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By Ruth Ellen Gruber | July 21, 2000
WROCLAW, Poland -- When Americans Ellen Friedland and Curt Fissel first went to Poland a few years ago, they expected to learn only about Jewish death -- the annihilation of 3 million Polish Jews during the Holocaust; the death camps; the devastated shtetls, cemeteries and synagogues. They were amazed to find small Jewish communities that had begun emerging after the fall of communism. Ms. Friedland and Mr. Fissel became immersed in chronicling -- and championing -- this still fragile rebirth and produced a documentary film about it in 1997.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014
The murder of three Israeli youths made the back pages of The Sun several weeks ago ( "A dangerous turning point in Israel," July 7). The unjustifiable beating of the Palestinian teen made the front page on two separate occasions. Is Jewish life less precious? As a 70-year reader of the Sun, I am curious about the newspaper's position. Paul Alpert, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
I. William Schimmel, an attorney who was active for decades in Baltimore's Jewish community, died Thursday of natural causes at Roland Park Place. He was 103. Born in New York City in 1896, Mr. Schimmel moved to Baltimore with his family when he was 3 years old. He graduated from City College in 1913 and from the University of Maryland law school in 1916. He practiced commercial law in Baltimore for more than 60 years. He was a member of the American, Maryland and Baltimore bar associations.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 5, 2013
As Beit Tikvah Congregation's new rabbi, Larry Pinsker settled into his new office, a visitor couldn't help noticing stuffed animals and action figures on a bookshelf, including ones of Moses, Sigmund Freud and Plastic Man, a 1950s precursor of Elastic Man. The longtime rabbi, a comic book aficionado and collector of superhero figurines, has left his former post as associate rabbi of Shaarey Zedek in Winnipeg, Canada, largest conservative Jewish...
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 19, 1993
VIENNA, Austria -- Reminders of the beauty and sophistication of old Vienna's Jewish community, obliterated by Nazi rule, have gone on display in a new museum that has come to stand for strength and renewal even as it symbolizes terror and loss.The new Jewish Museum is the spiritual heir to Europe's oldest collection of Judaica, established here in 1897 but destroyed by Nazis in 1938. Its debut includes a stroll through a lost Jewish Vienna.An enlarged antique map of the city center was stamped onto the floor of an exhibition hall that includes an illustrated marriage contract, ceremonial items crafted of silver and a bowl of calling cards from a Jewish elite that was welcomed in Austria's best salons.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 24, 2002
Is there such a thing as Jewish photography? Is there such a thing as black or African-American photography? In the normal course of things, such questions might seem presumptuous or even offensive, smacking as they do of some inherent, clearly identifiable genetic or racial marker. Isn't photography, after all, the most "objective" of the visual arts, the least susceptible to intentional - or unintentional - bias? Not quite, as it turns out. But two current shows offer an opportunity to test the hypothesis: Ken Royster's beautiful exhibition of black worshipers at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, and Jack Eisenberg's edgy photographs of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at the Jewish Museum of Maryland.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | November 16, 1992
As a scholarly work with popular appeal, "The Jewish People in America" is the ideal project for the Johns Hopkins University Press."We just really think it's the kind of book that's hard to come by, but we really want to publish," says Douglas Armato, marketing manager for the press.The five-volume series -- sponsored by the American Jewish Historical Society (AJHS) on the occasion of its centennial -- chronicles Jewish life in the United States from 1654 through the present. Released Nov. 1, the set is in its second printing.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 20, 1998
"Facing the New World," which opens at the Maryland Historical Society today, amounts to too much of a good thing and not enough of another good thing. An exhibit based on early American Jewish life, it marries a national component that goes on at great length with a local component that only whets the appetite.The conflict between assimilation into the larger community and retention of ethnic identity continues to be a concern of the American Jewish population. Its present-day manifestations were the subject of last year's "Too Jewish?"
