Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJim Clark
IN THE NEWS

Jim Clark

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 28, 2000
James Clark, Jr., former president of the Maryland Senate, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator." My mother, Alda Tyson Hopkins, was born on 13 March 1891 at White Hall at Highland, Maryland. White Hall in Highland was the farm of Samuel Hopkins and his wife, Martha Smith Hopkins. They named it after the original White Hall in Anne Arundel County, which was the birthplace of Johns Hopkins and my mother's grandfather, Joseph Janney Hopkins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
William Bowling watched from two seats away as Dan Clark got out of his seat and walked into the aisle of M&T Bank Stadium's Section 521 during the Ravens game Sunday. Bowling said he was close enough to reach out and grab him - and he would have, if he had known what was going to happen next. Clark, 48, took a step, dropped the phone in his hand and fell down the flight of steps in the stadium's upper deck during the Ravens game against the New York Jets, turning and hitting the back of his head on the platform at the bottom of the section, Bowling said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
William Bowling watched from two seats away as Dan Clark got out of his seat and walked into the aisle of M&T Bank Stadium's Section 521 during the Ravens game Sunday. Bowling said he was close enough to reach out and grab him - and he would have, if he had known what was going to happen next. Clark, 48, took a step, dropped the phone in his hand and fell down the flight of steps in the stadium's upper deck during the Ravens game against the New York Jets, turning and hitting the back of his head on the platform at the bottom of the section, Bowling said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
A man remains in serious condition at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center after falling and hitting his head at M&T Bank Stadium during the Ravens-Jets game Sunday. The man's brother identified him as Dan Clark, 48, of Ferndale. Clark fell on the steps in upper deck inside the seating bowl, team spokesman Kevin Byrne said in an email response. The circumstances leading to the incident are unclear, and initial information incorrectly stated he may have fallen out of the upper deck.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
JIM CLARK, 84 Confronted rights marchers Former Dallas County (Ala.) Sheriff Jim Clark, whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma in 1965 shocked the nation and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health due to a stroke and heart surgery, Hayes Funeral Home officials said. Mr. Clark was voted out of office in 1966 in large measure because of opposition from newly registered black voters, but throughout his life he maintained he had done the right thing.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
James Clark Jr., who served in the Maryland legislature, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator," reprinted with permission. I was born at approximately eight o'clock in the morning of 19 December 1918 in the southwest bedroom at Keewaydin. This was just a few weeks after the Armistice that ended World War I and in the middle of the great flu epidemic, that killed 25,000,000 people worldwide during the winter of 1918-1919.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
A man remains in serious condition at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center after falling and hitting his head at M&T Bank Stadium during the Ravens-Jets game Sunday. The man's brother identified him as Dan Clark, 48, of Ferndale. Clark fell on the steps in upper deck inside the seating bowl, team spokesman Kevin Byrne said in an email response. The circumstances leading to the incident are unclear, and initial information incorrectly stated he may have fallen out of the upper deck.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 13, 1995
Havre de Grace -- The Democratic Party used to provide a pretty big tent. While some of its more fractious members might bolt from time to time, they almost always returned, and room was made for them. That was a source of the party's strength.But even in what used to be one-party Maryland, it's not the case any longer. Today the once-powerful party is melting away before our eyes like the witch in ''The Wizard of Oz.'' Almost daily, it seems, Democratic politicians resign, retire or announce a change of parties.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Close to the southeastern fringe of 540 acres of rolling farmland, Martha Anne Clark lives in the Ellicott City farmhouse where she grew up, the same house where her father, state Sen. James Clark Jr., resided for nearly 50 years until his death in 2006. In another house on the property lives her 24-year-old daughter, Nora Crist, who has introduced pigs and chickens to the working farm on Clarksville Pike for the first time in its 214-year history. And just over a grassy knoll or two in the other direction is the petting farm Clark opened 10 years ago with her father's enthusiastic support.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | August 25, 1995
As shop owners and longtime area residents, Mary and Jim Clark have many reasons to sing the praises of the Mount Airy community.In November 1993, the couple opened their cassette tape and compact disc retail store, Face the Music, in Twin Arch Shopping Center. The opening was the result of a one-year study done by Mrs. Clark about owning a business. A music store was touted as one of the most promising businesses by several sources.Thanks to community patronage, "it's growing and going in the right direction," Mrs. Clark said.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Close to the southeastern fringe of 540 acres of rolling farmland, Martha Anne Clark lives in the Ellicott City farmhouse where she grew up, the same house where her father, state Sen. James Clark Jr., resided for nearly 50 years until his death in 2006. In another house on the property lives her 24-year-old daughter, Nora Crist, who has introduced pigs and chickens to the working farm on Clarksville Pike for the first time in its 214-year history. And just over a grassy knoll or two in the other direction is the petting farm Clark opened 10 years ago with her father's enthusiastic support.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 2010
