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By GLENN MCNATT | September 6, 2007
She was born Judith Sylvia Cohen in 1939, but the world knows her as the pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago, whose installation The Dinner Party (1974-79), which celebrated important women throughout history, became a leader of the women's movement. Now a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores how Chicago's secular Jewish upbringing shaped her artistic vision and her compassionate identification with the plight of oppressed people the world over. Judy Chicago: Jewish Identity presents artworks from throughout her career that challenge injustice and express the artist's long-standing aspiration for universal tolerance, understanding and peace.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
As a young critic, I liked the ABC sitcom "Welcome Back, Kotter. " But I had a special spot in my heart for Juan Epstein, the character played with such energy and adventure by Robert Hegyes. I didn't really understand my affection for Hegyes and Epstein, though, until 2000 when I wrote "The Jews of Prime Time," a study of Jewish identity on network TV. (It's really a study in self-censorship by the Jewish founders and their lieutenants.) News of the actor's death at age 60 Thursday from a heart attack sent me back to the book, and this passage is the best appreciation and context I can offer for the TV career of Hegyes.
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By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 6, 2007
The Yiddish Policemen's Union By Michael Chabon HarperCollins / 411 pages / $26.95 Let's begin with an uncomfortable question: What has Michael Chabon been up to for the past seven years? Certainly he's been writing; in 2002, he published Summerland, a lengthy baseball fantasy for young readers, and two years later, his novella The Final Solution imagined Sherlock Holmes as an old man. He has also edited a couple of anthologies and created a series of comic books featuring the Escapist, the superhero he invented for his novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
When the staff and contributors at the Jewish Museum of Maryland were putting together the new exhibit "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity," they knew better than to try and tell people what is Jewish food and what is not. If a matzo ball is pretty clearly Jewish food, does a low-fat version with chives still count? Is falafel Jewish? Is hummus? Can sushi be Jewish if it's served at Jewish weddings? Where does lo mein fit in? According to curator Karen Falk, questions like those, and the way they are linked to larger conversations about religious, ethical and cultural values, are at the heart of the exhibit, which opens Oct. 23 and runs through September 2012.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
For centuries, Jewish families seeking suitable mates for their daughters and sons have employed the services of a matchmaker, an honored figure in the community who acts as a counselor, a diplomat and a reliable source of neighborhood news. Nancy Granat, a former corporate manager with a degree in counseling, is a matchmaker for the new millennium. "You have personal trainers. You have financial consultants," said Granat, 59, a grandmother whose tools are a computer database and her intuition.
TOPIC
By John Rivera | June 4, 2000
IS IT POSSIBLE to imagine an Israel without the Law of Return, the cherished right of every Jew to return to the biblical homeland? Is it possible to conceive of the Israeli flag absent the Star of David? Or that Israel might drop its evocative national anthem, "Hatikva," which proclaims: "In the Jewish heart a Jewish spirit still sings, and the eyes look east toward Zion" ? Is it possible to imagine an Israel without a Jewish identity? Such a scenario is not only possible but likely, if Israel continues on its present course, says Yoram Hazony, author of "The Jewish State: The Struggle for Israel's Soul."
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2004
As Jewish people around the world celebrate the miracle of Hanukkah, many living in the United States likely will reflect upon the challenge of maintaining their religious identity, said a local rabbi. In the Hanukkah tale, "the Jewish people were fighting for the right to be Jewish," Rabbi Mark J. Panoff recently told about 20 high school sophomores in the confirmation class at Temple Isaiah in Fulton. Confirmation class involves students learning how Judaism plays a role in their lives.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 20, 1998
"Facing the New World," which opens at the Maryland Historical Society today, amounts to too much of a good thing and not enough of another good thing. An exhibit based on early American Jewish life, it marries a national component that goes on at great length with a local component that only whets the appetite.The conflict between assimilation into the larger community and retention of ethnic identity continues to be a concern of the American Jewish population. Its present-day manifestations were the subject of last year's "Too Jewish?"
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
A scholar says Jews should worry about the vitality of their own faith before worrying about the next generation.Referring to future generations, Rabbi David Hartman, who gave the closing address yesterday to the 60th General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations at the Baltimore Convention Center, said, "you can't control their future. You're not going to control the people they're going to meet. Instead of worrying about their continuity, worry about your joy in Judaism."Hartman is the founder of an institute in Jerusalem dedicated to drawing upon the heritage of Judaism in the confrontation between Jewish identity and modern society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
When the staff and contributors at the Jewish Museum of Maryland were putting together the new exhibit "Chosen Food: Cuisine, Culture, and American Jewish Identity," they knew better than to try and tell people what is Jewish food and what is not. If a matzo ball is pretty clearly Jewish food, does a low-fat version with chives still count? Is falafel Jewish? Is hummus? Can sushi be Jewish if it's served at Jewish weddings? Where does lo mein fit in? According to curator Karen Falk, questions like those, and the way they are linked to larger conversations about religious, ethical and cultural values, are at the heart of the exhibit, which opens Oct. 23 and runs through September 2012.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | January 13, 2008
The Jewish Americans Three Centuries of Jewish Voices in America By Beth S. Wenger Doubleday / 388 pages / $40 The product of a working-class family from the Bronx, Bess Myerson declined to change to a less Jewish-sounding name for the Miss America contest of 1945. "Now, Besseleh," her father repeated, "don't forget who you are out there." When she became the first Jew to wear the crown, Myerson gazed at the crowd at the Warner Theater "and saw all the Jewish people hugging each other, congratulating each other, as though they had won."
