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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1999
JERUSALEM -- At the same time Israel is struggling to keep Jerusalem as the undivided, eternal capital of the Jewish state, many Jews are moving away from the holy city. During the past 20 years, the proportion of Jews in the city has been slowly but steadily shrinking, to the point where Jews now account for less than 70 percent of the population of 633,000, with Arabs making up most of the rest. Last year, the Jewish population grew by 1 percent, compared with a 3.5 percent increase for Arabs, according to a study by the Jerusalem Institute for Israel Affairs, a research organization.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
According to Jewish tradition, those who atone over the High Holidays for the sins of the past year will be granted peace, prosperity and life. As thousands of area Jews prepare to begin the solemn season Wednesday night amid high tensions in the Middle East, local rabbis say they've been praying that God might bestow similar good fortune on Israel. The topic of the Jewish homeland has long been an integral part of the religious observations for Rosh Hashana, which starts at sundown Wednesday, to Yom Kippur on Sept.
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
The Jewish population in the United States dropped from 5.5 million to 5.2 million over the past decade as birth rates remained low and intermarriage climbed slowly, according to a survey released yesterday by the United Jewish Communities. At the same time, the survey found that many Jews are widely engaged in the faith's cultural and religious life and that a large percentage participate in religious education programs. The survey, which organizers called the largest of its kind, was administered to about 4,500 Jewish respondents in 2000 and 2001.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
The article, "Jewish population hits new high in West Bank," (July 27) states that 350,000 Jewish settlers now occupy the West Bank, as well as nearly 300,000 in the occupied East Jerusalem. Israel is in violation of international law, the 4th Geneva Convention and the U.N. resolution 242, and it is condemned around the world for its brutal occupation and oppression of the Palestinians. In addition, Israel continues to maintain a strangulation blockade on the civilian population of Gaza, causing the Vatican to accuse Israel of turning Gaza into "a giant prison camp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 2002
A survey released yesterday estimated the Jewish population in the United States at 5.2 million, a decline of 300,000 from 10 years earlier. Other studies last month had reported figures of more than 6 million. That demographic estimates vary is no surprise. But the numbers underscore passionate arguments not just about who is a Jew, but about what is Jewishness and why it matters. The National Jewish Population Survey described an aging population whose women are having children relatively late.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 30, 2003
NEW YORK - A century after New York City's Jewish population thronged the airless streets of the Lower East Side, America's largest Jewish community is returning to its past. In recent decades, many of the descendants of the desperately poor immigrants who once made that Manhattan neighborhood the densest concentration of humanity in America have become one of the most successful segments of America's ethnic alloy, becoming ensconced in the ranks of the middle and upper classes. But a new survey of a community that has put an indelible stamp on this city's cuisine and language has found that being Jewish in New York is more likely these days to mean being strikingly different from Jews in the rest of the country - more likely to be Orthodox, more likely to be married to another Jew and, in a return to the patterns of the past, more likely to be a poor immigrant.
NEWS
By Katka Krosnar and Katka Krosnar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
BITOLA, Macedonia - It can be easy to miss, tucked away on the outskirts of this town, where 70 grand mosques pay more obvious testament to the Turkish past. But plans are under way to revive a key symbol of Macedonia's Jewish past - its 500-year-old Jewish cemetery. The burial site, together with a single memorial to Holocaust victims, is all that remains to pay homage to Bitola's vibrant prewar Jewish population. Bitola's 3,200 Jews, its five synagogues and its Jewish school disappeared as a result of the Holocaust.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 17, 2000
WARSAW, Poland - Leslaw Piszewski was 16 when he started "suspecting something" about his family: "There were too many secrets. I started asking questions and did not get answers." The urge to know the truth grew when he was 23 and his daughter was born. "I thought, I must tell my child who I am, who my parents are, who my grandparents are and where we come from," he explains. Pressed again for answers, Piszewski's father finally revealed a fact he had been hiding since World War II: He is Jewish.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
Baltimore's Jewish population continues to grow, but younger, non-Orthodox Jews are less likely than others to be actively engaged in Jewish organizations, a recent study of the Jewish community has found. The study, commissioned by The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, is described as "a snapshot of Jewish Baltimore," one the organization attempts to capture about every decade. Among the findings: •The Jewish population in the Baltimore area has grown 2 percent, to 93,400, since 1999, when the last survey was conducted.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2001
How can Howard County's rapidly growing Jewish population build a sense of Jewish community in the county? That was the question posed by speaker Larry Ziffer, vice president for community development at The Associated: the Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, at last night's annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Howard County in Oakland Mills Meeting Center. Howard County's Jewish population has grown 160 percent since 1985, from 6,100 to 16,000, according to a recent survey by The Associated.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
