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By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
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NEWS
May 8, 2014
A divided Supreme Court upheld the practice of public prayer before local government meetings ( "The local religion," May 6). The Carroll County Commissioners can resume their practice. This Orthodox Jewish former member of the House of Delegates is saddened. Justice Anthony Kennedy said the New York town of Greece's practice is compatible with the Constitution, not violating the First Amendment. He wrote: "...prayer that is solemn and respectful in tone, that invites lawmakers to reflect upon shared ideals before they embark on the fractious business of governing serves (a)
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NEWS
January 9, 2004
The Historical Society of Carroll County is displaying We Call This Place Home: Jewish Life in Maryland's Small Towns, an exhibit produced by the Jewish Museum of Maryland. The exhibit tells the story of Jewish merchants and other Jewish residents who established roots in small communities across Maryland. Stories and artifacts from several of Carroll County's Jewish merchants and families are featured, including pieces from the former Kann's Department Store, the Rosenstock Store, artifacts from Beth Shalom Congregation in Taylorsville, and items on loan from the Weiner and Holniker families in Eldersburg.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
As a 5-year-old sitting on his great-grandmother's knee in the 1950s in Philadelphia, Marc Young listened patiently as she whispered in broken English the same two sentences she would come to repeat in a weekly ritual for years. "God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai. Ever since, the Jews are a special people to God," Grandma Rose would tell him in her thick Ukrainian accent while gently rubbing his forearm with hands gnarled by years of menial labor. "She wasn't so much stroking my arm as she was trying to grind her message into my chromosomes," recalled Young, a longtime Columbia resident who is now 62. The outcome of her wish - that her great-grandson take her place in passing along stories of Jewish history, culture and folklore - will be on display when he takes part in "Tales of Nature: An Afternoon of Professional Storytelling.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 22, 1992
Who would have ever thought that a 40-year-old sugar cube from a Read's drugstore soda fountain would be enshrined in a serious exhibition of Baltimore history?Little details like this enliven the delightful new show "Fertile Ground, Two Hundred Years of Jewish Life in Baltimore" at the Jewish Historical Society's Lloyd Street headquarters in East Baltimore.It doesn't take long for a viewer to become fascinated and beguiled by this large room full of everyday objects known to many a Baltimorean.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | July 16, 1991
The history of Jewish people in Annapolis is like all history -- people famous and ordinary, noble and notorious, saintly and sinful.The pantheon of Annapolis Jews includes Albert Abraham Michelson, a Naval Academy midshipman who returned to the academy as a physics professor and became the first person to measure the speed of light.But there also was Jacob Lumbrozo, the first Jew in the colony, an unsavory doctor who became infamous for his numerous adulterous affairs and questionable medical procedures.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1998
The loss of two treasured pieces of Jewish heritage in the past four months in Annapolis appears to have stirred little notice in this 303-year-old city, where residents fiercely protect beloved old buildings.In December, a five-alarm fire destroyed Annapolis' first Jewish department store, leaving only a crumbling facade. Last month, flames destroyed its first synagogue.But Anna Greenberg, a 68-year-old city native, activist and guide for the small, private Jewish Heritage Tour of Annapolis, mourns the loss of the buildings -- not only the lost bricks and mortar, but the stories behind them.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
A 400-year-old Torah, saved from the sands of Iraq, has found its way to a synagogue in western Howard County. The scroll of Hebrew scripture, containing the first five books of the Bible, was found by U.S. soldiers among the ruins of a synagogue in Mosul, Iraq. A Jewish expert in Torahs who leads a worldwide effort to rescue scrolls like this got it out of the country and repaired it. Now, that piece of history has landed in Fulton, housed in an ark at Temple Isaiah. The Reform congregation plans a year of educational events centered on this Torah and the Jews of Arab nations, beginning today with presentations by Rabbi Menachem Youlus, who is a sofer, someone trained in the transcription of Torahs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Benjamin and Elizabeth Benjamin,ALBANY TIMES UNION | January 3, 1999
