Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJim Harrison
IN THE NEWS

Jim Harrison

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Returning to Earth By Jim Harrison Grove Press / 280 pages / $24 Jim Harrison presents American readers with an alternative history. In his work, people live as if their deaths mattered, not like frat boys on a bender; they seem capable of thinking one or two generations ahead. He offers - take it or leave it - a roomy definition of integrity endlessly open to interpretation and based on relationships with the earth, with one's family, with oneself. Locating ourselves in the four directions, in the march of ancestors, in the web of species, Harrison means to tell us, might help us feel safer, which would make us kinder and less destructive.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2007
Returning to Earth By Jim Harrison Grove Press / 280 pages / $24 Jim Harrison presents American readers with an alternative history. In his work, people live as if their deaths mattered, not like frat boys on a bender; they seem capable of thinking one or two generations ahead. He offers - take it or leave it - a roomy definition of integrity endlessly open to interpretation and based on relationships with the earth, with one's family, with oneself. Locating ourselves in the four directions, in the march of ancestors, in the web of species, Harrison means to tell us, might help us feel safer, which would make us kinder and less destructive.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TIM WARREN THE AXEMAN'S JAZZ. Julie Smith. St. Martin's. 341 pages. $19.95 | September 22, 1991
JUST BEFORE DARK:COLLECTED NONFICTION.Jim Harrison.Clark City Press.320 pages. $24.95. Jim Harrison is a fine writer of fiction (especially his novellas) and poetry, and a crusty old soul who probably wouldn't mind jabbing you in the chest to make a point. Writing from rural Michigan, he loves hunting, fishing, great food (and great quantities of it) and solitude. He's the rare sort who can dress the deer he just killed and also quote extensively from little-known Russian poets.What comes through in this collection of essays, magazine pieces and other assorted writings is exactly this mixture of the comic, the gentle and the quarrelsome.
FEATURES
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
"The Road Home," by Jim Harrison. Grove/Atlantic. 416 pages. $25. Pine Ridge and the infamous Wounded Knee hover on the Nebraska landscape of Jim Harrison's deeply moving new novel, "The Road Home," sequel to his 1988 "Dalva." White and mixed blooded Native American characters alike mourn "the cruelty of what happened to our first citizens" in this lush and beautiful book, a tour de force of compassion. Of voices, there are five: the elderly half-Lakota Northridge; his great grandson Nelse; his daughter-in-law Naomi; his surviving son Paul; and his granddaughter Dalva herself in a heart-wrenchingly apocalyptic finale.
FEATURES
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
"The Road Home," by Jim Harrison. Grove/Atlantic. 416 pages. $25. Pine Ridge and the infamous Wounded Knee hover on the Nebraska landscape of Jim Harrison's deeply moving new novel, "The Road Home," sequel to his 1988 "Dalva." White and mixed blooded Native American characters alike mourn "the cruelty of what happened to our first citizens" in this lush and beautiful book, a tour de force of compassion. Of voices, there are five: the elderly half-Lakota Northridge; his great grandson Nelse; his daughter-in-law Naomi; his surviving son Paul; and his granddaughter Dalva herself in a heart-wrenchingly apocalyptic finale.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Years without a strong competitor in the spice business allowed McCormick & Co. Inc. to grow a bit complacent while resting on its famous brand name, company executives said yesterday.But no more, the managers vowed to a standing-room-only crowd at the annual shareholders' meeting yesterday.Sounding at times like football coaches at halftime, McCormick executives predicted victory in a recently erupted spice war against Burns, Philp & Co. Ltd., an Australian company that has bought up competitors and started a bidding war for supermarket shelf space.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer Staff writer Dan Thanh Dang contributed to this article | August 20, 1995
At first, those who mourned Susan Hurley Harrison could not bring themselves to say the word without wincing. They had few illusions -- virtually everyone believed Susan was dead, and was convinced of this fact within days of her disappearance on Aug. 6, 1994. But the word itself was so stark and inanimate, so cold and flat.Body. They were looking for a body.The word was always there, in the back and front of their minds. It was all they thought about -- Susan's siblings, her sons, her first husband.
