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By Diane Winston | July 7, 1991
There's one power lunch that corporate attorney Ron Shapiro swears by -- an hour a month devoted to real power, the power that has created and destroyed civilizations, shaped and stymied human culture.Religious power."It's tough to make the transition," said Mr. Shapiro, describing the mental paces needed to make the walk from his capacious office to the corner boardroom of Shapiro and Olander where the monthly meeting of the Jewish Study Group of the Institute of Christian Jewish Studies is held.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
The Rev. William Baxter Jr., a retired Episcopal priest and former rector of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Owings Mills, died Jan. 13 of leukemia at his home in Ponte Vedra, Fla. He was 68. Mr. Baxter, the son of a federal worker and an educator, was born in Petersburg, Va., and raised in Bethesda. After graduating from Chevy Chase High School, he attended the University of Virginia and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park.
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TOPIC
By John Rivera | October 29, 2000
FOR THE PAST several weeks, Jewish and Christian religious circles across the nation and beyond have been abuzz about a document issued by a group in Baltimore. "Dabru Emet: A Jewish Statement on Christians and Christianity" -- which is commonly being referred to as "The Baltimore Document" -- has drawn praise, criticism and outright denunciation for its optimistic portrayal of the present and future of Christian-Jewish relations. The statement is especially controversial in the Jewish community because it states that Christian attitudes toward Judaism have improved so much in the past generation that Jews must reassess their conception and relationship with the Christian community.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 12, 2010
Frank Warner Kussy, a Holocaust survivor who won reparations for damages done to him and his business by both the Nazis and the communist government of East Germany, died of heart failure Oct. 1, less than two weeks short of his 100th birthday. "He was probably unique, in that he fought the German government double-time," said Kenneth Waltzer, director of Jewish Studies at James Madison College at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., who invited Mr. Kussy to speak to his class several times.
FEATURES
November 7, 1991
The first annual Baltimore-Washington Jewish Food and Life Expo will be held from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. There will be more than 80 international, national and local exhibitors, live music, entertainment, shops and kosher food inside and outside the Pikesville Armory. The expo will open at 11 a.m. and continue until 9 p.m. The Armory is located at 610 Reisterstown Road. The Etz Chaim Center for Jewish Studies is sponsoring the event. Admission is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children younger than 12; free for children younger than 2. For more information, call 764-1553.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1997
With the end of the millennium fast approaching, spiritual gurus, visionaries, religious fanatics and simple believers are looking to Holy Scripture for clues of what the future might bring.In Baltimore, congregations from white and black Christian churches and Jewish synagogues will meet six times over the next five months to explore what their religious traditions have to say about their visions of the future, including the often-disturbing biblical descriptions of the Apocalypse.In the End is the Beginning: Jewish & Christian Visions of the Future, a congregational study program of the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies, began last night.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2001
Since the terrorist attacks Sept. 11, interfaith exchanges have been on the rise, with many Baltimore-area Christians and Jews trying to increase their understanding of Islam as mosques have begun opening their doors to visitors. Those encounters continue this week as the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies holds a free session, "Islam and the Jewish/Christian Encounter," at 7:30 tonight at Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road. And on Saturday, the Islamic Society of Baltimore, which runs the area's largest mosque, Masjid Al-Rahmah in Woodlawn, plans to hold its second open house since Sept.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
A 25-year-old Boston philanthropist is teaming up with Baltimore's Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies to launch a $100,000 student essay contest designed to improve Christian-Jewish relations in the wake of Mel Gibson's The Passion of The Christ. The contest, Reaching Common Ground, will solicit religious-themed essays that illuminate the common origins and spiritual bonds of the two faiths. The $25,000 grand prize makes it one of the most lucrative student writing competitions in the nation.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
A new Jewish community high school that will embrace all branches of Judaism will open next year in northwestern Baltimore County, according to members of the school's board of trustees. A location has not been selected for the school, but board President Stewart Greenebaum said the logical place would be Owings Mills, the fastest-growing area with a large Jewish population. The board is seeking a permanent site on which to build and a temporary site for the first students when the school opens for the 2003-2004 academic year, he said.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
