Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJewish Leaders
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Leaders

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1995
Several national Jewish leaders said yesterday that a clarifying letter from Cardinal William H. Keeler has defused a controversy over a recent ecumenical statement on Christian rights in Jerusalem.A draft of the letter was being circulated among leaders of Jewry in New York, Chicago, Washington and Baltimore. The draft was prepared by the cardinal and his advisers after a hastily called meeting with the Jewish leaders Monday at his Baltimore residence.The American Jewish Committee had attacked the March 6 statement, which sought a greater Christian role in determining the future of Jerusalem, as "seriously flawed and incomplete."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas met Monday with the teenager who allegedly was beaten by Israeli police last week, and Jewish leaders in Baltimore condemned the alleged abduction and killing of his cousin by several Israelis. In Israel, meanwhile, Hamas stepped up rocket fire at southern towns, and the government called up reserve troops in anticipation of a possible escalation of hostilities with the Islamist group that dominates the Gaza Strip. Relatives of 15-year-old Tariq Abu Khdeir, a Baltimore native who is visiting family in Israel with his parents and two younger sisters, say he was watching a protest leading up to the funeral of his cousin in East Jerusalem last Thursday when he was detained by Israeli police.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael James and Frank P. L. Somerville and Michael James and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writers | March 14, 1995
Cardinal William H. Keeler sought yesterday to mollify national Jewish leaders angered over a recent request by him and Protestant and Orthodox leaders for a greater Christian role in the future of Jerusalem.The request, issued March 6, sparked a meeting at the cardinal's residence in Baltimore yesterday. In part, the Christian clergymen had asked that the Clinton administration "press Israel to stop seizing land and constructing settlements in the Jerusalem area."Since the statement was issued -- signed by Cardinal Keeler as president of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops -- it has been assailed by several Jewish groups, who accused the Christian leaders of being one-sided.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Maryland political and Jewish leaders reflected Saturday on the death of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and said they found hope in the vision for peace in the Middle East that he outlined shortly before suffering a stroke in 2006. Sen. Ben Cardin extended his sympathies to Sharon's relatives, who have cared for the leader since he was incapacitated by a stroke. "For eight years, they have stood vigil as a great general fought the greatest battle of his life," Cardin said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | February 26, 1994
Yesterday's massacre of Muslims in Hebron was "a loathsome, criminal act of murder and there's absolutely no excuse for it," said the president of Baltimore's principal Zionist organization.Like most local Jewish leaders who commented on the tragedy, Joel R. Wohl, president of the Zionist Organization of America in Baltimore, said he hoped the peace negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians would stay on track and be intensified.Muslim reaction was similar.Dr. Bashar Pharoan, the president of the Islamic Society of Maryland, said, "I hope [the massacre]
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States, strapped for foreign-aid money, is turning to European allies to help Israel defray what it claims are billions of dollars in added costs as a result of the Persian Gulf war, a group of Jewish leaders was told this week in a meeting with Secretary of State James A. Baker III.Israel, which gets $3 billion a year in aid from the United States, has been left out of most of the financial compensation to states economically damaged...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - A Virginia congressman was engulfed in criticism yesterday for recent comments suggesting that Jewish leaders were behind the drive toward war with Iraq and had the power to stop it if they wished. Rep. James P. Moran sparked the furor with his remarks at an antiwar forum March 3 in his Northern Virginia district. "If it were not for the strong support of the Jewish community for this war with Iraq, we would not be doing this," said Moran. "The leaders of the Jewish community are influential enough that they could change the direction of where this is going, and I think they should."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- John H. Sununu asserted yesterday he is "not blaming anybody but myself" for the controversy surrounding his travel practices and issued denials to Jewish leaders that he considered pro-Israel groups part of a vendetta against him.The White House chief of staff issued a one-paragraph statement yesterday, saying for the first time that he held only himself responsible for recent missteps that have brought presidential rebukes and sharp restrictions...
