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Jim Palmer

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Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Lee MacPhail, a Hall of Fame baseball executive who served as Orioles general manager from 1959 to 1965, died Thursday evening at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 95. Mr. MacPhail, who was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1998, represented the middle of a four-generation baseball dynasty. His father, Larry, was also a Hall of Fame executive. His son, Andy, became the Orioles' top baseball executive from 2007 to 2011 after serving in similar roles for the Minnesota Twins and Chicago Cubs.
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By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
Forty-one years. Until now, that's how long it had been since Baltimore's baseball and football teams thrilled fans by making their respective playoffs in the same year. In January, the Ravens played New England for the AFC championship, and lost to the Patriots. Earlier this month, the Orioles advanced to the American League Division Series, bowing to the New York Yankees. For the first time in decades, Baltimoreans can wear the colors of two teams with equal pride. Orange one day, purple the next.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
We all know singer/songwriter/guitarist/producer Joan Jett loves Rock and Roll; she's proclaimed that plenty of times since her breakout hit in 1982. She also has proclaimed her love for the Orioles for years. It's hard to forget when she donned an Orioles “Jett” jersey in the front row at Yankee Stadium in the 1980s. Well, now the 54-year-old rocker who grew up in Rockville - yes, very appropriate - wanted this generation of Orioles to know how much she's enjoying their resurgence.
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By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
You see the jerseys every time the Orioles play at Camden Yards, often on boys born 20 years after the man shelved his famous mitt - No. 5. Robinson. The combination of that name and that number will always stir the souls of those who watched Brooks Robinson make impossible play after impossible play along the third-base line at Memorial Stadium. But even their children and grandchildren, who never glimpsed his magician's act, have heard the stories of Robinson's kindness - the way anybody could run into him at the mall and receive not only an autograph but a few minutes of genial conversation with a Hall of Famer.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
The major league call-up of Orioles 19-year-old phenom Dylan Bundy to help replenish the club's bullpen after an 18-inning game Tuesday night is a surprise. But it's being made for the right reasons, according to franchise's most heralded and successful pitcher. “It's a prudent move, it's not a knee jerk reaction,” says Jim Palmer, MASN color analyst and the Orioles' Hall of Fame pitcher. “Because of the condition of the bullpen there is a need. It makes sense to me.” Bundy, the club's fourth overall pick in last year's draft, was in the organization's instructional league in Sarasota, Fla., after a season in which he was 9-3 with a 2.08 ERA in 23 starts at three levels.
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Peter Schmuck | September 6, 2012
It all seemed so right. The Orioles long ago chose Thursday night to unveil Cal Ripken's statue at Oriole Park because of the obvious connection to what happened here on the same date 17 years ago, but they could not have known it would be so perfectly timed to coincide with the re-emergence of the team as a late-season contender and the start of a huge four-game series against the Yankees. The significance certainly wasn't lost on Ripken, who used his edition of the Legends Celebration Series to forge a link between the Hall of Famers who will forever populate the plaza behind center field and the new generation of Orioles players who have responded so well to the leadership of Buck Showalter.
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By Dan Connolly | July 14, 2012
Jim Palmer is being honored with his sculpture today. Several notables in attendance, none bigger than Brooks Robinson - who has missed the first two celebrations (Earl Weaver and Frank Robinson) due to health reasons. Brooks had his own ceremony pushed back to September. But he is here and looks good. Brooks received a huge ovation from the crowd. Also here are Hall-of-Famers Eddie Murray and Cal Ripken Jr. and Baltimore native Al Kaline. Frank Robinson, who lives in California, is the only Oriole in the Hall-of-Fame who didn't make it. Former Oriole Ken Singleton was the first speaker.
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Peter Schmuck | July 14, 2012
The pose was pure Jim Palmer. The ceremony to unveil his sculpture, as you might expect, was pitch perfect. Palmer became the third Orioles great to be immortalized in bronze and put on display in the Garden of Greats behind center field at Camden Yards on Saturday afternoon, joining Frank Robinson and Earl Weaver and awaiting the arrival of Eddie Murray , Cal Ripken and  Brooks Robinson later this season. It was a special day made even more special by the surprise appearance of Brooks, who has been in ill health and had to postpone his own statue unveiling until late September while he continues to regain his strength.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Four years into his major league career, Jim Palmer had gone from being a 19-year-old phenom to a World Series hero who outpitched Sandy Koufax before his 21st birthday to a sore-armed 23-year old trying to figure out a suddenly clouded future. Sidelined after tearing his rotator cuff, Palmer took classes at Towson State. He earned his license to sell insurance. He even planned to stay active in baseball if he couldn't pitch again. "I thought I was going to become a coach," Palmer recalled.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Former Orioles great Jim Palmer had his three Cy Young Award plaques hanging on his wall. His Gold Glove awards are in storage. They're mementos of accomplishments he will always remember and cherish, but Palmer says he didn't need them to validate a 19-year Hall of Fame career. So Palmer is auctioning them off. Palmer isn't in financial need, but said the sale of the trophies would help him care for his 15-year-old autistic stepson and his grandchildren. A portion of the profits will also go to the autism project of Palm Beach County.
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