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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 19, 2000
For parents who fear that their Ritalin-proof teens may follow Dr. Seuss' "Hop on Pop" admonition straight through to patricide - help is on its way. Just plunk the kids down in the den and turn on the tube. Hello, "WWF Smackdown," and goodbye juvenile delinquency! That, anyway, is the marvelously counter-intuitive notion of Jib Fowler, a communications professor at the University of Houston's Clear Lake campus, a lone soul defending the beleaguered television executive. The professor argues that, more than three decades of social research notwithstanding, there is little actual proof of any connection between the violent images that appear on television and the increase in violence in American society since the advent of TV. Instead, Fowler contends, the violence we see on TV is good for us as a country, and particularly for impressionable adolescents.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,sun reporter | July 9, 2007
In May 2005, a Bolton Hill photographer emotionally paralyzed by tragedy - he had recently lost his second wife to breast cancer, three years after his first succumbed to the disease - went to an open house at the Inner Harbor's sailing club. "I was absorbed in my own grief," Allen Polansky said. "But as soon as I got on the boat, it was an instant change of focus, a way for me to reconnect with the world." Yesterday, Polansky, 59, returned the favor. Along with other skippers of the Downtown Sailing Center, he took several dozen prospective sailors for free 40-minute tours of the Inner Harbor, in the hopes of interesting more Marylanders in the breezy pleasures - and unusual challenges - of tacking around a working harbor.
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SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1997
Although the Whitbread Round the World Race rules permit each boat to carry two mainsails, the strategists for Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the race, have decided to go with just one on Leg 3, which begins Saturday in Fremantle, Australia.Dave Scott, a watch captain aboard Chessie and a sailmaker from North Sails, said the trend will be to use lighter sails on the Fremantle-to-Sydney leg than were used in the Southern Ocean on Leg 2."The weight of these [mainsails], anywhere from 75 to 105 kilos [165 to 231 pounds]
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 13, 2005
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. - In a bizarre and potentially tragic situation yesterday, a huge limb broke off from a red oak tree by the fourth green at Baltusrol Golf Club during the second round of the 87th PGA Championship, falling some 40 feet and injuring three people. Frank Choy, a freelance audio technician for Turner Sports, suffered trauma to the left leg and was taken to a local hospital, where he was reported to be in stable condition. Bob Welsch, who was working as a freelance camera jib operator for CBS Sports, sustained abrasions on his left arm. He was treated on site and released.
SPORTS
By Marty Klinkenberg and Marty Klinkenberg,Knight-Ridder | May 15, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- Jerry Kirby has raced sailboats for 22 years and has witnessed too many mishaps to mention.But never has he been party to a situation as potentially damaging as yesterday, when America3 averted defeat in the America's Cup and one of its crew members barely escaped serious injury.America3 pulled to within one victory of winning the America's Cup with a one-minute, four-second triumph over Il Moro di Venezia of Italy. But not without a near disaster."You can say we were pretty lucky," said Kirby, 35, the America bowman.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | August 13, 2005
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. - In a bizarre and potentially tragic situation yesterday, a huge limb broke off from a red oak tree by the fourth green at Baltusrol Golf Club during the second round of the 87th PGA Championship, falling some 40 feet and injuring three people. Frank Choy, a freelance audio technician for Turner Sports, suffered trauma to the left leg and was taken to a local hospital, where he was reported to be in stable condition. Bob Welsch, who was working as a freelance camera jib operator for CBS Sports, sustained abrasions on his left arm. He was treated on site and released.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
It was a great weekend for sailors who call the Chesapeake Bay home. Maryland racers yesterday won 13 of 19 classes in the National Offshore One Design regatta held off Annapolis, a stop on one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious circuits. Scott Nixon of Annapolis led the 81-boat J/22 fleet in points in each of the three days of sailing. The St. Mary's College graduate said his strategy going into the final day's single race was to "stay close to Henry Filter and David Van Cleef," the local skippers in second and third place.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,sun reporter | July 9, 2007
In May 2005, a Bolton Hill photographer emotionally paralyzed by tragedy - he had recently lost his second wife to breast cancer, three years after his first succumbed to the disease - went to an open house at the Inner Harbor's sailing club. "I was absorbed in my own grief," Allen Polansky said. "But as soon as I got on the boat, it was an instant change of focus, a way for me to reconnect with the world." Yesterday, Polansky, 59, returned the favor. Along with other skippers of the Downtown Sailing Center, he took several dozen prospective sailors for free 40-minute tours of the Inner Harbor, in the hopes of interesting more Marylanders in the breezy pleasures - and unusual challenges - of tacking around a working harbor.
NEWS
September 5, 1992
The Care and Feeding of the Gulf War MediaI take exception to Michael Hill's assessment of the gulf war coverage (Perspective, The Sunday Sun, Aug. 2).So many reports, after the fact, have been put forward decrying the coverage of this war that it boggles the mind. Many of these reports are by persons and reporters who never served time in eastern Saudi Arabia or Kuwait.I did. I also was one of these so- called "military minders" working for the Joint Information Bureau (JIB) in the Dhahran International Hotel.
