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NEWS
August 2, 2012
Sunday mornings are whenRobert L. Ehrlich Jr.gets to share his right-wing political views with the rest of us, but his most recent column was more extreme than usual ("It's not easy being attorney general," July 29). He defends Jim Crow politics in the South and anti-immigrant bigotry in Arizona. But the most outrageous position he takes is to defend the cruel voter suppression measures in a number of states designed to keep minorities and low-income voters from exercising their right to vote.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 24, 2014
"Discrimination," he said, "is horrible. It's hurtful. It has no place in civilized society... " You would think that statement, delivered recently in the Kansas legislature, a noble sentiment no right-thinking person could argue with. But we are gathered here today to argue with it. Because it turns out that when Republican legislator Charles Macheers said "discrimination," he didn't mean, well ... discrimination. Mr. Macheers sponsored a bill -- passed overwhelmingly by the Kansas House, but killed last week by the Senate in an attack of common sense -- that sought to exempt any business or government employee from providing "any services, accommodations, advantages, facilities, goods or privileges" related to any "marriage, domestic partnership, civil union or similar arrangement" if doing so would conflict with the employee's" sincerely held religious beliefs.
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NEWS
June 14, 2011
While ostensibly designed to help curb illegal immigration, the impact of Alabama's HB 56 ("Alabama sets new standard," June 10) will instead be to punish and further intimidate illegals who already reside in that state. Much like Jim Crow, the spirit and provisions of this legislation give Alabama legal sanction to restrict minority access to education, employment, public services and the right to due process. It likewise criminalizes the efforts of good citizens to provide assistance to illegal immigrants, while giving police nearly unfettered power to act upon their own personal prejudices.
NEWS
February 16, 2014
As a professor at American University's School of International Service, I am alarmed that two bipartisan bills are currently being considered by the Maryland General Assembly ( "Maryland bills would stifle academic freedom," Feb. 12). Senate Bill 647 and the House Bill 998 would impose significant financial sanctions on universities, professors, students and other members of professional associations that pass resolutions unpopular with certain powerful groups. Had such bills been approved in the past, the boycott and divestment campaign against South Africa, Jim Crow, or Gallo grapes would have been far more arduous.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 7, 2012
Kemba Smith Pradia went to Tallahassee, Fla., last week to demand the right to vote. Back in the '90s, when she was just Kemba Smith, she became a poster child for the excesses and inanities of the so-called War on Drugs. Ms. Pradia, then a college student in Virginia, became involved with, and terrorized by, a man who choked and punched her regularly and viciously. By the impenetrable logic of battered women, she thought it was her fault. The boyfriend was a drug dealer. Pradia never handled drugs, never used drugs, never sold drugs.
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | January 23, 2013
Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Baltimore-born Thurgood Marshall, the civil rights lawyer and first black Supreme Court justice who was instrumental in ending Jim Crow segregation. His representation of schoolgirl Linda Brown resulted in the landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which ended separation practiced in a wide variety of public facilities and institutions. Yet Marshall sought more than just desegregation. Explaining his vision, Marshall proclaimed that "a child born to a black mother in a state like Mississippi … has exactly the same rights as a white baby born to the wealthiest person in the United States.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | May 20, 1994
Nashville, Tennessee -- Almost 40 years ago I came to this city to write an article for Redbook magazine about the brave black parents who tried to ensure that Brown v. Board of Education was enforced. The article was entitled ''We Send Our Children Into Trouble.''One of the saddest fallouts from the failure of Americans to accept and enforce the 1954 decree outlawing segregated schools is the current reluctance of millions of black Americans to risk anything in a struggle for integration.
NEWS
By Martin Luther King III and Greg Palast | May 8, 2003
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- Astonishingly, and sadly, four decades after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. marched in Birmingham, we must ask again, "Do African-Americans have the unimpeded right to vote in the United States?" In 1963, Dr. King's determined and courageous band faced water hoses and police attack dogs to call attention to the thicket of Jim Crow laws -- including poll taxes and so-called "literacy" tests -- that stood in the way of black Americans' right to have their ballots cast and counted.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | April 6, 2008
While researching my civil rights book, I gave a brief work-in-progress talk at a woman's club in Baltimore. A member of the audience came up to me afterward to make this observation about the task I was beginning to confront: "You'll never get the ambience of those days." I thought I knew what she meant. Jim Crow discrimination was sustained by a level of passion that might be difficult to convey. And there was the fact that while I had grown up at the end of the Jim Crow era in North Carolina, I had not grown up black.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 21, 1996
Is Black History Month still needed? With characters like Dinesh D'Souza running around, you're danged skippy it is.D'Souza's parents emigrated to the United States from India when he was a teen-ager. He attended Dartmouth College, where he edited the conservative campus newspaper the Dartmouth Review. Then he graduated and now devotes himself to his true calling: writing tendentious books to pester and annoy Negroes.His latest work is "The End of Racism." But believe me, this guy -- and the folks at the American Enterprise Institute, where D'Souza is a fellow -- don't want to end racism as much as recycle it. They don't want a return to Jim Crow, per se. But they might settle for a system of James Crow, Esquire.
