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Jim Mckay

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By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Ana Sebescen was only 11 when she experienced the reality of war in her homeland of Serbia. The date was April16, 1999. That was when a NATO bomb exploded 300 feet from her home. That night she made up her mind she would make a difference somewhere. Sebescen has been on course ever since then. A senior on a tennis scholarship at Coppin State , she has been named this year's winner of the NCAA Jim McKay Scholarship, given to a student-athlete who has excelled academically and who intends to pursue a graduate degree in the communications field.
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By Don Markus | May 18, 2013
Robert Vigorito knew he had changed some lives over the years since he helped start the Columbia Triathlon in 1984. He transformed an inaugural event that attracted fewer than 100 competitors into one of the top triathlons in the country with as many as 2,500 coming to Centennial Park each spring since 1988. It wasn't surprising, considering that Vigorito knew how competing in triathlons had changed his own life. Vigorito, whose friends growing up in East Haven, Conn., called him "Pig Iron" because he was usually among the slowest in whatever sport they were playing, went from not knowing what a triathlon was to competing in the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii six times.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
Broadway Producer, at 9-5, has been established as the early-line favorite for Saturday's $200,000 Maryland Million Classic, the showcase race in the 24th running of the Jim McKay Maryland Million. The 2008 Turf winner is trying to become the second horse in Maryland Million history to win the Classic the next year, joining Master Speaker who did it in 1988-1989. Broadway Producer, trained by John Terranova, hasn't tasted victory this year. But he'll be ridden by jockey Ramon Dominguez, the nation's leading rider this year with more than $13 million in earnings.
SPORTS
By John Scheinman, Baltimore Sun Media Group | October 6, 2012
There was no surprise and little wonder for trainer King Leatherbury, when his nearly machine-like 6-year-old gelding Ben's Cat won yet again Saturday on Maryland Million Day at Laurel Park. Victory has become expected. At age 79, with 6,349 career victories - third all-time in racing history - Leatherbury has pretty much seen it all in 53 years of training. Yet, of the thousands of horses that have passed through his barn over the years, none has been able to get it done like Ben's Cat. Bred by Leatherbury, Ben's Cat didn't even race as a 2-year-old because of a broken pelvis, but he has produced almost nothing but trips to the winner's circle since his career began three years ago. Under jockey Julien Pimentel, the dark brown speedster, sired by an obscure stallion named Parker's Storm Cat, raced in third place off dueling long shots Boltin' Out and Steady Warrior in the $100,000 Maryland Million Turf Sprint, took control at the top of the stretch and held off a late challenge from Heros Reward to win by three-quarters of a length.
FEATURES
By MARY COREY | February 2, 1992
WHEN JIM MCKAY INTRO- duces millions to the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat, he is not speaking to a wide world. He's addressing an audience of one: his wife, Margaret McManus.That's the formula the ABC sportscaster has followed for the past 30 years. And judging from his reputation -- and the couple's Emmy-filled den -- it has worked."When we first went to New York, I met Arthur Godfrey," he recalls. "He said, 'The only advice I could give you about TV is . . . when somebody's watching you at home there may be 5 million people, but they're not watching like a crowd.
SPORTS
June 10, 2008
A funeral Mass for Jim McKay is scheduled for 11 a.m. today at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen in Baltimore. A memorial tribute will begin 30 minutes before the service. WMAR will broadcast a news special, including funeral coverage, starting at 10:25 a.m.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Jim McKay probably would have been a little embarrassed that an entire ballroom of people made such a fuss in his honor last night at the Hilton Baltimore. Throughout his broadcasting career, he always strived to make the story about his subjects, not him. But nearly 1,000 people turned out to honor McKay - who passed away in June at age 86 - and celebrate his unique and graceful career for the Babe Ruth Museum's "Champions' Tribute to Jim McKay." Among them were some of Maryland's most famous Olympians: Michael Phelps, Dorothy Hamill, Sugar Ray Leonard, Ronaldo Nehemiah and Katie Hoff.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | April 5, 1992
Billy Boniface usually presents the trophy to the winner of the Deputed Testamony Stakes.The Pimlico race honors his 1983 Preakness winner, the last Maryland-bred to win the Triple Crown race.But before the race yesterday, Boniface told track operator Joe De Francis, "You better be on hand to present the trophy, because I plan on winning it."Boniface's prediction came true.John The Bold, the big chestnut gelding Boniface trains for the legendary ABC sportscaster Jim McKay and his wife, Margaret, charged through the stretch and withstood a late challenge from Frottage to win the 1 1/8 mile stakes for state-bred 3-year-olds by a head.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
Margaret Dempsey McManus, a former Evening Sun reporter and syndicated columnist who was the widow of sports broadcasting legend Jim McKay, died Thursday in her sleep of congestive heart failure at her Monkton home. She was 89. Born Margaret Mary Dempsey in Baltimore and raised on Park Avenue in Towson, she was a Towson Catholic High School graduate and basketball team captain. She earned a degree in 1942 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, where she was editor of the school newspaper.
