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By Mike Giuliano | June 3, 2011
The thematic links established between blacks and Jews are as clear as the glass used in the mosaics displayed in the Jewish Museum of Maryland exhibit "Loring Cornish: In Each Other's Shoes. " His intention is to demonstrate how two historically oppressed groups have more in common than they sometimes realize. A black artist who lives in Baltimore, Cornish was working on civil rights-related artwork several years ago when he met a Jewish couple. As he explains in an exhibit statement: "Everything changed.
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By Natalie Sherman | September 11, 2014
The University System of Maryland Board of Regents voted Thursday to sell the vacant and deteriorated former Hebrew Orphan Asylum in West Baltimore to the Coppin Heights Community Development Corp. for redevelopment as a community health center, according to a university spokesman. The land is currently owned by Coppin State University, which acquired it as part of a 7.3-acre, $680,000 purchase from the Lutheran Home and Hospital Foundation Inc. in 2003. The chancellor recommended that the board allow Coppin State University to move forward with sale of the property.
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By Richard Gorelick | May 16, 2012
On Sunday, in conjunction with its ongoing exhbition Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity , the Jewish Museum will present " Knish History 101: Life and Times of the Knish" a lecture by Laura Siilver titled  Silver will tell everyone all about the knish, that lovable, humble stuffed hunk of dough. Guests are invited to show up with their knish memories, recipes and recollections and listen to knish tales from the Midwest, the Lower East SIde and the Polish town of Knyszyn, where Silver traces her roots.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
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by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gefilte fish, the beloved Jewish preparation of slow simmered ground fish, takes the front burner on Sunday at GefilteFest, a full day of cooking crafts, music and storytelling for the whole family at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Organized in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identify," GefilteFest will feature a visit from the folks of Gefilteria , a Brooklyn-N.Y.-based "purveyor of boutique gefilte Old Wold Jewish foods" and will culminate, at 2 p.m., in a "Gefilte Fish Throwdown," pitting Gefilteria's Liz Alpern against Wit & Wisdom 's Dave Whaley and Pikesville's own Susan Silbiger, for the chance to be crowned Gefilte Maven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
As Judy Greiner strolled through San Francisco's Chinatown in the mid-20th century, she couldn't help noticing that the bespectacled Jewish bubbes and tattooed Asian gamblers were eyeing one another with wary respect. You wouldn't want to meet a representative of either group in a dark alley - at least, not if they were brandishing a mah-jongg set. Chances were that you'd stagger away hours later with an empty wallet and no clear recollection of how that sad state of affairs had come to pass.
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Jacques Kelly | February 15, 2013
As a child in the mid-1950s, I asked my mother why we didn't live in a modern house built of new, salmon-toned brick like my schoolmates. We lived in a traditional city neighborhood, in a three-story 1915 rowhouse. We had only a small backyard that lacked a barbecue area or swing set. A new exhibition staged by the Jewish Museum of Maryland and presented at downtown's Enoch Pratt Free Library examines this same point, and many others. "Jews on the Move: Baltimore and the Suburban Exodus, 1945-1968" demonstrates how thousands of families called up Davidson movers and took off for ranchers and split levels in greater Northwest Baltimore.