Hellmut Lehmann-Haupt, 88, an authority on the history of books and the father of New York Times book critic Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, died Wednesday in Columbia, Mo., where he was a professor of library science at the University of Missouri at Columbia from 1969 to 1974. The German-born Mr. Lehmann-Haupt worked for many years as curator of the rare book department at New York's Columbia University.Marshall Sklare, 70, a leading authority on the sociology of American Jewry, died March 1 at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Newton, Mass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
Daniel Clem Rigney, a former gas station owner turned missionary, died Sept. 28 of a massive heart attack at York Hospital in York, Pa. He was 73. Mr. Rigney was born in Baltimore and raised on Seven Mile Lane in Northwest Baltimore. After graduating from Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School in 1954, he worked as an auto mechanic and later owned a Reisterstown gas station. In 1965, Mr. Rigney decided to enter the ministry and graduated in 1968 from the Moody Bible Institute with a degree in Jewish studies.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 17, 2009
Marjorie Gordon, a former president of a paper box manufacturing business who was active in numerous civic organizations, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 5 at her north Baltimore home. She was 80. Born Marjorie Jane Chor in Baltimore, she was a 1946 graduate of Forest Park High School and attended the Women's College of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before earning a philosophy degree at Goucher College. She received a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2007
Dr. Harold Seymour Farfel, a pediatrician, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 82. A doctor who prided himself on making house calls, Dr. Farfel continued until his recent illness to attend pediatric rounds at Sinai Hospital, where he was a resident from 1950 to 1952. One of the patients at his practice in Catonsville, which he opened in 1955, was a boy who would grow up to be governor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., said Dr. Farfel's son, Dr. Mark Farfel of New York City.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
The Hebrew words echoed through the halls of the Catholic school. Inside a classroom decorated with a crucifix, a rabbi led the African-American students in song. Rabbi Gila Ruskin had lit the Sabbath candles, recited a blessing over her young charges and passed around a basket of animal crackers. Now, strumming the guitar, she sang: "Shabbat Shalom" - Sabbath Peace. Justine Jones double-clapped on the beat. Styinyard Blue stomped his feet. For juniors at St. Frances Academy, virtually all of them Baptist, Catholic or some other stripe of Christian, the weekly celebration of the Jewish Sabbath is a highlight of religious studies class.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 1, 2005
The eager way a glittery-eyed kid at a South London synagogue tries to lure our cricket-loving hero to a study group by saying they'll be talking about sex; the moment his German-Jewish mother blurts out her bond with her new Jamaican neighbors because she, too, is an immigrant. These casual revelations from Wondrous Oblivion, tomorrow's kick-off presentation of Baltimore's Jewish Film Festival, epitomize the off-hand humor and insight to be gained from intimate depictions of a subculture - one of this festival's specialties.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
A 25-year-old Boston philanthropist is teaming up with Baltimore's Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies to launch a $100,000 student essay contest designed to improve Christian-Jewish relations in the wake of Mel Gibson's The Passion of The Christ. The contest, Reaching Common Ground, will solicit religious-themed essays that illuminate the common origins and spiritual bonds of the two faiths. The $25,000 grand prize makes it one of the most lucrative student writing competitions in the nation.
NEWS
By John Rivera and Kate Shatzkin and John Rivera and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A tug of war is going on at Baltimore Hebrew University between the people who run it and the people who pay for it. The dispute: Should the Upper Park Heights school continue focusing on academic research or turn to more practical pursuits, such as training teachers and other professionals to serve the Jewish community? On one side is The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, the fund-raising umbrella that is BHU's biggest contributor. "It has been an academic institution, we wish it to remain an academic institution," said Shoshana S. Cardin, chairman of The Associated's task force on postsecondary Jewish education.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | August 17, 2009
Marjorie Gordon, a former president of a paper box manufacturing business who was active in numerous civic organizations, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 5 at her north Baltimore home. She was 80. Born Marjorie Jane Chor in Baltimore, she was a 1946 graduate of Forest Park High School and attended the Women's College of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before earning a philosophy degree at Goucher College. She received a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
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