FEATURES
By PATRICK SANDOR | February 2, 1992
The following is a letter from Jim McKay, the ABC Sports commentator and a Maryland resident, to his grandson, James, upon the occasion of the 16th Winter Olympic Games, which begin this Saturday in France.The woman referred to in the letter as "Mong" is James' grandmother and Jim McKay's wife, Margaret McManus. The couple's real surname is McManus and that is what their Baltimore friends usually call them. James' parents are Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fontelieu of Baltimore.Dear James,I know you remember the Winter Olympics in Calgary.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
Cal Ripken Jr. and Eddie Murray will be inducted into the Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards' Hall of Legends during the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation's annual gala in September, according to a news release. "Cal & Eddie: A Legendary Evening" will take place on Wednesday, Sept. 5, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Hilton Baltimore, the foundation said. The event is one day before Ripken is scheduled to have a statue unveiled as part of the Orioles Legends Celebration Series at Camden Yards.
EXPLORE
October 17, 2011
• Oct. 2, 1911, Laurel Park opened for racing under the direction of the Laurel Four County Fair. Three years later, New York City grocery entrepreneur James Butler purchased the track and made renowned promoter Matt Winn general manager. Winn is known for developing the Kentucky Derby into America's greatest horse race. • On Oct. 18, 1917, Hourless defeated Omar Khayyam in a historic match race. Hourless had won the Belmont Stakes that year and Omar Khayyam the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Ana Sebescen was only 11 when she experienced the reality of war in her homeland of Serbia. The date was April16, 1999. That was when a NATO bomb exploded 300 feet from her home. That night she made up her mind she would make a difference somewhere. Sebescen has been on course ever since then. A senior on a tennis scholarship at Coppin State , she has been named this year's winner of the NCAA Jim McKay Scholarship, given to a student-athlete who has excelled academically and who intends to pursue a graduate degree in the communications field.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 16, 2009
Margaret Dempsey McManus, a former Evening Sun reporter and syndicated columnist who was the widow of sports broadcasting legend Jim McKay, died Thursday in her sleep of congestive heart failure at her Monkton home. She was 89. Born Margaret Mary Dempsey in Baltimore and raised on Park Avenue in Towson, she was a Towson Catholic High School graduate and basketball team captain. She earned a degree in 1942 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, where she was editor of the school newspaper.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
Broadway Producer, at 9-5, has been established as the early-line favorite for Saturday's $200,000 Maryland Million Classic, the showcase race in the 24th running of the Jim McKay Maryland Million. The 2008 Turf winner is trying to become the second horse in Maryland Million history to win the Classic the next year, joining Master Speaker who did it in 1988-1989. Broadway Producer, trained by John Terranova, hasn't tasted victory this year. But he'll be ridden by jockey Ramon Dominguez, the nation's leading rider this year with more than $13 million in earnings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | November 9, 2008
A lineup of athletes - including Sugar Ray Leonard, Dorothy Hamill, Katie Hoff, Kimmie Meissner, Vicky Bullett, Charles Jenkins, Jessica Long and Tom McMillen - is impressive enough. Mingling with them and other sports stars and reporters at a Baltimore party can make you downright giddy. That was certainly the mood inside the Sports Legends Museum, where a couple hundred folks gathered for a VIP reception benefiting the Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation. That soiree was just the warm-up for the evening's big bash.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2008
Sportscasting great Jim McKay, who will be buried today, was passionate about horses and the racing industry. He was a man who could tell you the name of the first horse he bet on as a 14-year-old - Bay Dean - at Laurel Park and how much it paid - $151.20. And he would tell you straight out: That day at Laurel with his dad was the day he fell in love with the sport. And without him, the Maryland Million, which many believe will be his greatest legacy to thoroughbred racing, might not exist.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | September 7, 1991
To the rest of the country, Jim McKay is the man who held overnight vigil in an ABC broadcast booth during the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Olympics and the man who has traveled the wide world of sports for the past thirtysomething years.But to Maryland, and its horse racing community, Jim McKay is the man who brought a number of previously warring factions together for an event that in its first five years has made an impact both locally and nationally. In many ways, Jim McKay is the Maryland Million.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Jim McKay probably would have been a little embarrassed that an entire ballroom of people made such a fuss in his honor last night at the Hilton Baltimore. Throughout his broadcasting career, he always strived to make the story about his subjects, not him. But nearly 1,000 people turned out to honor McKay - who passed away in June at age 86 - and celebrate his unique and graceful career for the Babe Ruth Museum's "Champions' Tribute to Jim McKay." Among them were some of Maryland's most famous Olympians: Michael Phelps, Dorothy Hamill, Sugar Ray Leonard, Ronaldo Nehemiah and Katie Hoff.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | October 31, 2008
Jim McKay saw so much of the world during his lengthy and legendary broadcasting career. His syrupy voice, endearing charm and calming presence always made viewers of ABC's Wide World of Sports feel at home, whether he was profiling cliff divers in Acapulco or ice boat racers in Wisconsin. Home, however, always had a specific meaning to McKay. Though he was born in Philadelphia, worked in New York City for much of his career, and raised his children in Connecticut, he was always, in his heart, a true Maryland man. The state, and especially the city of Baltimore, meant a great deal to him, even at the height of his fame.
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