It took a lot of chutzpah for Stan Mack to do what he has done.To attempt to consolidate 4,000 years of Jewish history - from Abraham's first discussion with God in the desert to today's turmoil over peace in the Middle East - into a 265-page book and, of all things, in cartoons.But that is exactly what Mack, a 62-year-old New York City illustrator, set out to do in his new book, ``The Story of the Jews: A 4,000-Year Adventure.''``I concluded that there was room for a popular overview of Jewish history that put everything into perspective,'' said Mack.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
While I agree that how President Obama (or any president) might respond to an Israeli military strike in Iran is an important topic for any voter to consider, including Jewish voters, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich's rambling discussion of the topic is way off the mark ("Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel," Sept. 2). He seems of touch with most American Jewish voters. To suggest that Jewish citizens vote Democrat out of "habit" is insulting. Jewish voters are not one-issue voters (i.e.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
A couple years ago, African-American artist Loring Cornish was focusing his creativity on works that addressed the civil rights movement. When a Jewish couple, Ellen and Paul Saval, bought some other pieces of his, Cornish went to their home to hang the art. By the time he was finished, "something came over me," he said. "I don't what it was. But I realized then that I had to include the struggles of the Jewish people in my work about the African-American experience. I went home, flipped over the 8-by-8(-foot)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
NEWS
By Aron U. Raskas | June 7, 2009
As the Obama administration moves to transform Palestinian arguments about Israeli settlements into U.S. policy, an examination of the facts underlying these issues is appropriate. There may be no better place to begin than the swimming pool at Rimonim, a Jewish settlement in the heart of the West Bank. The scene is a familiar one. Families picnicking together. Mothers yelling at children to be careful. Young children calling out to moms to watch them do dangerous things. But it is the view from the hilltop pool that is striking.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | October 28, 2007
A 400-year-old Torah, saved from the sands of Iraq, has found its way to a synagogue in western Howard County. The scroll of Hebrew scripture, containing the first five books of the Bible, was found by U.S. soldiers among the ruins of a synagogue in Mosul, Iraq. A Jewish expert in Torahs who leads a worldwide effort to rescue scrolls like this got it out of the country and repaired it. Now, that piece of history has landed in Fulton, housed in an ark at Temple Isaiah. The Reform congregation plans a year of educational events centered on this Torah and the Jews of Arab nations, beginning today with presentations by Rabbi Menachem Youlus, who is a sofer, someone trained in the transcription of Torahs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 4, 1996
American cities have become increasingly crowded with buildings that offer "more of the same" -- architectural additions that resemble the structures to which they are attached so much that it's nearly impossible to tell what is original and what has been added.It can be far more difficult for an architect and client to design a building that grows out of its surroundings but contributes a new dimension.That's what the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has done with the design of the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a $2.25 million history and education center for which ground will be broken tomorrow at Lloyd and Watson streets in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 2, 2005
CHARLESTON, S.C. - The sign in the window of Max's Clothing Store is a symbol of a dying tradition in the South. The clothing shop, opened by the owner's Jewish immigrant father 70 years ago, is going out of business. It wasn't supposed to happen so soon. Maurice Krawcheck, 68, had planned to pass the company to his sons, just as his father, Max, had done. But one of his boys became a lawyer and the other, a clothing manufacturer. There was no one left to mind the store. Family-owned retail stores, many started by Jews who settled in the South as peddlers, have helped fuel the economies of Southern towns for 300 years.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
The Historical Society of Carroll County is displaying We Call This Place Home: Jewish Life in Maryland's Small Towns, an exhibit produced by the Jewish Museum of Maryland. The exhibit tells the story of Jewish merchants and other Jewish residents who established roots in small communities across Maryland. Stories and artifacts from several of Carroll County's Jewish merchants and families are featured, including pieces from the former Kann's Department Store, the Rosenstock Store, artifacts from Beth Shalom Congregation in Taylorsville, and items on loan from the Weiner and Holniker families in Eldersburg.
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