Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJim Garrison
IN THE NEWS

Jim Garrison

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David Robb and David Robb,THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER | June 19, 1996
A federal judge in Los Angeles dealt a potentially stunning blow to Hollywood's system of "creative accounting" Monday as he certified a lawsuit over "JFK" that was filed by the estate of Jim Garrison as a class-action suit.If U.S. District Court Judge Robert Takasugi's ruling is upheld on appeal, the case is certain to become the mother of all Hollywood lawsuits, allowing thousands of actors, writers, directors and producers who feel they've been cheated out of net profits from motion pictures to join the plaintiffs as members of the aggrieved class.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2005
A Farewell To Justice: Jim Garrison, JFK's Assassination, and the Case That Should Have Changed History Joan Mellen Potomac Books / 547 pages The debate over who assassinated President John F. Kennedy 42 years ago will not end. As hundreds of books on the topic pile up, the authors tend to find common ground on only one major point: The official U.S. government version of Lee Harvey Oswald as a lone assassin working for himself is bunk. Entering the debate is author Joan Mellen, who is simultaneously an unlikely and likely participant.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | December 23, 1991
In Oliver Stone's "JFK," Kevin Costner plays crusading attorney Jim Garrison, who challenged the Warren Commission's report on the John F. Kennedy assassination by bringing New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to trial on a conspiracy charge.Unlike Mr. Stone, Mr. Costner -- a friend of President Bush -- is reluctant to discuss politics."My politics vary on different issues," says Mr. Costner. "When I was in college, my brother was in Vietnam. The most daring thing I did in college was listen to Mort Sahl.
FEATURES
By David Robb and David Robb,THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER | June 19, 1996
A federal judge in Los Angeles dealt a potentially stunning blow to Hollywood's system of "creative accounting" Monday as he certified a lawsuit over "JFK" that was filed by the estate of Jim Garrison as a class-action suit.If U.S. District Court Judge Robert Takasugi's ruling is upheld on appeal, the case is certain to become the mother of all Hollywood lawsuits, allowing thousands of actors, writers, directors and producers who feel they've been cheated out of net profits from motion pictures to join the plaintiffs as members of the aggrieved class.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 28, 1991
With all the hoopla over Oliver Stone's John F. Kennedy assassination movie, a bit of history is in order.Former New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, the central figure in Stone's "JFK," first sold the rights to his story to the producing-directing team of Jerry Zucker, David Zucker and Jim Abrahams (known mostly for comedies like "Airplane!" and "Naked Gun").Team Zucker got interested in Garrison's story in the early 1980s, approached him and subsequently bought the rights to Garrison's life story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By STEVE WEINBERG and STEVE WEINBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 4, 2005
A Farewell To Justice: Jim Garrison, JFK's Assassination, and the Case That Should Have Changed History Joan Mellen Potomac Books / 547 pages The debate over who assassinated President John F. Kennedy 42 years ago will not end. As hundreds of books on the topic pile up, the authors tend to find common ground on only one major point: The official U.S. government version of Lee Harvey Oswald as a lone assassin working for himself is bunk. Entering the debate is author Joan Mellen, who is simultaneously an unlikely and likely participant.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | June 12, 1992
IN THE PIVOTAL scene in Oliver Stone's comic-book movie, "JFK," a military man named "X" is sitting on a park bench in Washington and unraveling the plot to kill John F. Kennedy.The murder, "X" tells Prosecutor Jim Garrison in the film, was masterminded by Pentagon generals and the CIA to scuttle President Kennedy's plans to pull out of Vietnam."Don't take my word," says "X." "Do your own work -- your own thinkin'."Many moviegoers did their own thinkin' and shrugged. Yeah, probably happened that way. Most believers seemed to be young; half of Americans weren't alive when JFK was killed in 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 20, 1991
Oliver Stone is the Elmer Gantry of the American left, selling that old-time religion of conspiracy and victimization by dark forces. But even as he's booming so majestically from the pulpit, he's stealing your wallet and trying to make time with your wife.Thus his new movie "JFK" is a work that's easy to like -- I defy anybody to deny the hypnotic grace and slickness of its 3 hours and 10 minutes -- but hard to trust. In fact, I don't trust it any farther than I could throw it.Who killed JFK?