NEWS
October 7, 1993
The prolonged recession has hit many Americans hard, but this is a nation that never stands still for long. After enough bad news, optimism picks up. One person's misery becomes another's opportunity. America moves on.This upturn of mood can certainly be detected in the preparations for this year's U.S. Sailboat Show, which today begins its 24th annual run at the Annapolis City Dock and goes through Sunday.Truth be told, the optimism isn't just renewed American spirit kicking in. This is the first sailboat show since the repeal of a 10 percent federal luxury tax on yachts which hit this important Chesapeake-area industry so hard.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
It was a great weekend for sailors who call the Chesapeake Bay home. Maryland racers yesterday won 13 of 19 classes in the National Offshore One Design regatta held off Annapolis, a stop on one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious circuits. Scott Nixon of Annapolis led the 81-boat J/22 fleet in points in each of the three days of sailing. The St. Mary's College graduate said his strategy going into the final day's single race was to "stay close to Henry Filter and David Van Cleef," the local skippers in second and third place.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | July 19, 2000
For parents who fear that their Ritalin-proof teens may follow Dr. Seuss' "Hop on Pop" admonition straight through to patricide - help is on its way. Just plunk the kids down in the den and turn on the tube. Hello, "WWF Smackdown," and goodbye juvenile delinquency! That, anyway, is the marvelously counter-intuitive notion of Jib Fowler, a communications professor at the University of Houston's Clear Lake campus, a lone soul defending the beleaguered television executive. The professor argues that, more than three decades of social research notwithstanding, there is little actual proof of any connection between the violent images that appear on television and the increase in violence in American society since the advent of TV. Instead, Fowler contends, the violence we see on TV is good for us as a country, and particularly for impressionable adolescents.
SPORTS
By Bruce Stannard and Bruce Stannard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1997
Although the Whitbread Round the World Race rules permit each boat to carry two mainsails, the strategists for Chessie Racing, the Maryland entry in the race, have decided to go with just one on Leg 3, which begins Saturday in Fremantle, Australia.Dave Scott, a watch captain aboard Chessie and a sailmaker from North Sails, said the trend will be to use lighter sails on the Fremantle-to-Sydney leg than were used in the Southern Ocean on Leg 2."The weight of these [mainsails], anywhere from 75 to 105 kilos [165 to 231 pounds]
NEWS
October 7, 1993
The prolonged recession has hit many Americans hard, but this is a nation that never stands still for long. After enough bad news, optimism picks up. One person's misery becomes another's opportunity. America moves on.This upturn of mood can certainly be detected in the preparations for this year's U.S. Sailboat Show, which today begins its 24th annual run at the Annapolis City Dock and goes through Sunday.Truth be told, the optimism isn't just renewed American spirit kicking in. This is the first sailboat show since the repeal of a 10 percent federal luxury tax on yachts which hit this important Chesapeake-area industry so hard.
NEWS
September 5, 1992
The Care and Feeding of the Gulf War MediaI take exception to Michael Hill's assessment of the gulf war coverage (Perspective, The Sunday Sun, Aug. 2).So many reports, after the fact, have been put forward decrying the coverage of this war that it boggles the mind. Many of these reports are by persons and reporters who never served time in eastern Saudi Arabia or Kuwait.I did. I also was one of these so- called "military minders" working for the Joint Information Bureau (JIB) in the Dhahran International Hotel.
SPORTS
By Marty Klinkenberg and Marty Klinkenberg,Knight-Ridder | May 15, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- Jerry Kirby has raced sailboats for 22 years and has witnessed too many mishaps to mention.But never has he been party to a situation as potentially damaging as yesterday, when America3 averted defeat in the America's Cup and one of its crew members barely escaped serious injury.America3 pulled to within one victory of winning the America's Cup with a one-minute, four-second triumph over Il Moro di Venezia of Italy. But not without a near disaster."You can say we were pretty lucky," said Kirby, 35, the America bowman.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | May 15, 1992
SAN DIEGO -- At the end of the sixth leg of Race 4 of the America's Cup yesterday, it appeared that the U.S. team had completed a poor gennaker takedown.This time, however, there was a twist -- 28-year-old grinder Peter Fennelly of Colonia, N.J., was caught up in the confusion of sails and line.A jib sheet was wrapped around Fennelly's leg. He was trapped at the edge of the deck and in danger of going overboard at a crucial point of the race."As we were about to go to the leeward mark my responsibility is to take out the reaching strut, which is short pole, and put it in its bracket," Fennelly said, while describing what the America3 crew calls the Mexican Drop.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
GEORGE S. BLOME, JR. who was called Geo by family and friends, died in his sleep in Sarasota, FL on November 27, 2006. A native of Baltimore, MD, Geo graduated from Polytechnic High School in 1941, where he played Varsity Lacross and was a swimmer. Before graduating from Johns Hopkins in 1947, Geo enlisted in WWII Navy Program at Cornell U. He spent 18 months on minesweepers in Japan. Recalled to active duty in the Korean War was Lt. Commander-Naval Reserve, Geo worked for the Supervisor of Shipbuilding in NYC and Baltimore.
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