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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | December 28, 1992
In the Jewish immigrant's trunk are cooking utensils and clothes, a small menorah, a Yiddish book and silver cups for the ritual drinking of wine. "When you came," says Barry Kessler, "you brought your cultural heritage with you." Of course, not everybody had even those few things. "Many came with nothing but a pillow and a copper pot."The immigrant's trunk is one of the smaller segments, but perhaps the most moving, in the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland's exhibit "Fertile Ground: Two Hundred Years of Jewish Life in Baltimore."
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By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BALTIMORE will soon be the home of a $2.25 million history and education center that has been touted as the nation's"largest and most advanced facility for the study, understanding and appreciation of regional American Jewish history."The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has set May 5 as the groundbreaking for the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a 12,000-square-foot expansion of its three-building campus at 15 Lloyd St. near Lombard Street. When complete in late 1997, the brick-and-stone building will contain a 2,000-square-foot exhibition gallery, expanded library, visitor orientation center, museum shop, entrance court, staff offices and more than 4,000 square feet of new storage and processing space for the growing collection of documents and photographs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2008
When Ida Katz died earlier this month, a few days shy of her 100th birthday, her son, Dr. Morton I. Katz, a retired Pikesville orthodontist, said his mother had spent her early years living with her family at Yaazor, the Hebrew Colonial Society of Maryland's 351-acre commune that was on the border of Baltimore and Howard counties. Her death stills yet another voice from what has to be a dwindling band of survivors who can recall what daily life was like at Yaazor, because no trace of the community now exists.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 13, 1997
Raoul Wallenberg stamp to be presented todayMichael Furey, acting postmaster of Baltimore, will present an enlargement of the Raoul Wallenberg stamp to the Jewish Historical Society, 11 Lloyd St., at 11 a.m. today.The stamp honors the Swedish diplomat who rescued tens of thousands of Jews from the Nazis in Hungary.Members of the Baltimore Philatelic Society, former Wallenberg associate Herbert Froehlich and Eva Schomfeld, whose family survived largely because of Wallenberg's efforts, also will receive a framed commemorative of the stamp.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 3, 1994
Since the late 1970s, more than 7,000 Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union have come to Baltimore to live. For the last two years, photographer Cindy Gail Konits has been photographing recent immigrants in their daily lives. The results can be seen in "Now I See Kiev in My Dreams" at the Jewish Historical Society.The exhibit has faults, primarily its limited size. But its virtues are many, including its overall look. It combines Konits' large-scale (28 inches square) color photographs with quotes from the immigrants (in both English and Russian)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 17, 1997
The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has received a $60,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to document all pre-World War II synagogues in Maryland.The research will lead to the development of an extensive architectural and photographic exhibit titled "The Synagogues of Maryland."In announcing the grant, Maryland's Democratic Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes noted that the state is one of the oldest and richest areas of Jewish settlement and culture in the United States.
NEWS
February 15, 2006
ALMA B. HANDELMAN, age 82, of Reisterstown, formerly of Wilmington, DE, died February 13, 2006 in Wilmington, she had been a member of Cong. Beth Shalom and its sisterhood, Deborah Heart & Lung Foundation, Jewish Community Center, Volunteer at the Gift Shop of the A.I. du Pont Hospital for Children and the Jewish Historical Society. She is survived by her son, Fred A. Handelman of Reisterstown; grandchildren, Lisa Berman, Tom Handelman and Marcie Cooke; two nieces and a nephew. Graveside services are Thursday in Wilmington.
FEATURES
January 21, 1996
As the third decade of this century began, Baltimore's Jewish community had 20 organizations in place to help the needy within it. The concept of organized charity has deep roots in Judaism, and Baltimore Jewry was doing its part to continue the tradition. But in 1920 a question was raised: Why not unite those 20 separate charities into a single philanthropic and community-building organization? The unification proposal got the nod and in January 1921, the Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore was born.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 22, 1993
Although it may have seemed like an interesting idea, in practice it turns out to be a mistake to show "Bridges and Boundaries: African Americans and American Jews" in two different places for its Baltimore run.This challenging exhibit tracing the history of cooperation and conflict between two of America's minority populations was organized by the Jewish Museum in New York; it had the services of an African-American curator, Gretchen Sullivan Sorin....
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 24, 2007
Eleanor Betty Hirsh, an educator who championed preservation of the Lloyd Street Synagogue and was a founder of the Jewish Historical Society, died of cancer Sunday at her Pikesville home. She was 83. Born Eleanor Betty Rosenthal in Baltimore and raised in Mount Washington, she was a 1940 graduate of Forest Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education from Goucher College. She was known by her initials, E.B. She joined Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and in 1975 became the second woman to serve as its president.
