Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJewish Home
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Home

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
There's no uncertainty in the Lindenbaums' living room about what holiday they are celebrating this year. The husband and wife once made merry in winter with a Christmas tree for Amanda, who was raised Catholic, and a Hanukkah menorah for Heath, who grew up Jewish. But now menorah stickers cling to the windows of their Pikesville home, which is strung indoors and out with blue and white lights in preparation for the holiday beginning tonight. Amanda and her husband decided last year to maintain a Jewish home for their two children, though they will still visit her parents for breakfast on Dec. 25. "We have a festive home, but it's not a Christmas tree home," she said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | February 11, 2013
As President Barack Obama begins his second term, he faces a series of Middle East challenges far more daunting than when he began his presidency in 2009. These problems include: •what to do about the Arab-Israeli conflict, with peace talks between Israel and the Palestinian Authority still frozen; •whether to intervene in the civil war in Syria, which has now claimed more than 60,000 lives, with the opposition to the Assad regime becoming more Islamist; •how to manage relations with an increasingly Islamist regime in Egypt in such a way that the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty is not endangered; •how to handle an Iraq on the verge of multiple civil wars, one between the Arabs and the Kurds and the other between Sunnis and Shiites; •how to deal with al-Qaida activity in both Yemen and North Africa (Mali and Algeria)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | February 11, 2013
As President Barack Obama begins his second term, he faces a series of Middle East challenges far more daunting than when he began his presidency in 2009. These problems include: •what to do about the Arab-Israeli conflict, with peace talks between Israel and the Palestinian Authority still frozen; •whether to intervene in the civil war in Syria, which has now claimed more than 60,000 lives, with the opposition to the Assad regime becoming more Islamist; •how to manage relations with an increasingly Islamist regime in Egypt in such a way that the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty is not endangered; •how to handle an Iraq on the verge of multiple civil wars, one between the Arabs and the Kurds and the other between Sunnis and Shiites; •how to deal with al-Qaida activity in both Yemen and North Africa (Mali and Algeria)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
A song in Hebrew rang out from a crowd gathered in a Harford County park at sundown Wednesday. Throughout the joyful salute to Hanukkah, Peter Silton held a burning torch. After the singers intoned, "Amen," he lit the first candle of a towering metal menorah to honor the first night of the Jewish celebration. He needed a stepladder to light the shamas — the candle that is usually lit first then used to light the others — officially beginning the first Hanukkah observance in the county to be held on public property.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2001
How does one commemorate the joy - or challenge - associated with moving into a new home? For many, a home blessing brings a sense of the sacred into their living space. Home blessings are practiced by Jews, Catholics and Lutherans, among others. All these traditions hold in common a belief that God has a central place in the life of the home and the family. Each faith uses a home blessings ceremony to bind members more closely to that faith. "For a long time in our society, faith has been compartmentalized," says the Rev. William Gies of Trinity Lutheran Church.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
A song in Hebrew rang out from a crowd gathered in a Harford County park at sundown Wednesday. Throughout the joyful salute to Hanukkah, Peter Silton held a burning torch. After the singers intoned, "Amen," he lit the first candle of a towering metal menorah to honor the first night of the Jewish celebration. He needed a stepladder to light the shamas — the candle that is usually lit first then used to light the others — officially beginning the first Hanukkah observance in the county to be held on public property.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
CHAI's role in revitalizing Park HeightsAntero Pietila's Jan. 28 column, "The Necessities of a Jewish Home," chronicles the influx of Orthodox Jewish families in the Park Heights Avenue corridor. The many factors for this phenomenon -- from affordability of homes in the area to the establishment of the eruv -- were stated in the column.However, things do not happen in a vacuum. A major factor has been the work of Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc. (CHAI), the housing development arm of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | January 28, 1995
"Coming soon,'' the sign says, ''17 luxury homes starting at $279,000."And this is Baltimore City?The real-estate market elsewhere in the city may be flat, but Bruce Scherr foresees no difficulty selling the houses he is about build near Bonnie View Country Club. The reason: the upscale homes are within walking distance of a dynamic Orthodox synagogue.''Fruppie houses,'' quips a neighbor, playing with the words ''yuppie'' and frum (observant).Major demographic shifts are taking place in Baltimore's Jewish community.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
There's no uncertainty in the Lindenbaums' living room about what holiday they are celebrating this year. The husband and wife once made merry in winter with a Christmas tree for Amanda, who was raised Catholic, and a Hanukkah menorah for Heath, who grew up Jewish. But now menorah stickers cling to the windows of their Pikesville home, which is strung indoors and out with blue and white lights in preparation for the holiday beginning tonight. Amanda and her husband decided last year to maintain a Jewish home for their two children, though they will still visit her parents for breakfast on Dec. 25. "We have a festive home, but it's not a Christmas tree home," she said.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2006
In a state Senate building hallway rests an exhibit about people who were not digested. They are Jews who built religious and ethnic Jewish communities in Maryland's small towns. They balanced fitting in with standing out, making a living with making a Jewish home life - in some three dozen towns. "When I came to the Eastern Shore, I realized that the whale wasn't a big fish, it was a small town, and that Jonah wasn't the great prophet Jonah, but he was any Jew who found himself in a small town.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2003
After unrolling parchment the size of his palm, Rabbi Hillel Baron used a magnifying glass to read over the ornate Hebrew lettering, checking for fading, smudging, misshapen letters and missing words. He quickly discovered that the three lines that form a crown atop one letter were barely attached. Baron filled in the lines with a traditional ink mixture of charcoal, vinegar, nut extract and tree sap. "The lines are smudged together," Baron said. "It's basically kosher, but needs correcting.
