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By Phil Jackman | June 17, 1993
* "Jim Murray, The autobiography of the Pulitzer Prize-winnin sports columnist," Macmillan, $20.There are any number of fine moments in sports -- so many, in fact, that it might qualify as death-defying to pare a list down to a dozen or so.But among them certainly would be the bell for Round 1 of a legitimate heavyweight title match, the opening tap of the NCAA basketball championship game, Secretariat closing out a Triple Crown with a 31-length victory and...
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SPORTS
By Gilbert Lewthwaite | June 8, 2000
Jim Murray, a Wall Street stock trader, was in Annapolis the other day to look at a boat. He is not an experienced sailor. What attracts him to the water is the notion of replacing tension with tranquility, of substituting island-hopping for the daily commute. He has mulled over the choice facing all sailors: mono-hull or multi-hull. His wife, Mary, helped him with the decision. She doesn't like heeling over, and she wants space. Jim was in town a look at a catamaran. As a visit to any local marina will quickly prove, this puts him in a distinct minority.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1998
Pulitzer Prize-winning sports columnist Jim Murray died late Sunday, which can mean only one thing.God loves a good read.Murray, whose eloquent voice and acerbic wit was the cornerstone of the Los Angeles Times sports section since 1961, died at his home from a heart attack at the age of 78 -- leaving behind a rich journalistic legacy and a legion of loyal readers.He was Picasso with a press card, Sinatra with a Smith-Corona. He was one of the five most influential sportswriters of all time, and one of the most popular and beloved figures in the history of print journalism.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- He is the golfer Americans love to hate. He is an annoying mix of pouty and brash. Even when Colin Montgomerie breaks into a smile, it looks as if the edges of his mouth are fighting the permanent frown that seems creased into his face. Yet there would be no better winner at this week's British Open at Carnoustie than Montgomerie. The site of the dour Scot holding the Claret Jug on his native soil might even warm the heart of his harshest detractors.
SPORTS
By Gilbert Lewthwaite | June 8, 2000
Jim Murray, a Wall Street stock trader, was in Annapolis the other day to look at a boat. He is not an experienced sailor. What attracts him to the water is the notion of replacing tension with tranquility, of substituting island-hopping for the daily commute. He has mulled over the choice facing all sailors: mono-hull or multi-hull. His wife, Mary, helped him with the decision. She doesn't like heeling over, and she wants space. Jim was in town a look at a catamaran. As a visit to any local marina will quickly prove, this puts him in a distinct minority.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | December 9, 1993
Brash. Assertive. Megalomaniacal.These are adjectives Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Jim Murray uses in his new biography to describe Jack Kent Cooke, the Washington Redskins owner who says he plans to move his NFL team to Laurel.But Murray, who got to know Cooke well during his days as a sports owner in Los Angeles, even having Cooke as a guest in his home, also says this of him: "He was as unstoppable as a glacier."It's good to keep all that in mind as we try to figure out Cooke's plan to abandon the District of Columbia and move his Redskins to Anne Arundel County.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 1999
CARNOUSTIE, Scotland -- He is the golfer Americans love to hate. He is an annoying mix of pouty and brash. Even when Colin Montgomerie breaks into a smile, it looks as if the edges of his mouth are fighting the permanent frown that seems creased into his face. Yet there would be no better winner at this week's British Open at Carnoustie than Montgomerie. The site of the dour Scot holding the Claret Jug on his native soil might even warm the heart of his harshest detractors.
SPORTS
September 24, 1998
Quote: "If they had a four-letter word for baseball, we'd probably be using it." -- The Cubs' Rod Beck, who blew just his sixth save in 56 opportunities as the Brewers rallied for 8-7 win.It's a fact: Scott Rolen has set a single-season Phillies record for doubles by a third baseman with his 44th. Pinky Whitney established the long-standing club mark with 43 in 1929.Who's hot: The Giants have scored 44 runs in their past four games.Who's not: The Pirates have lost seven of their past eight.