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By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 2012
The best consumer advice for those attending the current exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is: Plan on going out to eat immediately after the show. "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identity" is brimming with delicious information about brisket, challah, bagels, matzoh balls, potato latkes, gefilte fish and other foods guaranteed to spark an appetite. Through text panels, photographs and actual kitchen objects, the exhibit is a multi-course exploration of how Jewish identity is established at the dinner table as much as in a synagogue service.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 26, 2001
The Jewish Museum of Maryland has been awarded a $112,500 grant - its third in as many years - by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. It was among 178 museum grants, including two in Maryland, announced yesterday by the independent federal agency. More than 800 had applied for the competitive grants, whose recipients are free to use the money in any way they choose for improving overall service. The other Maryland grant, also $112,500, was awarded to Historic St. Mary's City in southern Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
A couple years ago, African-American artist Loring Cornish was focusing his creativity on works that addressed the civil rights movement. When a Jewish couple, Ellen and Paul Saval, bought some other pieces of his, Cornish went to their home to hang the art. By the time he was finished, "something came over me," he said. "I don't what it was. But I realized then that I had to include the struggles of the Jewish people in my work about the African-American experience. I went home, flipped over the 8-by-8(-foot)
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Jacques Kelly | February 15, 2013
As a child in the mid-1950s, I asked my mother why we didn't live in a modern house built of new, salmon-toned brick like my schoolmates. We lived in a traditional city neighborhood, in a three-story 1915 rowhouse. We had only a small backyard that lacked a barbecue area or swing set. A new exhibition staged by the Jewish Museum of Maryland and presented at downtown's Enoch Pratt Free Library examines this same point, and many others. "Jews on the Move: Baltimore and the Suburban Exodus, 1945-1968" demonstrates how thousands of families called up Davidson movers and took off for ranchers and split levels in greater Northwest Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Gefilte fish, the beloved Jewish preparation of slow simmered ground fish, takes the front burner on Sunday at GefilteFest, a full day of cooking crafts, music and storytelling for the whole family at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Organized in conjunction with the ongoing exhibition "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identify," GefilteFest will feature a visit from the folks of Gefilteria , a Brooklyn-N.Y.-based "purveyor of boutique gefilte Old Wold Jewish foods" and will culminate, at 2 p.m., in a "Gefilte Fish Throwdown," pitting Gefilteria's Liz Alpern against Wit & Wisdom 's Dave Whaley and Pikesville's own Susan Silbiger, for the chance to be crowned Gefilte Maven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | May 16, 2012
On Sunday, in conjunction with its ongoing exhbition Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity , the Jewish Museum will present " Knish History 101: Life and Times of the Knish" a lecture by Laura Siilver titled  Silver will tell everyone all about the knish, that lovable, humble stuffed hunk of dough. Guests are invited to show up with their knish memories, recipes and recollections and listen to knish tales from the Midwest, the Lower East SIde and the Polish town of Knyszyn, where Silver traces her roots.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | January 10, 2012
The best consumer advice for those attending the current exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is: Plan on going out to eat immediately after the show. "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identity" is brimming with delicious information about brisket, challah, bagels, matzoh balls, potato latkes, gefilte fish and other foods guaranteed to spark an appetite. Through text panels, photographs and actual kitchen objects, the exhibit is a multi-course exploration of how Jewish identity is established at the dinner table as much as in a synagogue service.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | December 8, 2011
The best consumer advice for those attending the current exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland is: Plan on going out to eat immediately after the show. "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture and American Jewish Identity" is brimming with delicious information about brisket, challah, bagels, matzoh balls, potato latkes, gefilte fish and more guaranteed to spark an appetite. Through text panels, photographs and actual kitchen objects, the exhibit is a multi-course exploration of how Jewish identity is established at the dinner table as much as in a synagogue service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
When the staff and contributors at the Jewish Museum of Maryland were putting together the new exhibit "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity," they knew better than to try and tell people what is Jewish food and what is not. If a matzo ball is pretty clearly Jewish food, does a low-fat version with chives still count? Is falafel Jewish? Is hummus? Can sushi be Jewish if it's served at Jewish weddings? Where does lo mein fit in? According to curator Karen Falk, questions like those, and the way they are linked to larger conversations about religious, ethical and cultural values, are at the heart of the exhibit, which opens Oct. 23 and runs through September 2012.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 1996
WARSAW, Poland -- In the belief that Poles should understand more about the long history of Jews in their country than the abbreviated account of the Holocaust taught in schools, an effort is under way to build a Jewish museum here.But both at home and abroad there is ambivalence.American Jewish organizations, who are expected to be among the major donors, say they will not consider financing the museum until the government pays restitution for Jewish property confiscated by the Nazis and then nationalized by the Communists after World War II.The museum's backers, who include curators at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, also say they must overcome a view among some Jews that after the killing of 3 million Polish Jews, it is not worth artificially reviving a dead culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011
With a few shards of glass, tile and other discarded bits, Loring Cornish can re-create his world into a shimmering mosaic wonderland.  After growing up in Reservoir Hill and studying at Morgan State University, he has established himself as an artist, though not one who's conventionally trained. His distinct style and passion for mosaics is always visible - his own two rowhouses in Reservoir Hill are covered with multi-colored tiles and glass shards.  Cornish's work has appeared in shows and museums across the country, including the American Visionary Art Museum and the Jewish Museum of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
In the shadow of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia, John Wilkes Booth will tell anyone who'll listen just why that tyrant had to be assassinated. Supporting himself on a wooden crutch, a decidedly agitated Booth, his voice rising to match the fierceness in his eyes, rants about the war and how it ended. "My genteel South, gone," he says, seemingly on the verge of a sob. He goes on to relate the events of that night at Ford's Theatre, the leap from the presidential box and the escape through Maryland that eventually led him to a barn in Virginia, surrounded by Union troops.
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