NEWS
By Diane Reynolds and Diane Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2001
How does one commemorate the joy - or challenge - associated with moving into a new home? For many, a home blessing brings a sense of the sacred into their living space. Home blessings are practiced by Jews, Catholics and Lutherans, among others. All these traditions hold in common a belief that God has a central place in the life of the home and the family. Each faith uses a home blessings ceremony to bind members more closely to that faith. "For a long time in our society, faith has been compartmentalized," says the Rev. William Gies of Trinity Lutheran Church.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 9, 1998
"Latkes, like bagels, have gone mainstream," said Michael Batterberry, editor-in-chief of Food Arts Magazine, as he recently dipped his fork into - what else? - a crispy, plump, potato pancake.Although latkes may be ubiquitous, served at many restaurants year-round throughout the country, they are served once a year in many Jewish American homes as a symbolic food on Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Sunday.The holiday celebrates the victory of the Jewish Maccabee brothers over Antiochus of Assyria in 164 B.C. When they returned to the ransacked temple, the Maccabees found a tiny bit of sacred olive oil that miraculously lasted not one, but eight days; the miracle is commemorated by eight days of lighting candles.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2003
After unrolling parchment the size of his palm, Rabbi Hillel Baron used a magnifying glass to read over the ornate Hebrew lettering, checking for fading, smudging, misshapen letters and missing words. He quickly discovered that the three lines that form a crown atop one letter were barely attached. Baron filled in the lines with a traditional ink mixture of charcoal, vinegar, nut extract and tree sap. "The lines are smudged together," Baron said. "It's basically kosher, but needs correcting.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 9, 1998
"Latkes, like bagels, have gone mainstream," said Michael Batterberry, editor-in-chief of Food Arts Magazine, as he recently dipped his fork into - what else? - a crispy, plump, potato pancake.Although latkes may be ubiquitous, served at many restaurants year-round throughout the country, they are served once a year in many Jewish American homes as a symbolic food on Hanukkah, which begins this year at sundown on Sunday.The holiday celebrates the victory of the Jewish Maccabee brothers over Antiochus of Assyria in 164 B.C. When they returned to the ransacked temple, the Maccabees found a tiny bit of sacred olive oil that miraculously lasted not one, but eight days; the miracle is commemorated by eight days of lighting candles.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
CHAI's role in revitalizing Park HeightsAntero Pietila's Jan. 28 column, "The Necessities of a Jewish Home," chronicles the influx of Orthodox Jewish families in the Park Heights Avenue corridor. The many factors for this phenomenon -- from affordability of homes in the area to the establishment of the eruv -- were stated in the column.However, things do not happen in a vacuum. A major factor has been the work of Comprehensive Housing Assistance Inc. (CHAI), the housing development arm of The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore.
NEWS
By ANTERO PIETILA | January 28, 1995
"Coming soon,'' the sign says, ''17 luxury homes starting at $279,000."And this is Baltimore City?The real-estate market elsewhere in the city may be flat, but Bruce Scherr foresees no difficulty selling the houses he is about build near Bonnie View Country Club. The reason: the upscale homes are within walking distance of a dynamic Orthodox synagogue.''Fruppie houses,'' quips a neighbor, playing with the words ''yuppie'' and frum (observant).Major demographic shifts are taking place in Baltimore's Jewish community.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.