I've lived on the Chesapeake Bay for longer than I have lived anywhere else in my life, but I am not a sailor, nor a fisherman nor a waterman, so I have not made more use of its astonishing natural beauty than the occasional boat ride with friends or trips to the shore. It is a deficiency that deserves correcting in any case, but especially as we watch a kindred body of water down south destroyed by the worst oil drilling disaster of all time. So, when my friend Betsy invited a handful of women friends to meet the fisherman who has been her husband's best friend and fishing pal since elementary school and to see the Eastern Shore of Virginia through his eyes, and on his boat, it was easy to say yes. We traveled to Cape Charles in Northampton County, on the tip of Virginia's Eastern Shore, and unloaded our shorts, T-shirts, cameras, shell-collecting bags and wine at Sterling House, a bed & breakfast graciously restored by Steve Hairfield in a town full of such houses.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
JIM CLARK, 84 Confronted rights marchers Former Dallas County (Ala.) Sheriff Jim Clark, whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma in 1965 shocked the nation and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health due to a stroke and heart surgery, Hayes Funeral Home officials said. Mr. Clark was voted out of office in 1966 in large measure because of opposition from newly registered black voters, but throughout his life he maintained he had done the right thing.
NEWS
November 28, 2000
James Clark, Jr., former president of the Maryland Senate, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator." My mother, Alda Tyson Hopkins, was born on 13 March 1891 at White Hall at Highland, Maryland. White Hall in Highland was the farm of Samuel Hopkins and his wife, Martha Smith Hopkins. They named it after the original White Hall in Anne Arundel County, which was the birthplace of Johns Hopkins and my mother's grandfather, Joseph Janney Hopkins.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
James Clark Jr., who served in the Maryland legislature, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator," reprinted with permission. I was born at approximately eight o'clock in the morning of 19 December 1918 in the southwest bedroom at Keewaydin. This was just a few weeks after the Armistice that ended World War I and in the middle of the great flu epidemic, that killed 25,000,000 people worldwide during the winter of 1918-1919.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | August 25, 1995
As shop owners and longtime area residents, Mary and Jim Clark have many reasons to sing the praises of the Mount Airy community.In November 1993, the couple opened their cassette tape and compact disc retail store, Face the Music, in Twin Arch Shopping Center. The opening was the result of a one-year study done by Mrs. Clark about owning a business. A music store was touted as one of the most promising businesses by several sources.Thanks to community patronage, "it's growing and going in the right direction," Mrs. Clark said.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 2010
I've lived on the Chesapeake Bay for longer than I have lived anywhere else in my life, but I am not a sailor, nor a fisherman nor a waterman, so I have not made more use of its astonishing natural beauty than the occasional boat ride with friends or trips to the shore. It is a deficiency that deserves correcting in any case, but especially as we watch a kindred body of water down south destroyed by the worst oil drilling disaster of all time. So, when my friend Betsy invited a handful of women friends to meet the fisherman who has been her husband's best friend and fishing pal since elementary school and to see the Eastern Shore of Virginia through his eyes, and on his boat, it was easy to say yes. We traveled to Cape Charles in Northampton County, on the tip of Virginia's Eastern Shore, and unloaded our shorts, T-shirts, cameras, shell-collecting bags and wine at Sterling House, a bed & breakfast graciously restored by Steve Hairfield in a town full of such houses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 27, 1999
It was one big, happy, family that turned out for the dedication of the Clifton Mansion Tower in Baltimore's Clifton Park. About 40 of the 200 people present were descendants of Johns Hopkins, who bought the Clifton Mansion in 1836 and used it as his summer home.The tower was dedicated to Samuel Hopkins, Johns Hopkins' great-great-nephew, past president and member of the Baltimore City Board of Recreation and Parks, and current board member of Civic Works. Both organizations sponsored the ceremony and reception.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 13, 1995
Havre de Grace -- The Democratic Party used to provide a pretty big tent. While some of its more fractious members might bolt from time to time, they almost always returned, and room was made for them. That was a source of the party's strength.But even in what used to be one-party Maryland, it's not the case any longer. Today the once-powerful party is melting away before our eyes like the witch in ''The Wizard of Oz.'' Almost daily, it seems, Democratic politicians resign, retire or announce a change of parties.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.