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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
The heavy, old-fashioned, Germanic traveling bag may well have weighed more than the 7-year-old girl who carried it in 1940 when she fled from the Nazi regime in Vienna. Herta Griffel's passport, stamped with the Nazi eagle, described her as schlank, slim, slender, and called her staatlos, stateless. Her photo shows a lovely girl with luminous eyes and a halo of dark hair with thick, heavy braids. She's Herta Griffel Baitch now and the suitcase, just as her mother packed it, is displayed in the exhibit Lives Lost, Lives Found: Baltimore's German Jewish Refugees, 1933-1945, which just opened at the Jewish Museum of Maryland at 15 Lloyd St. She was brought to America, like many of the children rescued from the Nazis, by the German Jewish Children's Aid Committee of Baltimore.
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NEWS
July 16, 2014
Like so many others, I have been closely following the refugee crisis at the southern border. But instead of welcoming these poor children, who are desperate for help, many people refuse to recognize their humanity. For example, the Carroll County Board of Commissioners and Rep. Andy Harris protested the possibility that of some of the child refugees would be housed in Westminster ( "U.S. dismisses Carroll Co. as shelter site," July 13). I immediately thought of the Jewish refugees on the S.S. St. Louis who were turned away from the United States, as many of them died in concentration camps.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
The true story of the Old Bay Line steamer that glided out of Baltimore harbor nightly on a circuit to Norfolk and wound up playing a role in the founding of Israel is one of those maritime sagas so rich it became a best-selling novel and then a movie.Now the passenger boat with two identities and lives -- one as the President Warfield, the other as the Exodus 1947 -- is the subject of a new exhibit at the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, where the ship's original brass bell and steam whistle are on display.
NEWS
By Rafael Medoff | April 24, 2012
Franklin D. Rooseveltreceived 85 percent to 90 percent of the Jewish vote in 1932, 1936, and 1940. How was it, then, that in the run-up to the 1944 election, FDR's top Jewish supporters were worried that he might lose a significant portion of the Jewish vote? President Barack Obama's election strategists might want to examine this historical episode - especially in light of stinging comments made this month about the president's Israel policy by the editor of the largest American Jewish weekly newspaper.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2005
Slava Drakh moved to New York from Moscow but four years ago ended up in Baltimore, where he operates an eclectic restaurant that turns into a techno-thumping disco on weekends, a favorite of the area's thriving Russian community. "Everybody knows about Baltimore," said Drakh, 35, who operates the Art Gallery Cafe in Pikesville, which serves Russian, Italian and French cuisine as varied as borscht, veal marsala and duck salad. Many of Baltimore's Russian immigrants began life in the United States as cabdrivers, manicurists and grocery owners selling the familiar tastes of home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA CHATTIN | March 22, 2007
DOWN ON THE FARM Enjoy the fun side of farming life Saturday in Annapolis when the Maryland Department of Agriculture holds its annual open house. Shop the Maryland food and craft market, make slime in the state chemist's laboratory, practice hog-calling, milk a cow and more. It's a hands-on way to learn how food gets to the table and about the farmer's role in protecting the environment. .................... The open house will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, rain or shine, at the Maryland Department of Agriculture headquarters, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 2005
Sana Musasama's remarkable ceramic sculptures, on view at Coppin State University as part of Baltimore's Tour de Clay festival, showcase a mid-career artist at the top of her form. Maple Tree Series is a sprawling floor piece constructed of treelike forms planted amid grids of rough-hewn landscape and garden materials -- soil, tiles, colored stones, pine needles, etc. There's a kind of riotous spontaneity that belies the piece's serious conceptual intent. Musasama is an avid student of history, and this work celebrates a little-known 19th- century anti-slavery movement called the Maple Tree Abolitionists.
NEWS
May 17, 1997
I AM WRITING in response to your May 9 editorial, ''Switzerland's shame'' and the accompanying cartoon. I was appalled by the vitriolic and simplistic tenor of your comments, which do little to encourage honest introspection and inquiry.I grew up in Switzerland during the war years, exquisitely aware of the problems faced by my country.My mother was Jewish. She had met my father, a Swiss journalist, in 1933, while he reported on the infamous ''Kristalnacht,'' the night Nazi thugs destroyed Jewish businesses all over Germany.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
Like so many others, I have been closely following the refugee crisis at the southern border. But instead of welcoming these poor children, who are desperate for help, many people refuse to recognize their humanity. For example, the Carroll County Board of Commissioners and Rep. Andy Harris protested the possibility that of some of the child refugees would be housed in Westminster ( "U.S. dismisses Carroll Co. as shelter site," July 13). I immediately thought of the Jewish refugees on the S.S. St. Louis who were turned away from the United States, as many of them died in concentration camps.
