Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJewish Holidays
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Holidays

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
According to Jewish tradition, those who atone over the High Holidays for the sins of the past year will be granted peace, prosperity and life. As thousands of area Jews prepare to begin the solemn season Wednesday night amid high tensions in the Middle East, local rabbis say they've been praying that God might bestow similar good fortune on Israel. The topic of the Jewish homeland has long been an integral part of the religious observations for Rosh Hashana, which starts at sundown Wednesday, to Yom Kippur on Sept.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
According to Jewish tradition, those who atone over the High Holidays for the sins of the past year will be granted peace, prosperity and life. As thousands of area Jews prepare to begin the solemn season Wednesday night amid high tensions in the Middle East, local rabbis say they've been praying that God might bestow similar good fortune on Israel. The topic of the Jewish homeland has long been an integral part of the religious observations for Rosh Hashana, which starts at sundown Wednesday, to Yom Kippur on Sept.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | September 15, 1991
For 2,000 years, the Beta Israel lived apart from other Ethiopians and so isolated from the rest of the world that they thought they were the only Jews. This year many Beta Israel will observe Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur in Israel for the first time. The Ethiopian government has allowed many thousands of them to immigrate to Israel, where that country's government has helped them resettle.Who are these black Jews, survivors in a historically hostile land for 20 centuries? They call themselves Beta Israel, which means House of Israel.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
In one of the cases kicking off its fall term, Maryland's highest court is being asked whether a judge violated an Orthodox Jew's right to religious freedom by holding a medical malpractice trial without him and his lawyer during a major Jewish holiday. Lawyers for Alexander Neustadter of Silver Spring argued before the Maryland Court of Appeals last week that Montgomery County Circuit Court judges got so wrapped up in the "efficiency of the docket" that rather than delay the trial or suspend it for two days of Shavuot, the court trampled Neustadter's constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Jonathan Bor and Ed Heard and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writers | November 27, 1994
A book recently created by two people who never met will help some Jewish families learn more of their heritage tonight, when sundown marks the beginning of the eight-day observance of Hanukkah."
NEWS
By Retta Blaney | March 29, 1991
Brooklyn, N.Y. -- I HAVE LEARNED to read the signs in my neighborhood. As a Christian living in a Hasidic community, I will always be an outsider. I have come to appreciate, though, the cycle of the Jewish year and I am aware of the holidays not just because they are printed on my calendar, but because I see them unfolding around me.When I moved to the Midwood section of Brooklyn in 1985 from Oakenshawe in Baltimore, I had heard of the major Jewish holidays,...
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
We are in the middle of the Days of Awe, the 10 days between the Jewish high holidays of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. It's a time to reflect back on what you've done during the past year -- the good and the bad -- and then to apologize for the mistakes and work to correct them.Because that's easier said than done, it helps to share stories that illustrate the ideas of self-examination and atonement. Here are two books with stories tied to most of the Jewish holidays; reading them aloud could become a new family tradition.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
The worrisome thing for many Jews about the eight-day Hanukkah celebration, which begins tonight, is that, in the words of a popular holiday tune, "It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas."With more emphasis on gift-giving, creeping consumerism and the adoption of Christmas-like customs such as holiday cards and Hanukkah bushes, the deeper spiritual meaning of Hanukkah can be lost, says Shimon Apisdorf, a Baltimore author who wants to make the Jewish holidays more meaningful.Because it occurs around Christmas, Hanukkah is "so celebrated, particularly in North America, that it's taken on a whole new level of significance for people," said Apisdorf, a Pikesville resident and author of "Chanukah, Eight Nights of Light, Eight Gifts for the Soul."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The Anne Arundel County school system is considering making Yom Kippur a school holiday in response to parent and staff requests, officials said yesterday. Attendance data showing the number of students who take the day off for religious reasons also was a factor considered by officials who presented a tentative calendar for the next academic year. "Although our numbers are still low, they are growing," said Georgiana Maszczenski, an administrator in charge of designing the calendar. Baltimore and Howard County schools have observed Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah, both Jewish holidays, for years.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1991
In a table showing performance of Baltimore's elementary schools in yesterday's editions of The Sun, the heading showing the "Satisfactory" level of attendence according to State Board of Education standards was incorrect. The satisfactory attendence level should have been 94 percent.* The Sun regrets the error.With the fervor of a football coach, Pikesville High School English teacher Judy Koontz prepared a freshman class yesterday for the Maryland Functional writing test."What's our success rate?"