NEWS
By TRB | December 3, 1992
Washington. -- In the past few months I've started reading the obituaries. Yes, I know, this is supposed to be a sign of age, intimations of mortality, and so on. But the obits are actually somewhat reassuring on this score. One's forties seem to be a relatively safe haven. AIDS and suicide are mainly visible in the rear-view mirror, while cancer and heart attacks are mostly distant specks on the horizon.No, what appeals to me about the obituaries is the poetry, HTC specifically the poetry of the headlines.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 5, 1992
Kevin Costner, who plays New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison in the Oliver Stone film "JFK," has purchased a getaway home in California's Santa Barbara County.Mr. Costner's permanent residence is in the foothills near Glendale, Calif.His getaway home is a five-bedroom, 6,000-square-foot-plus house in a gated community just south of Montecito, Calif. He paid about $3 million for it, sources say.The year-old home has a guest suite with its own entrance, two children's bedrooms and a large master bedroom with a 40-foot deck facing the ocean.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | June 12, 1992
IN THE PIVOTAL scene in Oliver Stone's comic-book movie, "JFK," a military man named "X" is sitting on a park bench in Washington and unraveling the plot to kill John F. Kennedy.The murder, "X" tells Prosecutor Jim Garrison in the film, was masterminded by Pentagon generals and the CIA to scuttle President Kennedy's plans to pull out of Vietnam."Don't take my word," says "X." "Do your own work -- your own thinkin'."Many moviegoers did their own thinkin' and shrugged. Yeah, probably happened that way. Most believers seemed to be young; half of Americans weren't alive when JFK was killed in 1963.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | December 23, 1991
In Oliver Stone's "JFK," Kevin Costner plays crusading attorney Jim Garrison, who challenged the Warren Commission's report on the John F. Kennedy assassination by bringing New Orleans businessman Clay Shaw to trial on a conspiracy charge.Unlike Mr. Stone, Mr. Costner -- a friend of President Bush -- is reluctant to discuss politics."My politics vary on different issues," says Mr. Costner. "When I was in college, my brother was in Vietnam. The most daring thing I did in college was listen to Mort Sahl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 20, 1991
Oliver Stone is the Elmer Gantry of the American left, selling that old-time religion of conspiracy and victimization by dark forces. But even as he's booming so majestically from the pulpit, he's stealing your wallet and trying to make time with your wife.Thus his new movie "JFK" is a work that's easy to like -- I defy anybody to deny the hypnotic grace and slickness of its 3 hours and 10 minutes -- but hard to trust. In fact, I don't trust it any farther than I could throw it.Who killed JFK?
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 28, 1991
With all the hoopla over Oliver Stone's John F. Kennedy assassination movie, a bit of history is in order.Former New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, the central figure in Stone's "JFK," first sold the rights to his story to the producing-directing team of Jerry Zucker, David Zucker and Jim Abrahams (known mostly for comedies like "Airplane!" and "Naked Gun").Team Zucker got interested in Garrison's story in the early 1980s, approached him and subsequently bought the rights to Garrison's life story.
FEATURES
By John Newman and John Newman,Contributing Writer | September 22, 1993
The first thing that strikes you upon opening this new book on the assassination of John F. Kennedy is that author Gerald Posner has not seen the hundreds of thousands of pages of newly released documents. They were declassified pursuant to the JFK records act and signed into law by then-President Bush in January. I have spent countless evenings immersed in these files over the past six months and find that the very title of Mr. Posner's book is presumptuous: It asks us to believe he has closed the case before we have had a chance to digest the facts that have only now been made public.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and By Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | March 14, 1999
"False Witness: The Real Story of Jim Garrison's Investigation and Oliver Stone's Film JFK," by Patricia Lambert. M. Evans & Co. 352 pages. $24.95.As New Orleans' District Attorney Jim Garrison's biographer, I confess to an interest in Patricia Lambert's "False Witness." Jim Garrison, who in 1969 prosecuted Clay Shaw unsuccessfully for conspiracy to murder President Kennedy, was a complex man and no saint."False Witness," alas, is little more than an unpleasant one-sided diatribe, a belated, curious valentine to the elusive Shaw.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.