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
The dramatic defeat of Israel's hard-line Likud government this week does not alter the fundamental reasons for U.S. Jewish support of Israel.But it may make the job easier, some Jewish leaders in Baltimore acknowledge.The positions of Labor Party leader Yitzhak Rabin, the likely new prime minister, are more compatible with what Washington wants: He is expected to quicken the Middle East peace process, curb Jewish settlement in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza, and work toward Palestinian autonomy.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
By accepting an invitation to address American Jewish leaders, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf enhanced his international status as a moderate Islamic leader on whom the United States can rely. His appearance Sept. 17 at the American Jewish Congress in New York was a twofer: It allowed for a very public overture toward Israel with an audience influential in American politics, and it provided a chance to curry favor with the Bush administration on its peace initiative. Mr. Musharraf's decision to break with Islamabad's decades-long anti-Israel policy also has ramifications for Pakistan's historic nemesis, India, which has a working relationship with the Jewish state.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2010
After the alleged assault of a black teenager by a member of the Shomrim neighborhood patrol group, black and Jewish community leaders met at a closed meeting to facilitate relations between the groups. Four of the leaders spoke briefly to the media after emerging from the close to 90 minute meeting, saying they had not decided whether to call for the Shomrim to disband, but that they plan to continue dialogue between the communities. Wednesday's gathering prompted "much discussion, sometimes heated discussion," Arthur C. Abramson, executive director of the Baltimore Jewish Council.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | July 13, 2007
To Latino parishioners, Cardinal William H. Keeler is a leader who embraced diversity and made the effort to learn their language. To Jewish leaders, he is admired for his integrity, honesty and tireless efforts at building interfaith dialogue. And to Baltimore's half a million Catholics, Keeler will be remembered for providing guidance, comfort and acceptance while leading such ambitious projects as restoring the Basilica of the Assumption and finding a new home for an expanded Our Daily Bread soup kitchen.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
Discussing his position on embryonic stem cell research with Baltimore Jewish leaders yesterday, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele said he is "concerned about the destruction of human life" and made a comparison between the controversial science and experiments done on Jews during the Holocaust. "You of all folks know what happens when people decide they want to experiment on human beings, when they want to take your life and use it as a tool," said Steele, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, to a crowd of about 40 at a Baltimore Jewish Council board meeting.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Alex Elias had heard the words of the prophets - passages from the Books of Amos and Isaiah on war, peace and idol worship. Now, stepping to the front of the classroom, the curly-haired 12-year-old was ready to give it a try himself. "You should oppose violence," Alex intoned before the students and parents who filled the child-sized chairs and desks. "When it appears to do good, the good it does is only temporary. The evil it does is permanent." Several parents nodded approvingly. On a drizzly evening at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, another lesson was being affirmed through the generations.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 22, 2005
Men wearing yarmulkes and women wearing head scarves listened intently as Maqbool Patel talked about the way Muslims greet each other. "Asalaam alaikum, peace and blessings be upon you," the co-founder of the Islamic Society of Baltimore told the gathering at Beth Israel Congregation in Owings Mills. "It's very similar to what is said in Hebrew: shalom." At a dinner honoring both the Muslim observance of Ramadan and the Jewish feast of Sukkot, two dozen leaders of the local Muslim and Jewish communities shared their faiths Thursday.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
By accepting an invitation to address American Jewish leaders, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf enhanced his international status as a moderate Islamic leader on whom the United States can rely. His appearance Sept. 17 at the American Jewish Congress in New York was a twofer: It allowed for a very public overture toward Israel with an audience influential in American politics, and it provided a chance to curry favor with the Bush administration on its peace initiative. Mr. Musharraf's decision to break with Islamabad's decades-long anti-Israel policy also has ramifications for Pakistan's historic nemesis, India, which has a working relationship with the Jewish state.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | December 20, 1994
Praising Cardinal William H. Keeler for his role in improving Jewish-Roman Catholic relations, representatives of Baltimore Jewry presented a silver menorah to him yesterday "as one who has spent his life spreading light to others."Rabbi Joel H. Zaiman, president of the Baltimore Jewish Council, spoke of Jewish leaders' anticipation that Archbishop Keeler would be raised to the rank of cardinal. "We knew it was only a question of time," Rabbi Zaiman said, "and better sooner than later."Noting "the remarkable changes in relations" between Jews and Catholics in recent years, Rabbi Zaiman said of the newly elevated cardinal, "Our friend is now one of the key Catholic leaders in this area of church life -- so we rejoice."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2003
HOWARD DEAN'S comments about Israel are delaying a much-anticipated endorsement from Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, the Baltimore Democrat and Congressional Black Caucus chairman. When Cummings appeared with the former Vermont governor during a Baltimore fund-raiser for the presidential candidate last month, a formal endorsement seemed only days away. For Dean, the backing from the CBC head would be a coup, coming soon after Dean endured negative publicity for a comment that the Democratic Party should aggressively pursue the votes of white, male Southerners with Confederate flags on their pickup trucks.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Columbia's four interfaith centers embody the planned community's vision of bringing together diverse groups, providing a place to worship in a tolerant environment. More than 5,000 congregants - including Buddhists, Muslims, Jews and Christians - attend services at the centers weekly. A congregation of Messianic Jews - who believe that Jesus is the Messiah - is building a fifth interfaith center in Columbia's last village of River Hill. And that has ignited a debate over freedom of religion in the town that was developed in 1967 as a home for people of all races and backgrounds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.