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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2004
Norman Lebrecht, an ever-provocative British writer, has made a lucrative career out of periodically predicting the death of classical music. One of his most recent pronouncements is that classical recordings will have expired totally by the end of 2004. As evidence, he lists notable artists who have been dropped by classical labels lately, an unpromising merger between the Sony and BMG labels, and assorted other dark-cloud seeders. It's always easy to agree with Lebrecht's doom-and-gloom spiels, since there really is a lot of bad news.
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NEWS
January 10, 2014
Sunday, Jan. 12 Concert The Jewish Federation of Howard County presents the Robyn Helzner Trio performing "From Beijing to Biloxi: A Concert of Jewish Music" at 3 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre, 5460 Trumpeter Road in Columbia. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door, free for children 5 and younger. Information: 410-730-4976, ext. 106 or jewishhowardcounty.org. Monday, Jan. 13 Classical music The Columbia Orchestra invites the public to its open rehearsal at 7:30 p.m. at The Gathering Place, 6120 Day Long Lane in Clarksville.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | December 28, 1992
Even if you've never heard of Klezmer music, you've probably heard it.That's because Klezmer, loosely defined as Jewish folk music, has influenced, and in turn been influenced by, virtually every style of music that Jewish people have had contact with over the last few hundred years.Layer upon layer of musical archaeology was visible yesterday afternoon as the Baltimore Klezmer Orchestra had a packed house dancing in the aisles of the Lloyd Street Synagogue, the 19th century structure that is now a part of the Jewish Historical Society.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 6, 2010
Cantor Sharon M. Wallach, who had been affiliated with Adat Chaim Congregation in several roles since its founding in 1985, died Friday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 52. Ms. Wallach, the daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, was born in Philadelphia and raised in Cheltenham, Pa. After graduating from Cheltenham High School in 1975, she earned a bachelor's degree in music, speech and hearing in 1979 from the University of Pittsburgh. The following year, she earned a master's degree in education for the hearing-impaired, also from Pitt.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2001
Judaism is a religion and an evolving civilization, and music has established a universal presence in both. From the cantorial repertoire crafted to convey the spiritual intensity of Jewish liturgy, to the "Klezmorim" of Eastern Europe, to grand Christian-like settings of psalms composed when Jews were allowed to enter Europe's cultural mainstream in the 19th century, to Israeli folk songs, music has been one of Judaism's strongest sources of cultural and...
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During the holiday season, Christmas music is everywhere, but it seems as if a good Hanukkah song is hard to find. That's how pianist Jon Simon felt about 16 years ago. "After hearing all these fun, interesting ways of taking familiar [Christmas] songs and re- interpreting them ... I went home and started noodling around the keyboard," he said. He decided that Jewish music -- including Hanukkah songs, music from other holidays and folk music -- could be revamped and revitalized, as well.
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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
Let's play "What's My Line?"Look at the cover of Kim Komrad's CD, "Voice of the Lioness" (Lioness Productions LP0530), and the first guess that comes to mind is probably not "member of the clergy."Komrad is, in fact, the cantor at Beth Israel Congregation, a Conservative synagogue in Owings Mills. That the cover art features her in a glamorous pose, wearing a spaghetti-strap gown, is no contradiction, she says. The photograph is meant to broaden people's minds as to what a cantor can be, as Komrad hopes her CD can broaden the public's conception of Jewish music.
NEWS
March 14, 1995
John Carrier Weaver, 79, a university administrator instrumental in the formation of the University of Wisconsin System with 27 campuses when he was its president from 1971 to 1977, died Friday at his home in Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif. He was president of the University of Missouri, with four campuses, from 1966 to 1970 and president of the University of Wisconsin, with a single campus in Madison, in 1971 before he oversaw its merger with the Wisconsin State University System.Herbert Fromm, 90, a composer and writer who fled Nazi Germany before World War II, died Friday of heart disease in Brookline, Mass.
