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NEWS
April 3, 1991
A story in the March 27 issue of the Carroll County Sun, headlined "Holy Week, Easter celebrate life after death," contained the following statement:"Judas, one of his followers, betrayed Jesus that evening to the Jewish leaders who considered him a threat to their power. He was crucified the next day, which is celebrated as Good Friday."The Gospel texts state that the crucifixion itself was carried out by the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate. Biblical scholar Eugene J. Fisher writes, "The arrest of Jesus . . . was done covertly and at night precisely because of his popularity with the (Jewish)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
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NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
Richard L. Pearlstone, member of a philanthropic family that has left its imprint on the artistic, educational and religious life of Baltimore, was honored here recently for accepting chairmanship of the world's largest Jewish fund-raising effort.At the annual meeting of Baltimore's Jewish Federation at Center Stage June 16, Mr. Pearlstone received tributes for his record of service to Jewish interests in the United States and abroad. He was installed in New York on May 24 as national chairman of the United Jewish Appeal.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
Letter writer Janice Kelly claims that "those of us who are opposing Israeli apartheid are being called anti-Semites" ( "Criticism of Israel has merit," Feb. 16). Of course, this fallaciously assumes that there is such a thing as Israeli apartheid. Criticism of Israel is different from demonization. What leads people to believe that the boycotters are anti-Semites is that they maliciously characterize the situation in Israel as apartheid to justify a boycott. "Sentence first, verdict afterward," as the Queen of Hearts in "Alice in Wonderland" said.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | December 13, 1990
Maya Fishman, one year and two months out of the Soviet Union, listened with tears welling in her eyes while the yeshiva boys sang the ancient Hanukkah melody Maoz Tzur."
TOPIC
By Aron U. Raskas | October 8, 2000
ARIEL SHARON is a Jew. He shares with all Jews a rich heritage and cultural legacy known as the Temple Mount. This is, after all, the place where Abraham came to sacrifice his son to God. It is the site of the first and second Jewish Temples, where the Jewish people worshiped for hundreds of years. It remains the site of rich archaeological treasures from these Temples. It is Judaism's holiest place, and the focal point of every practicing Jew's prayers. Ten days ago, former defense minister Ariel Sharon had the good fortune to be able to do that which Jews dispersed for centuries in the diaspora could only hope, dream and pray for: On the eve of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year - the liturgy of which is replete with recollections of Abraham's selfless act on the Temple Mount and with prayers for a restoration of the divine presence to this site - Sharon dared to peacefully tread upon this hallowed Jewish ground.
NEWS
By Mikhail S. Gorbachev | May 4, 1997
AS RUSSIA struggles along its road to economic reform, we see that Jewish citizens, happily for Russia, occupy places of prominence and influence in our society and government.Yet we also hear from some quarters that they are again becoming the target of an archaic resentment.This must not be so.Anti-Semitism reared its vicious head in the mid-1980s despite the fact that, as president of the Soviet Union, and with the support of our people, we were able to open up the gates of liberty. We made it possible for people of all ethnic and religious backgrounds to have freedom - including the choice of many Soviet Jews to emigrate.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2002
JERUSALEM - Touching off a divisive national debate, the government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has endorsed a proposed law that would allow Jews to bar Arab citizens of Israel from living in or buying homes in many Israeli communities. The attempt to legalize "Jews-only" towns was swiftly criticized by numerous Israeli politicians and human rights groups, who said it is a discriminatory and racist proposal. Supporters praised the law for protecting what they called the essence of Zionism.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
For all those who believe The Sun's position on Palestinian statehood has merit, the following is offered for consideration ("Pressure on Israel to negotiate," Nov. 30). The Palestinian statehood that they are seeking now, they could have had in 1948 with an internationalized Jerusalem if not for the Arab world's belligerence in and out of the United Nations to this very day. The territory they lost to the Israelis was a direct result of the many attacks and provocations the Arab world initiated and against which the Israelis defended themselves successfully.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 9, 2004
SO I WAS PEDALING along on my bicycle, towing a little kiddie trailer that contained my daughter, Sophie, and her friend Sofia. I like to tow Sophie when she has a friend with her, because they quickly forget that I'm up there pedaling, so I can listen in on their conversations and find out what is on the minds of 4-year-old children. Usually it's something like this: First Child: You're a tree head! (Wild giggling) Second Child: No, you're a tree head! (Wild giggling) First Child: You're a pinecone head!