NEWS
December 18, 2008
On December 12, 2008, CAROLYN HODGES CROMWELL, 61, of Midlothian VA; born in Roanoke, VA to the late C. Andrew Hodges and Eleanor Graff Hodges, she passed away after a long battle with a brain tumor. She is survived by her loving husband of 29 years, Robert "Bob" Cromwell, Jr.; her children, George Richardson Turner, III and his life partner, Jim Harrison, of San Diego, Ca, David Scott Turner and his wife, Elizabeth, of Vienna, Elizabeth Hodges Cromwell of Arlington and Robert Joshua Cromwell of Midlothian; three sisters, Mary H. Coleman and her husband John, Margaret H. Furr and Ann G Hodges; her brother Lt. Col. C. Andrews Hodges, Jr. and his wife Jo Ann; sister-in-law Joann Crowell Hammond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 23, 2011
Last week, we introduced the "Wile E. Coyote Anvil of Reason Award," given to that person in the news who most needs a dose of brutal cartoonish enlightenment. This week, we have several worthy nominees. They are:  •  Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) . Nominated for skirting tax laws to the tune of nearly $300,000 relating to her private plane.  What is it with politicians and paying taxes? At least McCaskill can seek tax advice from the president's top money man, Tim Geithner.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | October 12, 1993
Police jurisdictions in the metropolitan Washington area are cooperating with the Road Runners Club of America on problems encountered by female runners and walkers.As the days grow shorter and it gets dark earlier, the RRCA draws attention to the following safety tips -- no matter where you are running:* Don't wear headphones.* Vary your route.* Run with a dog or partner.* Avoid isolated areas.* Notice details of strangers and trust your instincts.* Call police if someone bothers you or you notice a person out of the ordinary.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Years without a strong competitor in the spice business allowed McCormick & Co. Inc. to grow a bit complacent while resting on its famous brand name, company executives said yesterday.But no more, the managers vowed to a standing-room-only crowd at the annual shareholders' meeting yesterday.Sounding at times like football coaches at halftime, McCormick executives predicted victory in a recently erupted spice war against Burns, Philp & Co. Ltd., an Australian company that has bought up competitors and started a bidding war for supermarket shelf space.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN THE AXEMAN'S JAZZ. Julie Smith. St. Martin's. 341 pages. $19.95 | September 22, 1991
JUST BEFORE DARK:COLLECTED NONFICTION.Jim Harrison.Clark City Press.320 pages. $24.95. Jim Harrison is a fine writer of fiction (especially his novellas) and poetry, and a crusty old soul who probably wouldn't mind jabbing you in the chest to make a point. Writing from rural Michigan, he loves hunting, fishing, great food (and great quantities of it) and solitude. He's the rare sort who can dress the deer he just killed and also quote extensively from little-known Russian poets.What comes through in this collection of essays, magazine pieces and other assorted writings is exactly this mixture of the comic, the gentle and the quarrelsome.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1999
A $17 million wrongful death suit by the sons of the late Susan Hurley Harrison against their stepfather was abruptly dismissed this week, averting a trial to decide if James J. Harrison Jr. is responsible for his estranged wife's killing. He has not been criminally charged.The reason for the dismissal was not part of the public court record yesterday, and lawyers in the case refused to say why they ended the case or whether there was a financial settlement.Court records show that Harrison -- whom police long called the main suspect in the Ruxton woman's disappearance and death -- has suffered mental deterioration that could have prevented him from attending a trial.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler | September 20, 1996
'Girls Town'** 1/2 ; Rated R(language, mature themes)It's too bad TV's After School Specials don't allow this kind of language, because "Girls Town" would have been a great hour-long drama for high school students. At 90 minutes, it's a little overextended, but protective parents would probably shudder to have their kids see this film anyway. "This ain't no '90210,' " as Lili Taylor's character says. Instead, "Girls Town" is an intense condemnation of all the things that can make young women's lives desperate and horrific.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.