Baltimore's Jewish population continues to grow, but younger, non-Orthodox Jews are less likely than others to be actively engaged in Jewish organizations, a recent study of the Jewish community has found. The study, commissioned by The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, is described as "a snapshot of Jewish Baltimore," one the organization attempts to capture about every decade. Among the findings: •The Jewish population in the Baltimore area has grown 2 percent, to 93,400, since 1999, when the last survey was conducted.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | March 6, 2006
BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. -- Eddie and Ellen Goldberg moved from Baltimore 12 years ago. Aaron and Rosalie Friedmann left just a few months ago. But both couples have maintained their memberships at Beth El Congregation in Park Heights. And neither would have missed the chance yesterday to visit here with Rabbi Mark Loeb. "I want to welcome you to the southern extension of Beth El," said host Arnold Feldman, drawing laughter from the crowd of about 100 gathered in a banquet room. Then he said the Motzi, the Hebrew blessing over the bread, and these longtime members - some of them now retired to Florida, others just wintering here - began the joyful business of catching up with their synagogue and with one another.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 28, 2004
BIROBIDZHAN, Russia - It was trumpeted as a new Jerusalem, a Jewish homeland to be built by zealous Communists in the swamps and forests of Russia's Far East. And for a few years, the Jewish Autonomous Region - a tiny enclave created by the dictator Josef Stalin near Russia's eastern border with China - flourished as a haven for Jews uprooted from their villages in western parts of Russia, and for others from around the world. By the time the Soviet Union fell in 1991, the Yiddish-language theater, schools and culture planted here had long since withered, thanks to state-sponsored anti-Semitism.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
Baltimore's federation of Jewish charities will launch a campaign today seeking to raise $100 million over the next two years for a package of new building construction and renovations. The campaign is the most ambitious in the history of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore and marks its first attempt to raise money for only capital construction projects at such places as Baltimore Hebrew University and a social services complex along Park Heights Avenue. "This is a community that has always responded to our needs, and we anticipate a positive result," said Benjamin Greenwald, co-chairman of the campaign and chairman of The Associated's board.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
The Jewish population in the United States dropped from 5.5 million to 5.2 million over the past decade as birth rates remained low and intermarriage climbed slowly, according to a survey released yesterday by the United Jewish Communities. At the same time, the survey found that many Jews are widely engaged in the faith's cultural and religious life and that a large percentage participate in religious education programs. The survey, which organizers called the largest of its kind, was administered to about 4,500 Jewish respondents in 2000 and 2001.
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 30, 2003
NEW YORK - A century after New York City's Jewish population thronged the airless streets of the Lower East Side, America's largest Jewish community is returning to its past. In recent decades, many of the descendants of the desperately poor immigrants who once made that Manhattan neighborhood the densest concentration of humanity in America have become one of the most successful segments of America's ethnic alloy, becoming ensconced in the ranks of the middle and upper classes. But a new survey of a community that has put an indelible stamp on this city's cuisine and language has found that being Jewish in New York is more likely these days to mean being strikingly different from Jews in the rest of the country - more likely to be Orthodox, more likely to be married to another Jew and, in a return to the patterns of the past, more likely to be a poor immigrant.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 2001
How can Howard County's rapidly growing Jewish population build a sense of Jewish community in the county? That was the question posed by speaker Larry Ziffer, vice president for community development at The Associated: the Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, at last night's annual meeting of the Jewish Federation of Howard County in Oakland Mills Meeting Center. Howard County's Jewish population has grown 160 percent since 1985, from 6,100 to 16,000, according to a recent survey by The Associated.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1994
Members of Howard County's Jewish community will lace up their walking shoes Sunday in an event intended to help build unity among the county's estimated 8,500 Jews.The Jewish Federation of Howard County is sponsoring a one-mile walk called "Walk for Jewish Unity," starting at 4 p.m. at the Dorsey Hall Medical Center, 9501 Old Annapolis Road.The walk will continue on Old Annapolis Road to Columbia Road, head left on Woodland Road, and end at the Corporate Pavilion in the eastern portion of Centennial Park.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2002
Rabbi Seymour L. Essrog observes that, in a new demographic study that shows the United States' Jewish population shrinking, his family could be Exhibit A. Essrog, who leads a Reisterstown synagogue, has a daughter with three children. His other daughter married last year and, at age 35, has told her mother that she has time enough to have children. His son, 38, is single. The study, published by United Jewish Communities, an umbrella group of Jewish federations, found many families like the Conservative rabbi's.
TOPIC
October 13, 2002
The World A U.S. Marine was killed and another was wounded in an attack attributed to terrorists during a training exercise in Kuwait. Another Marine died in an apparent land mine explosion. A Chinese appeals court unexpectedly overturned the death sentences of five leaders of a Protestant evangelical Christian group, prosecuted under a law banning "evil cults." Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is unlikely to launch a chemical or biological attack against the United States unless he is provoked by the probability of an attack against his regime, intelligence sources told some members of the Senate.
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