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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | January 18, 1994
JERUSALEM -- What could be more Jewish than Israel's menorah?Something less pagan, perhaps, according to some Jewish scholars.The seven-branch candelabrum has been taking a beating lately for its use, and alleged misuse, in Israel.The menorah symbolized on Israel's shekel and printed on all official letterheads is a bit of a fraud, contends Professor Daniel Sperber, former dean of the faculty of Basic Jewish Studies at Bar-Ilan University in Tel Aviv."It's a historical mistake," he said.It seems the base of the menorah used in Israel is copied from an arch in Rome built two millenniums ago, which in turn was most likely copied from a temple in southern Turkey built for the worship of Zeus, the Greek god of the heavens.
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NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | March 5, 2010
J -The Israeli government adds two culturally rich, millennium-old historic sites to a list of national treasures, and riots break out, followed by international condemnation. Yet, it is precisely this cynical, predictable response that demonstrates why Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was right to add the Tomb of Rachel and the Cave of the Patriarchs to Israel's National Heritage Sites. There is no nation with firmer roots in a land than the Jewish people in the greater land of Israel.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 25, 1996
JERUSALEM -- When the Jerusalem city government unsealed a tunnel yesterday that chronicles 2,500 years of history, it enhanced a tourist attraction but also provoked the latest Arab-Israeli dispute over the future of the city.Workmen unsealed the exit of a 500-yard-long tunnel that runs along the edge of the Temple Mount -- where the Jewish Temple once stood and now the site of two of Islam's holiest shrines -- and a crowd of Palestinians responded by throwing stones and bottles at police.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2001
HANUKKAH IS a holiday that celebrates dedication - the re-dedication of the Jewish temple in Jerusalem, after the Maccabees defeated the Syrian-Greeks more than 2,100 years ago, and dedication to the Jewish faith - according to Rabbi Mark Panoff of Temple Isaiah. The Jewish congregation meets at Oakland Mills Interfaith Center. That's why Hanukkah was chosen as the occasion to dedicate the synagogue's new Israeli flag Sunday. The flag was donated in honor of Phyllis Geisler of Oakland Mills, a beloved member of the congregation who died last winter.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2001
HANUKKAH IS a holiday that celebrates dedication - the re-dedication of the Jewish temple in Jerusalem, after the Maccabees defeated the Syrian-Greeks more than 2,100 years ago, and dedication to the Jewish faith - according to Rabbi Mark Panoff of Temple Isaiah. The Jewish congregation meets at Oakland Mills Interfaith Center. That's why Hanukkah was chosen as the occasion to dedicate the synagogue's new Israeli flag Sunday. The flag was donated in honor of Phyllis Geisler of Oakland Mills, a beloved member of the congregation who died last winter.
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | March 5, 2010
J -The Israeli government adds two culturally rich, millennium-old historic sites to a list of national treasures, and riots break out, followed by international condemnation. Yet, it is precisely this cynical, predictable response that demonstrates why Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was right to add the Tomb of Rachel and the Cave of the Patriarchs to Israel's National Heritage Sites. There is no nation with firmer roots in a land than the Jewish people in the greater land of Israel.
TOPIC
By Aron U. Raskas | July 30, 2000
A recent day in the Old City of Jerusalem. An Arab laborer works at the South Wall archeological site. To his north stand the Jewish Temple Mount, the Al Aqsa mosque and the Dome of the Rock; to his south, hundreds of miles away, the Muslim shrine of Mecca. As the time for Muslim prayer arrives, the Arab laborer unfolds his prayer mat. He turns his back on the two mosques previously before him and prostrates himself in prayer to the south. The picture is striking. As the Camp David postmortems continue, while Arab disinformation campaigns work overtime to generate perceptions of moral and historical equivalence between the Palestinian and Jewish perspectives of Jerusalem, and as the U.S. administration blithely apologizes for the Palestinian negotiating position by suggesting that Jerusalem is "at the core of what it means to be a Palestinian," a candid moment like this is particularly telling.
NEWS
December 9, 2001
JUST FOR PARENTS Advice and strategies to help your children read Holiday Hanukkah is a festival of lights Exploring the ways everyone has of celebrating together at this time of the year helps people feel connected to each other during the holiday season. Tonight Jews around the world will celebrate the first night of Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights. This holiday commemorates events that took place over 2,300 years ago in the land of Judea, which is now Israel. Long ago the Syrian King, Antiochus, ordered the Jewish people to reject their God, their religion and their customs.
NEWS
By Walter Reich | June 5, 2007
After 2,000 years of indignity and ignominy, Herod the Great has finally gotten his revenge. During their revolt against Roman rule over Judea between 66 and 72 A.D., Jews who remembered King Herod as a Roman puppet smashed his sarcophagus, which had been interred with royal pomp about 70 years before. Christians have identified him as a baby killer who forced Jesus' family to flee Bethlehem. And Herod's habit of having his rivals and relatives killed has hardly burnished his image. True, he built monumental projects - not only Masada and Caesarea but also the grand expansion of the second Jewish temple in Jerusalem, the best-known remnant of which is the Western Wall.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | October 29, 1990
JERUSALEM -- Israel's Cabinet yesterday unanimously endorsed the findings of a special commission investigating the clash between police and Palestinians on the Temple Mount, even as Israeli commentators lambasted the the commission's report as inadequate.Cabinet members authorized the minister of police, Ronnie Milo, to carry out a reorganization of police but remained divided about whether any officers should be disciplined. Mr. Milo must obtain the Cabinet's approval for any disciplinary measure, even against those commanders the commission singled out for criticism.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 25, 1996
JERUSALEM -- When the Jerusalem city government unsealed a tunnel yesterday that chronicles 2,500 years of history, it enhanced a tourist attraction but also provoked the latest Arab-Israeli dispute over the future of the city.Workmen unsealed the exit of a 500-yard-long tunnel that runs along the edge of the Temple Mount -- where the Jewish Temple once stood and now the site of two of Islam's holiest shrines -- and a crowd of Palestinians responded by throwing stones and bottles at police.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | January 18, 1994
JERUSALEM -- What could be more Jewish than Israel's menorah?Something less pagan, perhaps, according to some Jewish scholars.The seven-branch candelabrum has been taking a beating lately for its use, and alleged misuse, in Israel.The menorah symbolized on Israel's shekel and printed on all official letterheads is a bit of a fraud, contends Professor Daniel Sperber, former dean of the faculty of Basic Jewish Studies at Bar-Ilan University in Tel Aviv."It's a historical mistake," he said.It seems the base of the menorah used in Israel is copied from an arch in Rome built two millenniums ago, which in turn was most likely copied from a temple in southern Turkey built for the worship of Zeus, the Greek god of the heavens.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2000
Live sheep, music, dancing, strolling shoppers and a roving tax collector were all part of a scene that met "tourists" visiting the first-century Holy Land at Oakland Mills Interfaith Center this week. An intergenerational vacation Bible school organized jointly by Lutheran Church of the Living Word and Columbia United Christian Church, "Passport to the Holy Land" re-created various cities - Nazareth, Jerusalem, Capernaum, Bethlehem and Bethany - on five consecutive nights from Sunday to yesterday.
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