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NEWS
November 18, 2011
In less than one week, this nation will remember the assassination of President John F. Kennedy exactly 48 years ago. It would serve the nation well if members of Congress would recall the immortal words President Kennedy spoke on Jan. 20, 1961: "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country. " Congress needs to restrain the spending and reel in this nation's debt. That would serve this country better than any other single item on the agenda of Congress or President Barack Obama.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Atholton High School's Miles Walker recently captured the state's top prize in an American Legion national government instruction program, an accomplishment that for the 16-year-old rising senior was nearly a lifetime in the making. The Columbia resident was an infant when his mother, Lisa Walker Woodyard, first read about the Boys State program in the memoir of President Bill Clinton, who attended as a 16-year-old himself. The regimented instruction program was launched by the American Legion in 1935 to counter the Soviet Union's Young Pioneer camps and according to the American Legion strives to teach civic duty via role playing as state and local politicians.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 6, 2012
It's hard to shock people with stories of JFK's womanizing, but a new tell-all book by Mimi Alford may just do that. Alford says she was just 19 when she started a White House internship and began a sexual affair with president John F. Kennedy. She details the allegations in "Once Upon a Secret: My Affair with President John F. Kennedy. " She told NBC's Meredith Vieira that after her freshman year at Wheaton College she lost her virginity to the president in the first lady's bedroom.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
It's a fitful dream, one that has haunted Dick Nowak for 50 years. In it, Army's football team has the ball on Navy's 2-yard line. Trailing by six points, Nowak and the Cadets line up to run a final play as precious seconds tick away. And then? Time runs out - and Nowak wakes up. “The ending is always the same,” he said resignedly. “We never get the play off.” The dream is all too real. In 1963, that's how Army lost to Navy, 21-15, in a game deeply etched in the lore of their 144-year rivalry.
NEWS
March 17, 1998
THERE IS A big difference between the disputed items in Robert L. White's collection of John F. Kennedy memorabilia, set for auction tomorrow, and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' possessions, which brought her children millions at auction. Hers were purely personal items -- pillows, jewelry, drawings. But some of the artifacts Mr. White wants to sell are part of our national heritage.Material pertaining to the business of government -- even scribbles -- are, by law, U.S. property. But in Kennedy's day, no mechanism existed for determining what items made up the presidential record.
NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
If it had kept raining in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, would it have changed history? Several books and articles have pondered this question. President John F Kennedy greeted a crowd on a misty morning rain in Fort Worth at 8:45 a.m. central standard time. The weather in Dallas had been rainy, but the sun came out before the president's plane had landed. The plexiglass "bubble" top had been removed from the car. The Secret Service knew the president preferred not to use the bubble, unless it was inclement weather, according to media reports.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Why did columnist Thomas F. Schaller leave out the privileged John F. Kennedy as one of the presidents since World War lI who worked successfully on behalf of working-class Americans ("The virtues of a president with humble origins," Oct. 31)? Was it because Kennedy's example does not advance Mr. Schaller's liberal ideology ? It continues to fascinate me that the left - not to mention President Obama and Vice President Joe Biden - continues to take credit for what Seal Team 6 pulled off, but obfuscates the facts surrounding the murder of a U.S. ambassador by al-Qaida or similar terrorist group in Libya.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Richard Sher's "Square Off" Sunday features a panel of Marylanders, including Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, marking the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK. In addition to John F, Kennedy's niece who served as Maryland's lieutenant governor, "JFK 50 Years Later" includes: Gov. Martin O'Malley, the Rev. Frank M. Reid, III, Ted Venetoulis and Michael Olesker. The show airs at 11 a.m. on WMAR (Channel 2). #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In his new thriller, "The Third Bullet," novelist Stephen Hunter sets his sights on an American tragedy that's also the most famous gun mystery of all time - the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The questions surrounding the shooting as JFK rode in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have never been fully put to rest. And the controversy is certain to intensify as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches this fall. As the novelist tells it, the decision to enlist his fictitious super-sniper, Bob Lee Swagger, to determine whether the gunman acted alone or as part of a conspiracy began as a joke.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
Stanley F. Stearns, the photographer who captured the image of a young John F. Kennedy Jr. saluting his late father, a picture that instantly evokes memories of the Camelot era, died of lung cancer Friday at Hospice of the Chesapeake in Harwood, his family said. He was 76. A former United Press International photographer who later ran a studio for 40 years in his native Annapolis, Mr. Stearns snapped the president's son outside a Washington cathedral as the family left the funeral Mass on Nov. 25, 1963.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
