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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
It's true that Harriet Chaitovitz doesn't stand in a classroom and teach anymore. But one rabbi insists she's still "the classiest woman in Howard County."So on Wednesday, more than 100 parents and children gathered at Beth Shalom Congregation's synagogue on Guilford Road to honor Mrs. Chaitovitz, who this year retired as a nursery school and day care teacher at Bet Yeladim -- a religious school that rents space at the synagogue.Mrs. Chaitovitz received a plaque for helping to establish the county's first Jewish preschool 20 years ago.And to honor her, children dedicated Bet Yeladim playground's 260-foot pathway by drawing an outline of their feet with chalk.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | January 8, 2009
Baltimore Hebrew University, grappling with a long-term decline in enrollment, is in negotiations to become a part of Towson University, officials said. The state Board of Regents has informally indicated its approval of the talks. The plans are not complete, but the heads of both institutions said they believe negotiations will succeed. As part of Towson, Baltimore Hebrew would maintain its identity, said Jonathan Lowenberg, chairman of the board of the 90-year-old college. "Baltimore Hebrew University, as with any number of small universities around the country, faces financial issues and the ability to grow our programs as we think is appropriate," he said.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2000
Games of basketball and volleyball have ceased along with the all-night drives to New York City's Palladium or Atlantic City to dance to Latin rhythms. Memories of late-night cha-cha sessions in Baltimore's old Mount Royal Hotel's Pan-American Room are just that. There are a few more aches and pains than there used to be. Hair has turned gray and waists have thickened. Many have retired and most all are now grandparents. However, friendships made 60 years ago when they were kids growing up in East Baltimore remain as firm as when 10 boys decided to establish the Panther Club in the Jewish Education Alliance Building at Central Avenue and Baltimore Street.
NEWS
March 31, 2008
Hillendale Meeting to consider community plan A community meeting on developing an in-depth plan for the Hillendale area has been scheduled for Wednesday. The forum is the first in a series that will be held as residents, merchants and county officials work to draft a Community Conservation Plan for the greater Hillendale area. The 6:30 p.m. meeting will be held in the cafeteria of Halstead Academy, 1111 Halstead Road. Information: 410-887-2909, or e-mail mlynch@baltimorecounty md.gov.
NEWS
September 10, 1992
Theological seminar set"Theological Reflections on Current Urban Issues" will be the subject of an Ecumenical Institute seminar at 4 p.m. Sept. 20 at St. Mary's Seminary and University, 5400 Roland Ave. Graduates of the institute working in inner-city churches, social services and law enforcement will lead the discussions, open to the public.A reception at 5:30 and a dinner at 6:15 will follow. For information: 323-1463.Yesterday, the Ecumenical Institute at St. Mary's began its 24th year of graduate theological education.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
Noting that the Archdiocese of Baltimore recently pledged tens of millions of dollars to improve its schools, a group of rabbis and lay leaders is asking The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore to increase its financial support for Jewish day schools.The group, which calls itself Advocates for Leadership in Educational Funding, is seeking a threefold increase in The Associated's annual allocation for the private day schools that teach religious and secular courses.The Associated's annual campaign last year raised about $24 million for Jewish agencies here and in Israel.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
More than 300 Jewish women from Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania will gather in Baltimore tomorrow to reflect on what the Torah teaches about "Women as Architects of Peace," the theme of the second annual Women's Day of Torah, Inspiration and Growth. The event, sponsored by the Upper Park Heights-based Women's Institute of Torah, will feature 22 workshops in three sessions that will explore ways of building peace in global politics, in local communities, in the home and in the person.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
Less is more at Beth El Congregation's religious school.Youngsters in the Baltimore County synagogue's pioneering religious education program are spending less time in after-school and Sunday classes but more time "devoted to Jewish learning."And parents are spending less time in car lines and more in prayer and study, fostering not only their children's Jewish education, but also their own.Project Mishpacha -- Hebrew for family -- is innovative for the Conservative congregation of 1,700 on Park Heights Avenue and for Jewish education.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