SPORTS
April 2, 1998
Alan Goldstein, a sports reporter at The Sun since 1959, has been named winner of the 1997 Nat Fleischer Memorial Award for "excellence in boxing journalism" presented by the Boxing Writers Association of America.Goldstein will receive the award tonight in New York. It is named for Fleischer, the founder and editor of Ring Magazine, and former winners include Jim Murray, Dave Anderson, Bert Sugar, Ron Borges and Wallace Matthews.Goldstein, 64, has covered virtually every sport for The Sun as a columnist or reporter.
SPORTS
October 15, 1999
Auto racingNASCAR: Fined car owner Kyle Petty $15,000 and crew chief Jim Murray $2,500 for rules violations following second-round qualifying for last Saturday's All Pro Bumper to Bumper 300.BaseballBlue Jays: Named Marteese Robinson coordinator, scouting; Jim Ridley assistant director, Canadian scouting; Ted Lekas major-league scout; Charles Alaino scouting supervisor for the Carolinas, Virginia and Washington, D.C.; Tim Huff scouting supervisor for Arizona,...
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1998
Pulitzer Prize-winning sports columnist Jim Murray died late Sunday, which can mean only one thing.God loves a good read.Murray, whose eloquent voice and acerbic wit was the cornerstone of the Los Angeles Times sports section since 1961, died at his home from a heart attack at the age of 78 -- leaving behind a rich journalistic legacy and a legion of loyal readers.He was Picasso with a press card, Sinatra with a Smith-Corona. He was one of the five most influential sportswriters of all time, and one of the most popular and beloved figures in the history of print journalism.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | December 9, 1993
Brash. Assertive. Megalomaniacal.These are adjectives Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Jim Murray uses in his new biography to describe Jack Kent Cooke, the Washington Redskins owner who says he plans to move his NFL team to Laurel.But Murray, who got to know Cooke well during his days as a sports owner in Los Angeles, even having Cooke as a guest in his home, also says this of him: "He was as unstoppable as a glacier."It's good to keep all that in mind as we try to figure out Cooke's plan to abandon the District of Columbia and move his Redskins to Anne Arundel County.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | June 17, 1993
* "Jim Murray, The autobiography of the Pulitzer Prize-winnin sports columnist," Macmillan, $20.There are any number of fine moments in sports -- so many, in fact, that it might qualify as death-defying to pare a list down to a dozen or so.But among them certainly would be the bell for Round 1 of a legitimate heavyweight title match, the opening tap of the NCAA basketball championship game, Secretariat closing out a Triple Crown with a 31-length victory and...
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
The car owned by Debra Ann Goodwich, the 19-year-old Baltimore woman who was fatally shot Friday at her parents' Stevenson home, was found yesterday parked at a Randallstown-area apartment complex off Liberty Road.Two alert residents of the Pikeswood Park Apartments who make a habit of listening to police radios called Baltimore County police at 4:45 p.m. when they spotted the car with Maryland tags ZXX 070 under a tree in their parking lot on Schnaper Drive.Police towed the 1988 maroon Honda Accord to headquarters in Towson for processing.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
The Greater Laurel United Soccer Club's fall season ended on Nov. 9; 301 boys and girls ages 4-18 took part in the program. All of this could not have been possible without the help of our dedicated volunteers. We would like to thank the following: U6: Gary Aldred, Emillee Carr, Ben Morgan; U8 Boys: Sid Zook, Jeremy Newkirk, Fred Agyeman, Andy Vernor, Mesmin Germain, Brian Smith, Antonio Portillo, Pam Dean, Brian Dean; U8 Girls: Beverly Gebhardt, Kevin Kenealy; U10 Boys: Joseph Bailor, Doug Spicher, Dion Johnson, Lars Kvale, Andrew Le; U10 Girls: Diego Rua, Psyche Forson, Kirk Zack, Joe Berry, Dion Johnson; U12 Boys: Jaime Blanco, John Camarano, Ben Morgan, Jim Murray; U12 Girls: Erin Justice, Karen Frederick, Michael Hicks; U14 Boys: Erin Justice, Dan Bowlds, Terry Butler; U14 Girls: Joe Berry, Bryan Bayer; high school boys: Mauricio Vargas; and youth referee coordinator: David Durnbaugh.
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