NEWS
By Rafael Medoff | April 24, 2012
Franklin D. Rooseveltreceived 85 percent to 90 percent of the Jewish vote in 1932, 1936, and 1940. How was it, then, that in the run-up to the 1944 election, FDR's top Jewish supporters were worried that he might lose a significant portion of the Jewish vote? President Barack Obama's election strategists might want to examine this historical episode - especially in light of stinging comments made this month about the president's Israel policy by the editor of the largest American Jewish weekly newspaper.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Reporter | March 26, 2007
In the shade of Baltimore's World Trade Center, a prominent plaque overlooks the Inner Harbor. Near this spot, the Baltimore steamer President Warfield began her epic voyage into history. If none of that immediately strikes a chord, the inscription soon solves the mystery by revealing that the Warfield, a converted Chesapeake Bay steamship, made that journey under another name: Exodus 1947. The Jewish Museum of Maryland will commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Exodus' journey with presentations and discussions from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. April 25 at the Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 8100 Stevenson Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GENA CHATTIN | March 22, 2007
DOWN ON THE FARM Enjoy the fun side of farming life Saturday in Annapolis when the Maryland Department of Agriculture holds its annual open house. Shop the Maryland food and craft market, make slime in the state chemist's laboratory, practice hog-calling, milk a cow and more. It's a hands-on way to learn how food gets to the table and about the farmer's role in protecting the environment. .................... The open house will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, rain or shine, at the Maryland Department of Agriculture headquarters, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2005
Slava Drakh moved to New York from Moscow but four years ago ended up in Baltimore, where he operates an eclectic restaurant that turns into a techno-thumping disco on weekends, a favorite of the area's thriving Russian community. "Everybody knows about Baltimore," said Drakh, 35, who operates the Art Gallery Cafe in Pikesville, which serves Russian, Italian and French cuisine as varied as borscht, veal marsala and duck salad. Many of Baltimore's Russian immigrants began life in the United States as cabdrivers, manicurists and grocery owners selling the familiar tastes of home.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 29, 2005
Sana Musasama's remarkable ceramic sculptures, on view at Coppin State University as part of Baltimore's Tour de Clay festival, showcase a mid-career artist at the top of her form. Maple Tree Series is a sprawling floor piece constructed of treelike forms planted amid grids of rough-hewn landscape and garden materials -- soil, tiles, colored stones, pine needles, etc. There's a kind of riotous spontaneity that belies the piece's serious conceptual intent. Musasama is an avid student of history, and this work celebrates a little-known 19th- century anti-slavery movement called the Maple Tree Abolitionists.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2004
The heavy, old-fashioned, Germanic traveling bag may well have weighed more than the 7-year-old girl who carried it in 1940 when she fled from the Nazi regime in Vienna. Herta Griffel's passport, stamped with the Nazi eagle, described her as schlank, slim, slender, and called her staatlos, stateless. Her photo shows a lovely girl with luminous eyes and a halo of dark hair with thick, heavy braids. She's Herta Griffel Baitch now and the suitcase, just as her mother packed it, is displayed in the exhibit Lives Lost, Lives Found: Baltimore's German Jewish Refugees, 1933-1945, which just opened at the Jewish Museum of Maryland at 15 Lloyd St. She was brought to America, like many of the children rescued from the Nazis, by the German Jewish Children's Aid Committee of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
Gertrud A. Mendels, a survivor of the 1939 voyage of the steamship St. Louis whose cargo of German Jewish refugees was denied admittance at Cuban and American ports on the eve of World War II, died Wednesday of cancer at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Mount Washington resident was 86. Gertrud Scheuer, then 24 and a native of Framersheim, Germany, was among 930 Jewish refugees who fled Europe aboard the Hamburg-America Line's St. Louis in May 1939. As the ship steamed away from Hamburg, she stood on the stern and watched her homeland disappear over the horizon while dreaming of a reunion with her fiance, who had immigrated to Baltimore a year earlier.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | June 29, 1992
Like a schoolgirl, Izabella Konovalova sat hunched over an English primer and asked Markus Kalantyrskiy a Russian-accented question: "Is Tommy going to play baseball Saturday?""No, he isn't," Mr. Kalantyrskiy responded with the authority of one who carefully wrote out his lessons the night before. "He played baseball last Saturday. He doesn't like to play baseball every Saturday."Izabella Konovalova, 53, and Markus Kalantyrskiy, 55, aren't schoolchildren, don't know Tommy and have only the slightest acquaintance with America's national pastime.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 8, 1991
BERLIN -- A year after united Germany promised a "generous" treatment of Soviet Jews wanting to immigrate here, government rules and bureaucracy have significantly slowed the number of those entering.Government officials speak of necessary regulations to administer the former flood of asylum-seekers. But some Jewish leaders say Germany now is purposefully excluding Jews who want to come and making life difficult for those who manage to arrive."The government just feels trapped into accepting the Jews but really doesn't want them.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 10, 2001
"Haven," a four-hour CBS miniseries that tells the story of 982 European Jews allowed "safe haven" in the United States during World War II, is a welcome respite from all the silly, exploitative "reality" TV we've been seeing. This is reality, too - the kind of historic reality that can make a culture wiser, kinder and more moral when such stories are told on television, the principal storyteller of our time. "Haven" is loaded with fine acting by exceptional actors - Natasha Richardson, Anne Bancroft, Martin Landau, Colm Feore and Hal Holbrook.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 27, 1999
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co. has promised to make public in the next few months the results of its extensive probe into what exactly happened at its Cologne, Germany, factory during World War II. Based on examination of more than 77,000 pages of documents, Ford predicts that the public and courts -- if it comes to that -- will clear the company of any compli-city in the exploitation of thousands of forced laborers after the plant was seized by...
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