NEWS
February 4, 2014
Commentator Kenneth Lasson argues that universities should not boycott or divest from Israel, nor "inhibit Israeli scholars and scientists from obtaining grants or publishing learned articles" - all in the name of academic freedom ( "Academic extremism threatens democratic values," Jan 29). He claims the reasoning behind the boycott is flawed because "Israel has long been the most diverse, inclusive and tolerant of any Middle Eastern country," and further suggests that the boycott and divestment movement have their origins in an unsavory attempt to "draw a distinction between anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
NEWS
December 4, 2012
For all those who believe The Sun's position on Palestinian statehood has merit, the following is offered for consideration ("Pressure on Israel to negotiate," Nov. 30). The Palestinian statehood that they are seeking now, they could have had in 1948 with an internationalized Jerusalem if not for the Arab world's belligerence in and out of the United Nations to this very day. The territory they lost to the Israelis was a direct result of the many attacks and provocations the Arab world initiated and against which the Israelis defended themselves successfully.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
Two major advertisers in the Baltimore Jewish Times told a bankruptcy court Wednesday that they might not continue to buy space in the weekly newspaper if its ownership changes. Judge James Schneider weighed their testimony in bankruptcy proceedings against Baltimore-based Alter Communications, which publishes the nearly 100-year-old Jewish Times as well as other magazines. Alter Communications CEO Andrew Alter Buerger, who is editor and publisher of the Jewish Times, has said he would not participate in the joint ownership plan proposed by its former printer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Local Jewish leaders voted Wednesday to open a community center in Owings Mills on Saturdays, drawing expressions of both hope and sadness from across Baltimore's diverse Jewish community. The issue has highlighted a deep divide between the Orthodox and the rest of the Jewish community, and after the vote by the board of directors of the Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Greater Baltimore, leaders on both sides said they would work to improve communications. After weeks of debate, the Associated board voted 97 to 33 to allow the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore to open its Owings Mills location on Saturdays - the Jewish sabbath - beginning June 6. "The decision will give the JCC more of an opportunity to serve Jewish people in the Owings Mills area who ... do not automatically affiliate with Jewish organizations," said JCC President Louis "Buddy" Sapolsky.
NEWS
By Judea Pearl | March 22, 2009
In January, four longtime Israel bashers were invited to the University of California, Los Angeles, to analyze the human rights conditions in Gaza, and used the stage to attack the legitimacy of Zionism and its vision of a two-state solution for Israel and the Palestinians. They criminalized Israel's existence, distorted its motives and maligned its character, its birth, even its conception. At one point, the excited audience reportedly chanted "Zionism is Nazism" and worse. Jewish leaders condemned this hate-fest as a dangerous invitation to anti-Semitic hysteria.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | July 16, 1991
The history of Jewish people in Annapolis is like all history -- people famous and ordinary, noble and notorious, saintly and sinful.The pantheon of Annapolis Jews includes Albert Abraham Michelson, a Naval Academy midshipman who returned to the academy as a physics professor and became the first person to measure the speed of light.But there also was Jacob Lumbrozo, the first Jew in the colony, an unsavory doctor who became infamous for his numerous adulterous affairs and questionable medical procedures.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Isaac Hametz doesn't identify as an Orthodox Jew, and neither do many of the Jewish people living in downtown. But the 30-year-old was enlisted by the leader of Lloyd Street's B'nai Israel congregation for a singularly Orthodox quest: Determine how to create a downtown eruv, a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes possible certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Rabbi Etan Mintz, who joined B'nai Israel in August 2012, said an eruv is critical to helping the 140-year-old congregation attract and retain families, and ultimately re-establish itself as the center of a thriving downtown Jewish community.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Poem carries whiff of anti-Semitism Despite Will Englund's attempt at cleverness, the "Merry Christmas" poem (editorial, Dec. 25), contained a reference that has been historically perceived as anti-Semitic. While lobbyist Jack Abramoff has yet to be judged, comparing him to Charles Dickens' character Fagin perpetuates stereotypes and anti-Semitism. Anti-Semitism, ingrained into Victorian English society, manifested itself in Dickens' depiction of Fagin, the head of the thieves in Oliver Twist.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
An electric permanent wave machine. A handmade Barbie doll dress that conforms to Orthodox Jewish standards of modesty. A 1900 wedding dress made and worn by Bertha Rose Manko, who worked at the Schoen Russell Millinery Shop on Charles Street. In the exhibition, Hello Gorgeous! Fashion, Beauty, and the Jewish-American Ideal, these objects and hundreds of others tell the story of how Jews in this country have both adapted to and defined standards of beauty. Opening today at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, Hello Gorgeous!
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