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
From foreign lands and America's teeming cities they came, these Jewish peddlers and traders, setting up shop in Maryland's small towns as the 19th century waned. One Jewish merchant traveled from Russia by way of Alaska, ultimately starting a business in Frostburg, because that is where his horse died sometime around 1890. Another Jewish family opened a shop in Havre de Grace, after a Coney Island fortuneteller told them to leave New York City and cross two rivers. They chose the Hudson and the Susquehanna.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2007
The crowds and the noise, the live chickens at Yankelove's Poultry, the bagels at Wartzman's and the cream cheese at Smelkinson's, the sidewalk fruit stands and pickle barrels ... they've all vanished from East Lombard Street, once the heart of Jewish East Baltimore. All that remains is a trio of delicatessens - Lenny's, Weiss' and Attman's - and, just off Lombard on Lloyd Street, B'nai Israel, the sole surviving active synagogue, and the Jewish Museum of Maryland. But all the memories, and a happy reunion of former East Lombard Street regulars, converged on the museum yesterday.
NEWS
November 3, 2006
`To Life' -- Columbia Art Center Galleries is presenting To Life: Celebrating Jewish Life Cycle Events, a juried exhibition sponsored by the art center and the Columbia Jewish Congregation of Columbia, through Nov. 19. The show includes more than 30 works by American and British artists representing birth, brit milah, marriage and other milestones in Jewish life. A reception is planned from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. tomorrow. 410-730- 0075.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | March 20, 2006
Ideally, Rabbi Benjamin Insel would have finished his Shabbos shopping by now. But it's mid-afternoon on a Friday, just a couple of hours before sundown, and the middle-school English teacher once again finds himself at Seven Mile Market, gathering up the chicken, the kugel and the gefilte fish for the five guests he'll be hosting for dinner on the weekend. "I realize I should do this on Thursday," Insel says cheerfully, as his 4-year-old son Michael clutches a bag of marshmallows. "But with work, and looking after my son, and correcting papers, it's always Friday."
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
The Hebrew words echoed through the halls of the Catholic school. Inside a classroom decorated with a crucifix, a rabbi led the African-American students in song. Rabbi Gila Ruskin had lit the Sabbath candles, recited a blessing over her young charges and passed around a basket of animal crackers. Now, strumming the guitar, she sang: "Shabbat Shalom" - Sabbath Peace. Justine Jones double-clapped on the beat. Styinyard Blue stomped his feet. For juniors at St. Frances Academy, virtually all of them Baptist, Catholic or some other stripe of Christian, the weekly celebration of the Jewish Sabbath is a highlight of religious studies class.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2000
BALTIMORE'S CHARLES Village community could soon be the setting for a $5 million center for Jewish students at the Johns Hopkins University. The city's Design Advisory Panel has approved preliminary plans for the Smokler Center for Jewish Life at the Johns Hopkins University, a four-level building planned at 3109 N. Charles St., east of the Homewood campus. The building is a project of Hillel of Greater Baltimore, an organization that provides social, religious and educational services to Jewish college students.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BALTIMORE will soon be the home of a $2.25 million history and education center that has been touted as the nation's"largest and most advanced facility for the study, understanding and appreciation of regional American Jewish history."The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has set May 5 as the groundbreaking for the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a 12,000-square-foot expansion of its three-building campus at 15 Lloyd St. near Lombard Street. When complete in late 1997, the brick-and-stone building will contain a 2,000-square-foot exhibition gallery, expanded library, visitor orientation center, museum shop, entrance court, staff offices and more than 4,000 square feet of new storage and processing space for the growing collection of documents and photographs.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 2, 2005
CHARLESTON, S.C. - The sign in the window of Max's Clothing Store is a symbol of a dying tradition in the South. The clothing shop, opened by the owner's Jewish immigrant father 70 years ago, is going out of business. It wasn't supposed to happen so soon. Maurice Krawcheck, 68, had planned to pass the company to his sons, just as his father, Max, had done. But one of his boys became a lawyer and the other, a clothing manufacturer. There was no one left to mind the store. Family-owned retail stores, many started by Jews who settled in the South as peddlers, have helped fuel the economies of Southern towns for 300 years.
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