NEWS
February 2, 2014
I always have a good laugh when you run your "Red Maryland" column, and the most recent exercise in pointless drivel was no exception ( "To help children, start in the womb," Jan. 31). First of all, just to state a simple yet obvious fact that seems to elude some people: an embryo is not a person and no amount of wishing it is so will make it true. A baby is born when it draws its first breath. In fact, the Bible (which these right wing ignoramuses always reference, but none of them seems to bother to read or understand)
NEWS
By Jack C. Hill | January 20, 2014
As an English teacher, I've always enjoyed the pleasures of reading; specifically, the writings of 19th and 20th century martyrs and confessors who used eloquent narratives and folklore to tell stories of their rags and redemption. But my reading never quite prepared me for the task of reflecting on my personal experience with a particular martyred leader from which my own life, faith and view of the world would be deeply affected. I grew up in Baltimore and was raised by a single mother who believed that storytelling and faith was all that mattered.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | July 8, 2013
Harry Anderson, a magician and comic (made famous by his stint as the judge on the old sitcom "Night Court"), used to have a routine where he'd promise to juggle George Washington's ax. I'm quoting from memory here, but he'd say something like: "I have here George Washington's original ax -- the one he used to chop down the cherry tree. " He'd wait a beat, and then add: "Of course, a few years ago the blade broke and had to be replaced. And about a decade before that it got a new handle.
NEWS
June 8, 2013
The good news, such as it is, from the American Civil Liberties Union's report on racial bias in marijuana enforcement is that blacks in Maryland are only about 2.9 times more likely to be arrested for possession of the drug than whites. That's actually somewhat better than the national average. The bad news: Maryland was No. 3 among the states in per-capita arrests for marijuana possession in 2010, the last year for which data are available. Baltimore City had the fifth-highest number of arrests of African-Americans on marijuana possession charges among large counties (or in our case, county equivalents)
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 28, 2013
I can only hope that the scourge of racism is finally purged from Stewartstown and Pinkham's Grant. These are two of 10 New Hampshire towns covered by Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which requires local officials to get permission, or "preclearance," on any changes to their election laws. Stewartstown has just over a thousand souls in it and is 99 percent white. In 1970, when it was put under the authority of Section 5, the census listed two blacks out of its 1,008 residents.
NEWS
By Michael Higginbotham | January 23, 2013
Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the death of Baltimore-born Thurgood Marshall, the civil rights lawyer and first black Supreme Court justice who was instrumental in ending Jim Crow segregation. His representation of schoolgirl Linda Brown resulted in the landmark 1954 Supreme Court ruling Brown v. Board of Education, which ended separation practiced in a wide variety of public facilities and institutions. Yet Marshall sought more than just desegregation. Explaining his vision, Marshall proclaimed that "a child born to a black mother in a state like Mississippi … has exactly the same rights as a white baby born to the wealthiest person in the United States.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom have tackled the perennial American heartache in their massive, comprehensive new book, "America in Black and White: One Nation Indivisible."From the founding of this republic and the compromises this "peculiar institution" required, on through the horrible Civil War and the civil rights movement, the thread of race has run through our history -- and it is inseparable from the history and destiny of this country.In the wake of the O.J. Simpson trial, the Yankel Rosenbaum murder and the Million Man March, the Thernstrom book is particularly well-timed.
NEWS
By Peter Kumpa | January 21, 1991
JIM CROW was an old Baltimore slave who made history. Inadvertently. He had the most menial of tasks, sweeping out stables. But the deformed old man had magic in his soul. He was a musical genius, though others would copy him and get the credit for it.It was in 1818 that Thomas Dartmouth Rice, better known as "Daddy" Rice, came to Baltimore with one of the early traveling blackface minstrel shows. There was a constant demand for new songs and routines. Rice, sometimes called PeterKumpa"the crown prince" of minstrels, made many popular and famous.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 24, 2012
When will liberals stop living in the past? Specifically, when will they accept that they aren't all that stands between a wonderful, tolerant America and Jim Crow? I was in the room when, during the Democratic National Convention, civil rights hero John Lewis suggested that Republicans wanted to "go back" to the days when black men like him could be beaten in the street by the enforcers of Jim Crow. I thought it an outrageous and disgusting bit of demagoguery. The audience of Democratic delegates cheered in a riot of self-congratulation.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 7, 2012
Kemba Smith Pradia went to Tallahassee, Fla., last week to demand the right to vote. Back in the '90s, when she was just Kemba Smith, she became a poster child for the excesses and inanities of the so-called War on Drugs. Ms. Pradia, then a college student in Virginia, became involved with, and terrorized by, a man who choked and punched her regularly and viciously. By the impenetrable logic of battered women, she thought it was her fault. The boyfriend was a drug dealer. Pradia never handled drugs, never used drugs, never sold drugs.
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