From the pages of the Aegis 50 of years ago this week. The Northeastern Expressway was expected to be renamed Dec. 11, 1963 to honor the late President John F. Kennedy. The State Roads Commission agreed to rename the expressway for the slain president, pending the family's approval, which was expected to be given. The opening of the highway on Nov.14, 1963 was the last public works project to be dedicated by the president, just eight days before his assassination. The 53 mile section was the last stretch of limited access road between Boston and Washington to be opened on the new Interstate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Richard Sher's "Square Off" Sunday features a panel of Marylanders, including Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, marking the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK. In addition to John F, Kennedy's niece who served as Maryland's lieutenant governor, "JFK 50 Years Later" includes: Gov. Martin O'Malley, the Rev. Frank M. Reid, III, Ted Venetoulis and Michael Olesker. The show airs at 11 a.m. on WMAR (Channel 2). #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
If it had kept raining in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, would it have changed history? Several books and articles have pondered this question. President John F Kennedy greeted a crowd on a misty morning rain in Fort Worth at 8:45 a.m. central standard time. The weather in Dallas had been rainy, but the sun came out before the president's plane had landed. The plexiglass "bubble" top had been removed from the car. The Secret Service knew the president preferred not to use the bubble, unless it was inclement weather, according to media reports.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2013
Among the greatest ironies of President John F. Kennedy's fateful visit to Texas in late November 1963 was that it was a political mission to resolve a rift among Texas Democrats looking toward his own re-election bid in 1964. The chief political beneficiary of Kennedy's assassination was the state's most prominent and powerful Democrat, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. LBJ did not favor the Kennedy trip and essentially was bypassed on the decision to make it. Until the fatal shots were fired as the Kennedy party was driven through downtown Dallas, the principal story line about the visit was whether a feud between liberal Texas Sen. Ralph Yarborough and Gov. John B. Connally, a close Johnson friend, could be smoothed over, to assure Kennedy's re-election in 1964.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Sachs | November 21, 2013
We got the dreadful news of the president's murder at a retirement luncheon at the old House of Welsh for our boss, United States Attorney Joseph Tydings. Stunned and subdued, we straggled back to our fourth floor offices in the nearby United States Post Office and Courthouse. None of us had ever met JFK, but we were unmistakably caught up in the Kennedy call to public service, and we all felt, through Joe, a link to the president. Most of us knew that Joe had been to the White House earlier that week to receive a presidential blessing for his forthcoming campaign for the U.S. Senate.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Fifty years ago Friday, Orioles farmhand Bobby Floyd sat in a dugout, wondering why umpires were huddled grimly at home plate in the fifth inning of a Florida Instructional League game. Quickly, word spread. President John F. Kennedy was dead. In unison, it seemed, players and fans let out a collective gasp. "It was like all the air had been sucked out of the ballpark," Floyd said. Game over. The Baby Birds, as they were called, retreated to their clubhouse - budding stars like Paul Blair, Mark Belanger, Curt Blefary and Andy Etchebarren.
NEWS
December 29, 1991
Was there a conspiracy to murder President John F. Kennedy? The new Oliver Stone movie -- "JFK" -- argues that there was, involving the Secret Service, the CIA, the FBI, the military-industrial complex and just about every other element of the 1960s establishment. Why did they want to kill President Kennedy? Because he had decided to turn soft on communism in his second term, pull out of Vietnam, ease up on Fidel Castro, make friends with Nikita Khrushchev -- in other words, throw the Cold War.The cold, hard fact is, there is no credible evidence of such a conspiracy.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Fred Schumacher knew the race was worse than he thought it would be when he watched a group of Marines climb into a pickup truck and quit after the first few checkpoints. The first JFK 50 Mile race Schumacher ran, on March 30 1974, offered a particularly difficult challenge in the 34-degree weather and steady rain that turned to sleet for part of the event. Schumacher, a 66-year-old retired Army officer from Frederick, said he had decided to start the race out of complete ignorance.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 20, 2013
The assassination of President John F. Kennedy came up one day several years ago, in a jarring way, and at a moment when I least expected it. I was fishing with Bill Burton and Calvert Bregel, two of my older, wiser friends. We were knee-deep in the Gunpowder River, in northern Baltimore County. "You know what?" Calvert said, looking downstream and squinting, as if to dislodge a memory. "I haven't been here in a long time, but I think there used to be a nice covered bridge over this river.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Fred Schumacher knew the race was worse than he thought it would be when he watched a group of Marines climb into a pickup truck and quit after the first few checkpoints. The first JFK 50 Mile race Schumacher ran, on March 30 1974, offered a particularly difficult challenge in the 34-degree weather and steady rain that turned to sleet for part of the event. Schumacher, a 66-year-old retired Army officer from Frederick, said he had decided to start the race out of complete ignorance.
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