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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
More than 6 million children die annually around the globe from largely preventable problems such as diarrhea and pneumonia, but a $500 million, five-year effort led by the Baltimore-based nonprofit Jhpiego aims to put a big dent in those statistics. The money is the second-largest award the Johns Hopkins University affiliate has ever managed and is the flagship grant this year from the U.S. Agency for International Development, the nation's foreign aid bureau that spends $1.5 billion annually to prevent mother and baby deaths in poor countries.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
More than 6 million children die annually around the globe from largely preventable problems such as diarrhea and pneumonia, but a $500 million, five-year effort led by the Baltimore-based nonprofit Jhpiego aims to put a big dent in those statistics. The money is the second-largest award the Johns Hopkins University affiliate has ever managed and is the flagship grant this year from the U.S. Agency for International Development, the nation's foreign aid bureau that spends $1.5 billion annually to prevent mother and baby deaths in poor countries.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
A Johns Hopkins-affiliated public health organization has received a $75 million federal grant to help reduce the number of childbirth-related deaths in developing countries. JHPIEGO, a Fells Point-based nonprofit that focuses on the health of women and families, is to announce today a five-year award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The money will be used primarily to train local nurses, doctors and midwives in developing nations in low-cost lifesaving techniques ranging from infection control to preventing postpartum hemorrhage.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Leslie Mancuso has been at the helm of Jhpiego, an international health affiliate of the Johns Hopkins University, for more than a decade. Under her leadership, the Fells Point-based organization has expanded significantly. The nonprofit's budget has multiplied nearly 50 times and its staff has increased ninefold. Most of those employees are located in outposts around the world. But the organization's mission has remained constant. Working with local governments and community leaders, Jhpiego trains health professionals and develops economical methods to improve care.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Leslie Mancuso has been at the helm of Jhpiego, an international health affiliate of the Johns Hopkins University, for more than a decade. Under her leadership, the Fells Point-based organization has expanded significantly. The nonprofit's budget has multiplied nearly 50 times and its staff has increased ninefold. Most of those employees are located in outposts around the world. But the organization's mission has remained constant. Working with local governments and community leaders, Jhpiego trains health professionals and develops economical methods to improve care.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 20, 2010
With a light snow falling outside, three health care workers from the Baltimore-based aid group Jhpiego were busy repacking their bags inside BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport to make sure the mosquito repellent, sunscreen and water purifiers could all fit. The trio were headed to earthquake-ravaged Haiti on an 8 a.m. flight this morning, and they didn't want to leave anything behind. They knew their colleagues on the ground were counting on them to bring supplies to treat the needy and food and other basic necessities for them.
NEWS
By Leslie Mancuso | March 1, 2009
Last week, the low-budget film Slumdog Millionaire received eight Academy Awards, including Best Film. Slumdog tells a story of success and love of a child from the slums of Mumbai, India. It warmed the hearts of the world. But in reality, most slum-dwellers continue to face desperate living and health conditions. The international health community knows that most slum stories do not have a happy ending. Experts agree that the world is rapidly urbanizing: Three of five people are expected to live in urban areas within the next 25 years, and 95 percent of urban growth will be in the developing world - with most of that growth occurring in slums.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 8, 2007
Dr. Leslie Mancuso, 50, is a world traveler, but most of her destinations are not exactly haute couture hotspots. "I just got back from Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. I leave in a month for Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa," says Mancuso, the head of JHPIEGO (pronounced ja-pie-go), a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health group that focuses on improving access to medical care for women and families in developing countries. "We're the jewel of Baltimore, and we've been here for nearly 35 years," says Mancuso, who joined JHPIEGO five years ago and lives in Fells Point with her husband.
NEWS
By Donna Owens and Donna Owens,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2008
It's a crisp fall day at Waverly Elementary School in Northeast Baltimore. It's about an hour or so before lunch, and the building perched on a hill is humming with activity. Upstairs in Room 223, about two dozen students in green and khaki uniforms are seated inside the homeroom of fifth-grade teacher Cynthia Rock. Cut-out stars and likenesses of Peanuts characters cover the walls and doors, along with graded test papers. A banner above a chalkboard reads: "Never settle for less than your best."
NEWS
By Ellie Dominguez and Madison Farley | October 11, 2012
Thursday marks the International Day of the Girl. As part of Garrison Forest School's Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) partnership with the Johns Hopkins University, we spent this past spring and summer as the first interns at Jhpiego, the JHU-affiliated nonprofit addressing health issues of girls, women and their families worldwide. We talked via email and Skype with girls around the globe and discovered just how similar our perspectives are. The GirlSpot posts we wrote for the Jhpiego Facebook page detail these common bonds — and highlight the differences in our lives, differences that often have tragic consequences for our global peers.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 20, 2010
With a light snow falling outside, three health care workers from the Baltimore-based aid group Jhpiego were busy repacking their bags inside BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport to make sure the mosquito repellent, sunscreen and water purifiers could all fit. The trio were headed to earthquake-ravaged Haiti on an 8 a.m. flight this morning, and they didn't want to leave anything behind. They knew their colleagues on the ground were counting on them to bring supplies to treat the needy and food and other basic necessities for them.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
A Johns Hopkins-affiliated public health organization has received a $75 million federal grant to help reduce the number of childbirth-related deaths in developing countries. JHPIEGO, a Fells Point-based nonprofit that focuses on the health of women and families, is to announce today a five-year award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The money will be used primarily to train local nurses, doctors and midwives in developing nations in low-cost lifesaving techniques ranging from infection control to preventing postpartum hemorrhage.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
As early as Friday, a group of Baltimore-based aid workers from a Johns Hopkins University affiliate plan to land in earthquake-ravaged Haiti and join others from the region and the United States in taking the first steps beyond the rescues. They'll start rebuilding. The mission of the trio from Jhpiego is to re-establish a system that connects pregnant women and newborns with proper care - no small task in a devastated city now facing aftershocks and increasingly desperate people short of medical care, food and water.
NEWS
By Marion Subah | August 19, 2014
Monrovia, Liberia - We sat in a waiting room of a health clinic here, talking about our fears. As a midwifery and nursing educator working in Liberia for Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins University affiliate, I had been asked to help update health workers on the critical skills and interventions essential to managing Ebola cases. I was prepared to talk about the disease - what it is, how to care for patients and how to prevent it from spreading. But before I could do that, I knew we had to talk about how terrifying the job is. A nurse sitting across from me spoke candidly about his first experience with an Ebola patient - he didn't want to have any physical contact with the person, he was so terrified.
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