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | September 5, 2007
Every year as the Jewish High Holy Days approach, Amy Pollokoff goes shopping. She buys five dozen eggs, 30 pounds of sugar, 30 pounds of flour, 16 pounds of butter and two 4-pound bags of chocolate chips, among other things. Then, three weeks before her annual cookie party, the Owings Mills mother of two starts baking. She makes strudel and candy-bar cookies, Austrian nut-butter cookies and cream-cheese cookies. In all, she makes 21 kinds of cookies, doubling and tripling most recipes.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
JEWISH HOLIDAY FEASTS By Louise Fiszer and Jeannette Ferrary Chronicle Books / 2005 / $9.95 This little book is just what it says, a collection of recipes and menus for the Jewish holidays. Simple and straightforward, the recipes incorporate traditional ingredients in sometimes novel ways. Instead of roast chicken, for example, the authors offer a recipe of honey- and cumin-glazed cornish hens for a Rosh Hashana meal. Traditional apples and honey of a Jewish New Year feast are incorporated in a side dish with cooked red cabbage and wine.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2004
In an instant, the multipurpose room was filled with coughing, nose-blowing and red faces. Participants had just swallowed ground horseradish during a model Passover Seder at Howard Community College. But the bitter sharpness was quickly replaced - much to the group's delight - with a bite of a sweet, pasty mixture of apples, nuts, cinnamon and grape juice called charoset. These culinary extremes symbolize the centuries of slavery endured by the ancient Israelites in Egypt and their subsequent exodus, and they are also lessons for life, said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia, who led the Seder.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
A group of Muslim parents, students and community activists is lobbying for the Baltimore County school board to close schools on their two most important religious holidays of the year. If schools are closed Christmas and the Jewish High Holy Days, the group argues, it is only fair that they close on Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha as well. But amid cries for fairness and cultural sensitivity, others say closing schools on Muslim holidays would set a precedent the system would have to follow for any number of other religious and ethnic groups.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2004
As children nibbled on dates and figs, sampled grape juice and danced the horah to songs about planting, a bearded man named Honi appeared in a long, striped robe. The mesmerized children at Columbia's Beth Shalom Congregation listened as Honi explained that he had been asleep for generations after scoffing at another man for planting a carob tree for future grandchildren. But when Honi awoke to find the man's descendants picking carobs from the fully grown tree, he realized the importance of planting.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2003
It could have been a droll lecture on the story of Hanukkah. But when Rabbi Hillel Baron put on a toga, Roman helmet and shield, children and teachers moved closer as the director of Columbia's Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education brought the story to life. Baron, who spoke Wednesday to the preschool and kindergarten pupils at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, discussed how Judas Maccabaeus led the successful Jewish revolt in 164 B.C. against the Syrian-Greek regime that governed Israel.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | September 19, 1992
Hanukkah books may sell like hot cakes -- or is it latkes? -- but most of the big-name publishers don't offer children's titles dealing with Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, the holiest of Jewish holidays.It's easy to see why. The concepts of renewal, forgiveness, charity and repentance are central to the High Holy Days, which begin with Rosh Hashanah at sunset on Sept. 27 this year and run through Yom Kippur, on Oct. 6. Adults think kids have a hard time grasping those concepts.Even publishers of Jewish books have shied away from the subject.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 2003
Passover Seder guests of Eliyahu Rashid Levieddin can expect to be swatted by spring onions during a holiday song, sample Romaine lettuce dipped in vinegar and dine on celery stew with rice. These are just some holiday traditions Levieddin brought from his native Iran, where he lived until 1979. "It makes me proud to see the customs observed," said Levieddin, a Columbia chiropractor who will celebrate with his wife, Lisa, their five children and friends. "It's important for kids to see how they are passed on."
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2002
The Anne Arundel County school system is considering making Yom Kippur a school holiday in response to parent and staff requests, officials said yesterday. Attendance data showing the number of students who take the day off for religious reasons also was a factor considered by officials who presented a tentative calendar for the next academic year. "Although our numbers are still low, they are growing," said Georgiana Maszczenski, an administrator in charge of designing the calendar. Baltimore and Howard County schools have observed Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashana, both Jewish holidays, for years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.