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By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
Yehuda Fishkind's new matzo bakery is run more like a little synagogue than a business where dough is rolled and baked for the traditional Jewish Passover flat bread.Instead of using machines to mix and knead the dough, Mr. Fishkind's employees stand side by side like worshipers, carefully hand-rolling each matzo under the strict rules of Jewish law.They say a simple prayer as they roll each batch of matzos. And a rabbi inspects every matzo as it comes out of the wood-burning oven.It has been almost 40 years since matzos were baked in Baltimore, according to the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas met Monday with the teenager who allegedly was beaten by Israeli police last week, and Jewish leaders in Baltimore condemned the alleged abduction and killing of his cousin by several Israelis. In Israel, meanwhile, Hamas stepped up rocket fire at southern towns, and the government called up reserve troops in anticipation of a possible escalation of hostilities with the Islamist group that dominates the Gaza Strip. Relatives of 15-year-old Tariq Abu Khdeir, a Baltimore native who is visiting family in Israel with his parents and two younger sisters, say he was watching a protest leading up to the funeral of his cousin in East Jerusalem last Thursday when he was detained by Israeli police.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | September 25, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel's national electric company is facing a religious quandary: How can the Jewish state's power supplier generate electricity on the Sabbath without violating the laws of the Jewish day of rest and prayer? To find an answer, the multibillion-dollar company has turned to the shabby offices of Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Halperin, a 72-year-old spiritual adviser with a Father Time beard, who is widely recognized as the final word on what is possible and what is not under Orthodox Jewish law. Jewish law provides a guide for the actions of observant Jews from morning until night.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Religious decree would be required for Orthodox Jewish women After a spirited debate about the separation of church and state yesterday, the Maryland Senate moved a step closer to passing a bill to require that Orthodox Jewish women seeking a divorce also be granted a get, the religious decree that ends the marriage. Some men hold the get over their wives in exchange for custody agreements or visitation schedules. Without it, a woman is not allowed to remarry within the faith. The legislative proposal would require those filing for divorce or not contesting one to file an affidavit stating that they would not mount a religious opposition to remarriage.
NEWS
By Herman N. Neuberger | April 17, 1997
ISRAEL'S ORTHODOX Jews are portrayed by the American press as religious fanatics who impose their will on an unsupportive non-religious populace. The image of the average Israeli as being crushed beneath the burden of the powerful religious Knesset members is misleading and indeed is pure partisan propaganda.According to a 1993 survey by the respected Guttman Institute for Applied Social Research, aside from the approximately 25 percent of Israel's population that practices Orthodoxy, a full 54 percent of the country's Jews define themselves as ''traditional,'' professing adherence to the defining beliefs of what here in the U.S. is called Orthodox Judaism.
NEWS
By Steven Wilf | August 11, 2000
HARTFORD, Conn. --When John F. Kennedy was nominated for president 40 years ago, the question was whether he would submit to the authority of the pope or of the Constitution. Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut would likely raise the same kind of issues as the Democratic vice presidential candidate. Where does the loyalty of an Orthodox Jew lie? Will he feel obligated to Jewish law above American law? This is a case, however, where two laws are better than one. Having two laws means making compromises, figuring out the way competing demands can fit and having a faith in your ability to negotiate the differences between the two. Mr. Lieberman has clearly excelled at this task.
NEWS
June 1, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Haaretz in Tel Aviv that was published Wednesday.PRIME Minister-elect Ehud Barak's promise to change the face of the nation cannot be realized without making far-reaching changes in the educational system.Public concern is largely focused on the expansion of the ultra-Orthodox educational systems, which are raising -- with government funds -- a generation that turns its back on the fundamental values of Israeli society.The networks educate their students entirely by Jewish law, promoting theocracy and nurturing disdain for the rule of law in the state that nourishes them.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1995
ALON SHEVUT, Israeli-Occupied West Bank -- Rabbi Yisrael Rozen wants his chicken shaken.Not long -- maybe a minute of shaking before its ritual bath. The land will be glad for it, he says.Rabbi Rozen and Israeli environment officials say a vigorous shaking would help rid a kosher chicken of some of its excess salt.This is important, they say, because the salt used in the process of making meat kosher -- religiously pure -- is taking a toll on the land.In short, kosher food is hazardous to the earth.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay .. and Liz F. Kay ..,Sun reporter | September 19, 2006
Cynthia Ohana hasn't lived with her husband for three years, and she secured a civil divorce more than a year ago. But under Jewish law, the Park Heights woman remains trapped - an agunah, or "anchored down" in Hebrew - because Ephraim Ohana refuses to grant her a divorce agreement recognized by Orthodox Jewish law. Without what's known as a get, Cynthia Ohana isn't permitted to date or remarry in the Orthodox community - even though the civil court...