NEWS
February 15, 2006
ALMA B. HANDELMAN, age 82, of Reisterstown, formerly of Wilmington, DE, died February 13, 2006 in Wilmington, she had been a member of Cong. Beth Shalom and its sisterhood, Deborah Heart & Lung Foundation, Jewish Community Center, Volunteer at the Gift Shop of the A.I. du Pont Hospital for Children and the Jewish Historical Society. She is survived by her son, Fred A. Handelman of Reisterstown; grandchildren, Lisa Berman, Tom Handelman and Marcie Cooke; two nieces and a nephew. Graveside services are Thursday in Wilmington.
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 13, 1997
Raoul Wallenberg stamp to be presented todayMichael Furey, acting postmaster of Baltimore, will present an enlargement of the Raoul Wallenberg stamp to the Jewish Historical Society, 11 Lloyd St., at 11 a.m. today.The stamp honors the Swedish diplomat who rescued tens of thousands of Jews from the Nazis in Hungary.Members of the Baltimore Philatelic Society, former Wallenberg associate Herbert Froehlich and Eva Schomfeld, whose family survived largely because of Wallenberg's efforts, also will receive a framed commemorative of the stamp.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 17, 1997
The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has received a $60,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to document all pre-World War II synagogues in Maryland.The research will lead to the development of an extensive architectural and photographic exhibit titled "The Synagogues of Maryland."In announcing the grant, Maryland's Democratic Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes noted that the state is one of the oldest and richest areas of Jewish settlement and culture in the United States.
NEWS
December 24, 1996
Harold Clem, 87, historian, national security authorityHarold J. Clem, a historian, political scientist and national security expert who helped restore democracy to Germany after World War II, died Friday at his home in Bethesda of congestive heart failure. He was 87.He was a political adviser to the U.S. Commission for the State of Bavaria from 1949 to 1952, helping restore democracy to what was then West Germany.The Frederick native also participated in an Allied postwar program to return artworks and other cultural property to nations looted by the Nazis.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
The true story of the Old Bay Line steamer that glided out of Baltimore harbor nightly on a circuit to Norfolk and wound up playing a role in the founding of Israel is one of those maritime sagas so rich it became a best-selling novel and then a movie.Now the passenger boat with two identities and lives -- one as the President Warfield, the other as the Exodus 1947 -- is the subject of a new exhibit at the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, where the ship's original brass bell and steam whistle are on display.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
Robert L. Weinberg, a prominent Baltimore real estate lawyer and community activist with a deep interest in local Jewish history, died Saturday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 72.Mr. Weinberg was to have received an award yesterday from the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland at its celebration of the 150th anniversary of the dedication of the Lloyd Street Synagogue.A longtime trustee of the society, Mr. Weinberg also was a leader in developing the Jewish Heritage Center at 15 Lloyd St. in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 2, 1991
Who would have ever thought an old cotton nightshirt, a beige raincoat and some men's cotton socks would be given a serious display at a local historical society?These garments, all made in Baltimore, are surviving artifacts from a once-thriving clothing industry. Local sweatshops, factories and tailoring rooms once outfitted the South. From the 1880s through the 1920s, men's clothing production was Baltimore's leading industry in terms of numbers employed."Threads of Life" is a new and instructive show at the Jewish Historical Society, Lloyd and Watson streets in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
If the Jewish family deli survives, it may one day have to thank the brisket at Martin Lev's Edmart Delicatessen in Pikesville. For it was there that the oven-roasted beef of L. John Harris' mother met its match.Harris, 49, is the director of the Deli Project, a national exploration into the history and success of the Jewish food phenomenon once so central to many neighborhood shopping districts. The project is being directed by the Judah Magnes Museum of Berkeley, Calif., in collaboration with the Jewish Historical Society of Maryland.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1996
BALTIMORE will soon be the home of a $2.25 million history and education center that has been touted as the nation's"largest and most advanced facility for the study, understanding and appreciation of regional American Jewish history."The Jewish Historical Society of Maryland has set May 5 as the groundbreaking for the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Building, a 12,000-square-foot expansion of its three-building campus at 15 Lloyd St. near Lombard Street. When complete in late 1997, the brick-and-stone building will contain a 2,000-square-foot exhibition gallery, expanded library, visitor orientation center, museum shop, entrance court, staff offices and more than 4,000 square feet of new storage and processing space for the growing collection of documents and photographs.
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