Moore's runs and saved John Unitas' skin. Jim Parker, the Hall of Famer who anchored the Baltimore Colts' offensive line during the club's glory years, died yesterday of congestive heart failure and kidney disease at the Lorien Nursing Home in Columbia. He was 71. A mainstay on the Colts' National Football League championship teams of 1958 and 1959, Parker was a superb blocker. He carved out paths for runners and guarded Unitas, his stoop-shouldered quarterback, with the ferocity of an embassy Marine.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
In 1957, when he was drafted by the Baltimore Colts, Jim Parker was one of the country's most sought-after football players. He lived up to the hype, earning All-Pro honors eight consecutive seasons and getting inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.He was on the 1958 team that brought the Colts what was then the league's most-coveted prize: the NFL championship.At 6-foot-3, 275 pounds, he was agile for a big guy.But just as the Liberty-Garrison neighborhood where he ran a liquor store for 35 years has lost some of its vitality, so has the man nicknamed "Unitas' Protector" for the pass protection he provided quarterback Johnny Unitas.
NEWS
November 1, 1996
Mr. Memorabilia is offering a reunion show that includes a noon auction of Colts and Orioles memorabilia and autograph-signing from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. tomorrow at Reflections Restaurant, Route 26, Sykesville.Hall of Fame players attending include Ted Hendricks, Raymond Berry, Lenny Moore, Jim Parker, Mike Curtis, Jim Mutscheller and Art DeCarlo.Information: (800) 230-4312.Pub Date: 11/01/96
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | August 13, 1993
Chuck Thompson's induction into the baseball Hall of Fame this month was the highest professional honor, but yesterday's hometown salute to the 71-year-old sportscaster had to be the ultimate personal tribute.Several hundred ordinary citizens turned out on the steps of the Baltimore County Courts Building to cheer as a group of storied Baltimore athletes, including Hall of Famers Brooks Robinson, Johnny Unitas, Artie Donovan and Jim Parker, spoke of their respect and affection for the man who has been the voice of Baltimore baseball and football since 1949.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Lenny Moore can hardly attend an NFL function without some gnarly old linebacker wagging his finger at the 78-year-old Baltimore Colts Hall of Fame running back and telling Moore something he already knows. "Lenny," the old-timer will say, "I had a bead on you so many times out there, I was going to knock the living hell out of you. But then I'd look up and, all of a sudden, here comes Jim Parker - and he'd get me first. " Moore will listen, smile and nod. Then he'll look skyward and thank the man upstairs - No. 77, the big lug with the horseshoe on his helmet - for running interference.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Sitting on stage alongside his aging teammates, having dinner during the Sports Legend Museum induction at Martin's West Tuesday night, 85-year-old Gino Marchetti will chew on this: "It's amazing to me that, after all these years, people are still thinking of us," Marchetti, the Baltimore Colts' Hall of Fame defensive end, said. "I always figured that I'd play football for a few years, go home to Antioch (Calif.) and work in the mill until I turned 65, then go fishing. But, God almighty, the people of Baltimore want to keep promoting us. "The fans were always great in this town.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2008
Even in his first practice as a rookie, Jonathan Ogden stood out. He was tall, lanky and shuffled his feet as he walked. He looked more like an NBA power forward than an offensive tackle. In fact, Ogden played guard his first season as a Raven. He ruined the crescendo of the offensive line, where it grows taller and bigger starting from the center and moving out to the tackles. There aren't too many 6-foot-9 guards. And there might never be another Jonathan Ogden . Often in sports, we compare players, but it's hard with Ogden and any other great offensive tackle.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2005
Blue and white were the dominant colors at Jim Parker's funeral yesterday. He lay in a blue casket, which stood in a sea of blue and white floral arrangements, one a Baltimore Colts horseshoe and another bearing his jersey number, 77. Blue and white were the colors of the old Baltimore Colts. Hundreds of people turned out at New Antioch Baptist Church in Randallstown to pay respects to Parker, a National Football League Hall of Famer who died Monday after suffering from congestive heart failure and kidney disease.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 22, 2005
JIM PARKER was one of our great storytellers. Some of the stories were true, and some were embellished for comic effect. Buddy Young used to say, "Parker'll call you up at 2 in the morning, just to make up a story." But here's one that's true: Parker, the man who helped keep John Unitas on his feet for 11 years and opened the holes Lenny Moore scooted through, goes to his grave tomorrow, signaling once more the closing of a long-ago era still remembered with infinite warmth and affection.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2005
His crushing blocks launched Lenny Moore's runs and saved John Unitas' skin. Jim Parker, the Hall of Famer who anchored the Baltimore Colts' offensive line during the club's glory years, died yesterday of congestive heart failure and kidney disease at the Lorien Nursing Home in Columbia. He was 71. A mainstay on the Colts' National Football League championship teams of 1958 and 1959, Parker was a superb blocker. He carved out paths for runners and guarded Unitas, his stoop-shouldered quarterback, with the ferocity of an embassy Marine.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 10, 1991
Are they beautiful or what?Here is Jim Parker, immortal pro football Hall of Famer with a team called the Baltimore Colts, No. 77 in your program and No. 275 on the weight chart during his svelte playing days.He is standing in his package goods store at Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard yesterday morning with a tray of ham and eggs and grits in front of him that, now that you mention it, he seems to be inhaling.And here is Art Donovan, immortal pro football Hall of Famer with those same Baltimore Colts, No. 70 in your program and No. 270 on the weight chart in his lean and hungry playing days.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
That one of the largest pro football players of his era now owns three restaurants isn't surprising. But how did Roger Brown shed 50 pounds doing it? "My goal now is to sell the food, not eat it," said Brown, 76, who played at Maryland State before starring with the Detroit Lions and Los Angeles Rams in the 1960s. A restaurant/sports bar in Portsmouth, Va., where he lives bears his name. Brown, a onetime 300-pound All Pro defensive tackle, also owns establishments in Williamsburg and Newport News.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
He's got driveways, parking lots and sidewalks that need to be shoveled, plowed and salted. He has snow-clogged vents and roof drains to clear. Bus routes to survey, broken windows to replace, frozen locks to fix and water pipes to inspect - all of it has to be done before schools can be declared ready to reopen. Despite this, Jim Parker is wildly optimistic. Some might call him crazy. "My goal is to have all the schools ready for tomorrow," Parker, the maintenance supervisor for Carroll County public schools, told his boss yesterday morning.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 25, 2000
CHATSWORTH, Ga. - The five commissioners didn't distinguish themselves in the eyes of Murray County voters. They won, then lost a federal grant for bike paths. They allowed, then canceled, then got sued over a contract to expand the courthouse annex. They squabbled, flip-flopped and deadlocked over mobile homes, personnel, planning and more. Commission meetings degenerated into acrimonious affairs. Finally, the good citizens of Murray County had had enough. They threw out the whole bunch, trashed their form of government and replaced the five commissioners with one. Tyson Haynes is "the sole man."
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