NEWS
December 6, 2002
Pancake breakfast to be held tomorrow at St. Michael's The Men's Club of St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church in Poplar Springs will hold its annual pancake breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. tomorrow in the church hall, 1125 St. Michael's Road. Pancakes, sausage, home fries, scrambled eggs, juice and coffee will be served. Free rides with Santa Claus in his sleigh will be offered on the church parking lot, weather permitting. The cost is $4.50 for adults; $2.50 for children to age 10. A photographer will be available to take pictures.
NEWS
December 8, 2006
Right to marry is a key to happiness Marylanders of all races should be reminded that it was not long ago that interracial marriage was subject to discrimination ("Gay marriage case in Md. court," Dec. 5). In 1967, in Loving vs. Virginia, the Supreme Court defined the freedom to marry as an individual right that cannot be infringed upon by the majority. Chief Justice Earl Warren summarized the court's decision, "Under the Constitution, the freedom to marry, or not to marry, a person of another race, resides with the individual and cannot be infringed upon by the state."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 4, 2006
Leaders of Conservative Judaism will consider interpretations of Jewish law tomorrow that could render homosexual acts acceptable. If approved, the decision would open the door for the ordination of gay men and lesbians and recognition of same-sex relationships within America's second-largest branch of Judaism.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | September 25, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel's national electric company is facing a religious quandary: How can the Jewish state's power supplier generate electricity on the Sabbath without violating the laws of the Jewish day of rest and prayer? To find an answer, the multibillion-dollar company has turned to the shabby offices of Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Halperin, a 72-year-old spiritual adviser with a Father Time beard, who is widely recognized as the final word on what is possible and what is not under Orthodox Jewish law. Jewish law provides a guide for the actions of observant Jews from morning until night.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay .. and Liz F. Kay ..,Sun reporter | September 19, 2006
Cynthia Ohana hasn't lived with her husband for three years, and she secured a civil divorce more than a year ago. But under Jewish law, the Park Heights woman remains trapped - an agunah, or "anchored down" in Hebrew - because Ephraim Ohana refuses to grant her a divorce agreement recognized by Orthodox Jewish law. Without what's known as a get, Cynthia Ohana isn't permitted to date or remarry in the Orthodox community - even though the civil court...
NEWS
February 4, 2005
Jewish view of sex to be Tuesday focus as series continues Rabbi Susan Grossman of Beth Shalom Congregation in Columbia is presenting a four-part lecture series on the Jewish view of abortion, homosexuality, premarital sex, domestic violence and related topics at 7:45 p.m. Tuesdays. "When Sex is Good and When It's Not: Jewish Responses to Adultery, Sexual Violence and Incest," will be the topic Tuesday. "Be Fruitful and Multiply: The Jewish Ethics of Family Planning, Birth Control, Infertility Treatments and Abortion," will be discussed Feb. 15, and "What Does it Mean to be Created in God's Image: Homosexuality and Judaism," is the topic for Feb. 22. Rabbi Grossman is chairwoman of the subcommittee on family, human sexuality and gender for the Conservative movement's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards, as well as spiritual leader of Beth Shalom Congregation.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
Given the digital age, Hanukkah will likely begin tonight with gift-giving that includes cutting-edge technology never dreamed of by Moses and Jewish sages who codified the Torah and the rest of Jewish law. Such technological advances have spawned a specialty in the art of interpreting "Halakha," the Hebrew word for the laws that govern daily life of observant Jews. Today's rabbis are being peppered with queries about using the Internet, properly disposing of CD-ROMs containing Scripture, observing e-mail etiquette and the ethics of copying software.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
When the black hat of Orthodoxy first settles upon the head of an adolescent Jew, the boy beneath the brim begins giving way to manhood."The mothers say they can't see their little boy anymore," says a rabbi who supplies hats to Baltimore's Orthodox community. "They want the smallest brim because they don't want the child to disappear beneath the hat."Though a symbol of strict adherence to Jewish law, the wearing of a black hat is custom and not law. In the United States, it was almost exclusively the domain of rabbis and yeshiva students until about 40 years ago.And it is no small statement of fashion, even among a people taught to value modesty and humility.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Religious decree would be required for Orthodox Jewish women After a spirited debate about the separation of church and state yesterday, the Maryland Senate moved a step closer to passing a bill to require that Orthodox Jewish women seeking a divorce also be granted a get, the religious decree that ends the marriage. Some men hold the get over their wives in exchange for custody agreements or visitation schedules. Without it, a woman is not allowed to remarry within the faith. The legislative proposal would require those filing for divorce or not contesting one to file an affidavit stating that they would not mount a religious opposition to remarriage.
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