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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
Why can't "inspirational" sports movies have an iota or a nanosecond of genuine artistic inspiration? Pride tells the usual fact-inspired story of a coach who's had to come from behind in his own life, turning a gaggle of rough-edged inner-city athletes into an ace competitive corps. This time the sport is swimming, the city is Philadelphia, and the hero is Jim Ellis (Terrence Howard), who founded the Philadelphia Department of Recreation swim team and made the initials PDR stand for "Pride, Determination, and Resilience."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 23, 2007
Why can't "inspirational" sports movies have an iota or a nanosecond of genuine artistic inspiration? Pride tells the usual fact-inspired story of a coach who's had to come from behind in his own life, turning a gaggle of rough-edged inner-city athletes into an ace competitive corps. This time the sport is swimming, the city is Philadelphia, and the hero is Jim Ellis (Terrence Howard), who founded the Philadelphia Department of Recreation swim team and made the initials PDR stand for "Pride, Determination, and Resilience."
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By DAN RODRICKS | June 15, 2006
I didn't know it at the time -- I didn't ask, and he didn't tell -- but a retired FBI agent, once the supervisor of its narcotics squad in Baltimore, is among the dozens of men and women who volunteered in the past six months to help drug dealers and other ex-offenders find jobs. His name is Jim Ellis, and he buys into our modest, one-on-one effort to pull Baltimore out of its long, dreary heroin-and-cocaine mess. One man, one woman at a time -- that's how we do it: those already in the mainstream connecting to those who'd like to get there.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 15, 2006
I didn't know it at the time -- I didn't ask, and he didn't tell -- but a retired FBI agent, once the supervisor of its narcotics squad in Baltimore, is among the dozens of men and women who volunteered in the past six months to help drug dealers and other ex-offenders find jobs. His name is Jim Ellis, and he buys into our modest, one-on-one effort to pull Baltimore out of its long, dreary heroin-and-cocaine mess. One man, one woman at a time -- that's how we do it: those already in the mainstream connecting to those who'd like to get there.
FEATURES
March 23, 2007
WHAT YOU SAY There were some great movies nominated for this past season's Oscars, and the actors and actresses deserved well-intended accolades and praises. But as a diversion from severity, violence and language, I would prefer to purchase the DVD A Night at the Museum starring Ben Stiller, for an evening of fun and fantasy. I think Ben Stiller is a great actor, and he certainly proved his talent in this movie. Freda Garelick, Baltimore THE NEXT QUESTION Actor Terrence Howard stars in Pride, which opens today, as Jim Ellis, a Philadelphia swim coach who takes a team of nonswimmers and turns them into swimmers who win meets.
NEWS
March 29, 2005
On Saturday, March 26, 2005, MIRIAM KONIGSBERG (nee Schwartzman); beloved wife of the late Dr. Wilfred K. Konigsberg; loving mother of Betty Ellyn of Los Angeles, CA, Nancy Wolfson of Chevy Chase, MD, Janis Ellis of Baltimore, and Anne Konigsberg-Fishman of Irvine, CA; dear mother-in-law of Martin Ellyn, Charles Wolfson, Jim Ellis and Geoff Fishman; adored sister of the late Dorothy Grossblatt, Bernice Taube Kenen, Marjorie Dunie and Maurice Schwartzman; dear...
NEWS
March 9, 1994
TOBACCO LOBBY -- Hard hit by report after report on health risks and impending tax increases, the tobacco industry has started to regain its composure and will fight for its life with a march on Washington today.The Tobacco Action Coalition, which claims 17,000 members, including tobacco company employees, farmers and smokers' rights groups, said that it would march to protest the Clinton administration's plan to triple the current 24-cent tax on a pack of cigarettes in order to fund health care.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- SBC Communications Inc. and Ameritech Corp. said yesterday that they had agreed to enter 30 local telephone markets in the next 2 1/2 years in return for regulatory approval of SBC's $78 billion purchase of Ameritech.The proposal is one of 26 conditions that the staff of the Federal Communications Commission said should be met before the commission approves the merger. The plan is designed to increase local phone competition and access to high-speed Internet services for consumers.
NEWS
By Kiesha Simpson and Kiesha Simpson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 9, 1995
Plans are under way to rebuild a rock climbing gym that burned in the fatal Clipper Industrial Park fire last month."We are definitely rebuilding and reopening," said Jim Ellis, owner of the Clipper City Rock Gym. "The support is overwhelming considering we started with nothing. Climbers have lost a big part of their lives."The rock gym, one of the East Coast's largest facilities, had more than 12,000 registered climbers nationwide on its list, Mr. Ellis said. "Children 7 to 8 years old came here, even 50 years old," he said.
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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | March 9, 1992
In Baltimore these days, people are climbing the walls.Literally.Indoor rock climbing has come to town, folks. You can indulge in the sport at the Clipper City Rock Gym, which looks more like a dank, cavernous warehouse than a typical gym."I have really wanted to do this for a long time," said 19-year-old Allison Steiner, as she tied a rope around her waist in preparation for her first climb. The Johns Hopkins University sophomore always has enjoyed things like hiking and camping -- and sees this sport as the next logical step.
NEWS
By LIANNE HART and LIANNE HART,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
AUSTIN, TEXAS -- A judge heard arguments yesterday over whether the money-laundering and conspiracy case against Rep. Tom DeLay, a Texas Republican, should be dismissed - with the defense asserting that the charges are flawed and the prosecution arguing that the powerful lawmaker should be held accountable for circumventing election laws. DeLay is charged with illegally funneling corporate campaign contributions to Republican candidates in Texas' 2002 legislative races. He appeared in court with his wife at his side but did not make any statements.
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