NEWS
September 9, 2007
TELEVISION ALIVE DAY MEMORIES: HOME FROM IRAQ / / 10:30 tonight. HBO ....................... James Gandolfini quickly finds meaningful life after The Sopranos as executive producer and interviewer for this stirring documentary on a new generation of veterans trying to adjust after being wounded in Iraq. The term "alive day" refers to the day that the soldiers and Marines survived life-threatening injuries in the war. Gandolfini helps 10 men and women recount that day and the directions their lives have taken since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT | September 6, 2007
She was born Judith Sylvia Cohen in 1939, but the world knows her as the pioneering feminist artist Judy Chicago, whose installation The Dinner Party (1974-79), which celebrated important women throughout history, became a leader of the women's movement. Now a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores how Chicago's secular Jewish upbringing shaped her artistic vision and her compassionate identification with the plight of oppressed people the world over. Judy Chicago: Jewish Identity presents artworks from throughout her career that challenge injustice and express the artist's long-standing aspiration for universal tolerance, understanding and peace.
NEWS
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | May 6, 2007
The Yiddish Policemen's Union By Michael Chabon HarperCollins / 411 pages / $26.95 Let's begin with an uncomfortable question: What has Michael Chabon been up to for the past seven years? Certainly he's been writing; in 2002, he published Summerland, a lengthy baseball fantasy for young readers, and two years later, his novella The Final Solution imagined Sherlock Holmes as an old man. He has also edited a couple of anthologies and created a series of comic books featuring the Escapist, the superhero he invented for his novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2006
THEATRICAL CONCERT HALF-DOZEN DIVAS Although the show's title is 3 Mo' Divas!, there are six chanteuses performing -- three at a time -- at Washington's Arena Stage. Created, directed and choreographed by Marion J. Caffey (who served the same functions with Three Mo' Tenors), this theatrical concert is so demanding vocally, Caffey hired two casts. Gretha Boston, Jamet Pittman and N'Kenge will alternate with Andrea Jones-Sojola, Nina Negri and Vivian Reed performing four centuries of song, from Johann Sebastian Bach to the Supremes.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2004
As Jewish people around the world celebrate the miracle of Hanukkah, many living in the United States likely will reflect upon the challenge of maintaining their religious identity, said a local rabbi. In the Hanukkah tale, "the Jewish people were fighting for the right to be Jewish," Rabbi Mark J. Panoff recently told about 20 high school sophomores in the confirmation class at Temple Isaiah in Fulton. Confirmation class involves students learning how Judaism plays a role in their lives.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2000
BIROBIDZHAN, Russia -- In 1945, Mikhail Kul returned home from the war against Hitler to find that the Holocaust had nearly emptied his Ukrainian village. The survivors told of German atrocities, of the Nazi soldiers who drove a crowd of Jewish villagers into a river and machine-gunned them. His cousin had died holding her baby. Then a group of recruiters showed up in 1947. Far away, Jews were building a new state, and settlers were invited to contribute to the rebirth of their people.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 31, 2001
JERUSALEM - With his black coat, luxuriant white beard and spectacled, tired eyes, Rabbi Aharon Feldman looks the very picture of an aging, distinguished Torah scholar. But Baltimoreans who expect the 69-year-old new dean of Ner Israel Rabbinical College to be quietly absorbed in the Bible and the wisdom of the sages might be in for a surprise. This is a man who has lived for 40 years in Israel, where voicing blunt opinions is a national pastime. And Feldman, who will join the noted yeshiva next month, is passionate on the subject of preserving Jewish identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | April 6, 2003
Editors note: The following is an excerpt from The Jews of Prime Time, a new book by Sun television critic David Zurawik. The book, from Brandeis University Press / University Press of New England ($29.95, 275 pages), is the result of an 11-year study he undertook on the treatment of Jewish identity on network television shows. His research began with a story he wrote for The Sun in 1991. A riddle: What is "too Jewish," yet not Jewish enough? An answer: the strange history of Jewish characters on prime-time network television, starting in 1949 with The Goldbergs, a remarkable CBS sitcom about a multigeneration Jewish family living in a six-room apartment in the Bronx.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | October 18, 2002
CHICAGO -- It would be foolish to suggest that all criticism of Israel is motivated by anti-Semitism, but it would be irresponsible to believe that none of it is. Consider the continued insistence of New Jersey poet Amiri Baraka that "4,000 Israeli workers at the Twin Towers" were told to stay home the day that the World Trade Center was attacked. Mr. Baraka carries on the ancient tradition of blaming Jews for all types of disasters, from plagues to poisonings, in this case repeating a canard that was first issued by a Lebanese radio station.
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