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By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 2, 2003
My husband and I have a disagreement about garlic that I hope you can settle. Once fresh garlic has sprouted those little green shoots, can you still use it? The real disagreement should have been about who was responsible for putting the garlic where it wouldn't be found for six months. The good news is that you actually can use it after it has sprouted shoots. Because it is older, the flavor is more intense, so you can cut down on the amount you use. Really old garlic can be bitter, though.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 2, 2003
My husband and I have a disagreement about garlic that I hope you can settle. Once fresh garlic has sprouted those little green shoots, can you still use it? The real disagreement should have been about who was responsible for putting the garlic where it wouldn't be found for six months. The good news is that you actually can use it after it has sprouted shoots. Because it is older, the flavor is more intense, so you can cut down on the amount you use. Really old garlic can be bitter, though.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 24, 2002
Q. Why do onions on hoagies and at salad bars always taste so much better (sweeter and milder) than the ones I buy? Is there something special that restaurants do to onions that I don't know about? Do they let them sit or soak them in water? A. No, restaurants do not have a military secret about onions, pre-soaked or otherwise. I do have two theories about why you think restaurant onions taste better: No. 1, you didn't have to slice them. Things always taste better when someone else does the work.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 24, 2002
Q. Why do onions on hoagies and at salad bars always taste so much better (sweeter and milder) than the ones I buy? Is there something special that restaurants do to onions that I don't know about? Do they let them sit or soak them in water? A. No, restaurants do not have a military secret about onions, pre-soaked or otherwise. I do have two theories about why you think restaurant onions taste better: No. 1, you didn't have to slice them. Things always taste better when someone else does the work.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 6, 2003
Can I Dissolve Gelatin in the Microwave? Man, are we too busy these days. This reminds me of the comedian who quotes the microwave directions on the back of a box of Pop-Tarts. It actually says to microwave those gourmet delights for three seconds -- yes, three seconds -- because who has time in their warp-speed lives to wait a minute and a half for them to cook in the toaster. So I guess if dissolving gelatin the old-fashioned way just doesn't fit into your hectic schedule, then yes, you can use the microwave to speed up the process.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 3, 1998
The fine-tuning for the World Championships begins tomorrow for the U.S. women's Olympic volleyball team.That's when the United States, ranked No. 7 in the world, plays No. 12 Peru at 2 p.m. at UMBC Fieldhouse. It's the opening leg of a five-match, three-city East Coast tour that will serve as preparation for next month's World Championships in Japan as well as the 2000 Summer Olympics."We're building a team and right now, we're in the middle of the process," said Jim Coleman, the team's general manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 28, 1999
Carrying a tune wasn't a criteria for playing a famous opera role at the 26th annual Annapolis Opera Gala. Instead of formal wear, some of the 125 guests came in costumes (rented from the opera company) to the benefit at the U.S. Naval Academy Officers Club.Opera president Anna Marie Darlington-Gilmour took on "Tosca" togs. Opera guild president Frances O'Brien was made up as Madame Butterfly. Anne Arundel Community College adjunct professor Mary Coleman and naval architect Jim Coleman borrowed from "La Boheme," as did silent auction co-chair Lesley Robinson.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 19, 2002
Q. I make the best cheesecakes in the world, but they are always split in the middle. I bake them at 350 degrees for 1 1/2 hours in a bath until the center is set. Please help! A. First of all, if you make the best cheesecakes in the world and someone other than you is griping about them, they have a lot of nerve. Now, if it is you who can't sleep at night because of split cheesecakes, my suggestion is relax! It's the flavor that counts. How about that for some help? OK, let's see what we can really do about this splitting problem.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | November 16, 2003
Can I make lasagna one day, and then cook it the next day? Not only is lasagna an ideal meal to prepare today and cook tomorrow, it's great to prepare today, freeze, and cook next month. The only thing you need to be careful about is proper storage. If you are planning to cook it with a day or two, place the prepared lasagna in an airtight container. If you are freezing it, first wrap the pan in plastic wrap and then wrap tightly again in foil. You need that plastic wrapp first so the acids in the tomato sauce don't start to break down the foil.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 23, 2002
Q. I want to try a couple of recipes that call for Japanese bread crumbs, but have had a hard time finding this product. Do they have another name? Where can I buy them? Can I substitute something else for them? A. This trendy Japanese item is also known as panko bread crumbs. They have become very in over the past 10 years and, as with all things that become popular, they have become overused. I knew that line had been crossed when I saw "Panko-Crusted Southern Fried Chicken" on a menu.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 10, 2002
I have heard that when a potato starts turning green it is poisonous. The manager at my local supermarket says that is not true. What is the real answer? Green potatoes won't kill you. That green part, which is called solanine, would have to be consumed in such large quantities to do any harm that you don't really have to worry about it. Now the real concern about solanine, which, by the way, happens when potatoes are exposed to sunlight or even store light, is that the affected part of the potato develops a bitter taste.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 9, 2002
Q. My wife says wooden cutting boards are better and safer than those made out of plastic. I say plastic cutting boards are the way to go. What is your opinion? A. What do I say? I say cutting boards are not worth a family argument. Money, the in-laws, sports -- now there are some topics worthy of a disagreement. But cutting boards? One reason I want you to back off is that your wife is actually right. The latest research shows that for some reason bacteria like salmonella will thrive on plastic boards while it is more likely to die off on wooden ones.
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