FEATURES
May 13, 1991
"Those were the Days," the English-Yiddish musical revue coming to Center Stage on June 4 as part of a national tour, received two Tony Award nominations this week.The production, which recently completed a successful run at Broadway's Edison Theatre, also garnered a Drama Desk nomination from New York theater critics for Best Musical Revue.The show, conceived by Zalmen Mlotek and Moishe Rosenfeld, focuses on the Jewish music and theater experience from the shtetl (Old World Jewish community)
NEWS
February 16, 1996
Judith Kaplan Eisenstein, 86, who in 1922 became the first girl to undergo the Jewish rite of bat mitzvah, died Wednesday of a heart attack in Bethesda.A musicologist, teacher and author of books about Jewish music, she was the daughter of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan, founder of the Jewish Reconstructionist movement.He presided over her bat mitzvah service in New York. Jewish boys for centuries had observed the bar mitzvah as a rite ofpassage into adulthood when they reach age 13.Eva Hart, 91, who was 7 when she was rescued from the sinking Titanic, died Wednesday in London.
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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During the holiday season, Christmas music is everywhere, but it seems as if a good Hanukkah song is hard to find. That's how pianist Jon Simon felt about 16 years ago. "After hearing all these fun, interesting ways of taking familiar [Christmas] songs and re- interpreting them ... I went home and started noodling around the keyboard," he said. He decided that Jewish music -- including Hanukkah songs, music from other holidays and folk music -- could be revamped and revitalized, as well.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2004
Norman Lebrecht, an ever-provocative British writer, has made a lucrative career out of periodically predicting the death of classical music. One of his most recent pronouncements is that classical recordings will have expired totally by the end of 2004. As evidence, he lists notable artists who have been dropped by classical labels lately, an unpromising merger between the Sony and BMG labels, and assorted other dark-cloud seeders. It's always easy to agree with Lebrecht's doom-and-gloom spiels, since there really is a lot of bad news.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2003
Vocolot is a women's a cappella ensemble specializing in Jewish music. Directed by Linda Hirschhorn, a songwriter and Cantor at Temple Beth Sholom in San Leandro, Calif., the ensemble draws from a variety of musical styles including liturgical, folk, jazz and a host of international influences ranging from the Arab world to South America. The group's name, by the way, is a play on the English word "vocal" and the Hebrew word kolot, which means song. "They're like a Jewish [version of]
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By Brad Kava and Brad Kava,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 9, 2002
The members of New York's Hip Hop Hoodios are probably the only Spanish-speaking rock-rappers with a hot album out who celebrated a Passover Seder. The unlikely, mostly kosher quartet sounds like something from an Adam Sandler song, as odd as tortillas and lox or gefilte fish with salsa. They rock as hard as the Beastie Boys and are more in-your-face funny than Tenacious D. And yet, although they firmly plant tongues in cheeks on songs such as "Havana Nagilah," they know underneath that the Beasties, another unlikely group of Jewish (now Buddhist)
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 6, 2001
Anti-Semitism never came up against a more determined foe than Dmitri Shostakovich. This Gentile composer had an instinctive and lifelong aversion to that mindset, so prevalent in his Russian homeland. He also had an uncanny appreciation for Jewish music, its ambiguities and "ability to project radically different emotions simultaneously," to quote Shostakovich scholar Laurel E. Fay. So when he came across a collection of Jewish folk poems published in Russian translation in 1948, Shostakovich could set them to music that was thoroughly his own, yet extraordinarily idiomatic.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1995
From Jewish puppets and brisket to Yiddish folk music, Jewish culture will be showcased today at Howard County's first Jewish Festival inside and outside the Galleria at Howard Community College in Columbia.Strains of centuries-old shtetl (village) life and modern Israel will permeate the college parking lot with an array of ethnic foods, art, entertainment and children's activities.The event is sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Howard County, the umbrella group for Jewish organizations in the county, and the HCC Jewish Students Union.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | May 28, 1993
Summer may be just around the corner, but a vacation is the furthest thing from the arts community's mind. Much is on tap for Anne Arundel County audiences during the coming months.No Broadway musical is more redolent of summer than Meredith Wilson's tuneful, extraordinarily clever hit "The Music Man." This classic story of the prim, proper Iowa librarian, Marian Paroo, who falls for Harold Hill, the fast-talking, filmflam music director is chock full of barbershop quartets, Fourth of July picnics and those lumps in the throat we get when that big brass band marches by.The Annapolis Summer Garden Theater begins its 28th season "theater under the stars at the City Dock" this weekend.
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