When 7-year-old Hannah Chalew pulled the long, meaty bone from a boiled animal horn yesterday, her second-grade classmates responded with a resounding, "ee-YEW!""When I pulled out the bone, it was weird," said Hannah, who got a close-up look at the making of a shofar, or ceremonial ram's horn blown on Jewish high holy days.She was among 58 students from the Krieger-Schechter Day School, a Jewish school in Baltimore County, who visited the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia for the eye-opening demonstration.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
On Sunday, examine your conscience, Journeys Community's theme for this week's 10 a.m. Sunday service will be "Examen of Conscience" -- a method of prayer developed in 1541 by St. Ignatius of Loyola, which has since enabled believers and seekers to examine their thoughts, words and actions to deepen their relationship with God and others. Those who attend Sunday's service are invited to participate in the almost 500-year-old spiritual exercise for improving spiritual health. The group's Sunday services are held in the second-floor auditorium of Vantage House Life-Care Retirement Community, 5400 Vantage Point Road in Town Center, Columbia.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | January 22, 2007
It wasn't their mother's Sunday Hebrew School class, what with the panel discussions on cosmetic surgery and Jewish sex manuals and the yoga in the library. But the room was packed all the same. More than 100 people - 20-somethings, grandmothers and even a few teenagers - came to the Jewish Museum of Maryland yesterday to hear a half-dozen experts talk about everything from prayers said during pregnancy to what the Torah and other sacred texts have to say about intercourse. The event, "Women's Sexuality: Bodies, Beauty and the Ethics of Intimacy," was part of Rashi's Daughters, a Jewish education organization that, until now, has focused on teaching women about sacred texts in small groups during monthly gatherings.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,sun reporter | January 18, 2007
Jewish educators around Baltimore are studying an unusual topic this year: God. Teachers often shy away from discussions of God or defining beliefs at Jewish day schools and supplemental classes offered by congregations, said Lawrence M. Ziffer, the executive vice president of the Center for Jewish Education in Park Heights. "Most other religions have a lot of God talk," Ziffer said. In Judaism, however, "that almost never happens on a communal level." Instead, religious education usually covers areas such as holidays, rituals and liturgical or modern Hebrew.
NEWS
September 22, 2006
Rosh Hashana starts at 6:47 tonight Rosh Hashana, the solemn and joyous festival celebrating the Jewish New Year, begins tonight locally at 6:47 p.m., 18 minutes before sunset, when candles are lighted in Jewish homes to inaugurate the Sabbath and the holiday. "It's the Jewish New Year and the Day of Judgment, the day when we make a resolution to improve our ways, to make amends ... and go in God's way in the future," said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
I. Leon Glassgold, a retired civil engineer and construction business owner who was a founder of the Krieger Schechter Day School, died of stroke complications Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 81, and a resident of the Cheswolde neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore. Mr. Glassgold's business, Masonry Resurfacing and Construction Co., was founded by his father in 1928 in Philadelphia. He moved his father's business to Baltimore's Curtis Bay in 1954, and specialized in concrete bridge repairs.
NEWS
By From staff reports | September 10, 2004
In Baltimore County Pupil hurt in fall from bus upgraded to fair condition The Old Court Middle School pupil who fell out the emergency door of a moving school bus Tuesday was upgraded to fair condition yesterday at Sinai Hospital. Sedrick Alexander Bailey, 11 and a seventh-grader, had been in serious condition. Police and school officials said yesterday that they do not know whether Sedrick accidentally fell, jumped or was pushed out of the bus shortly after 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Windsor Mill section of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
One of the hardest parts of Rivkah Lambert Adler's new job is persuading people to take something for nothing. "You don't have to return it," Adler told a man yesterday as he dropped off a book at the Jewish Community Center in Owings Mills. "People can't really believe the books are totally free." Adler runs the "Book Shuk," a program that provides free, mostly secondhand books on Jewish subjects to improve adult Jewish education. The Shuk (Hebrew for marketplace) opened last summer to reach people who are only lightly involved in Jewish life, as well as those who are building home libraries devoted to Jewish subjects.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Staff Writer | January 17, 1994
They came from as far away as Richmond, Va., and Allentown, Pa., looking for new ways to teach old ideas.Nearly 700 people crowded into classrooms at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation on Park Heights Avenue yesterday to learn how to use Mother Goose rhymes to teach values, how to teach Judaic concepts through ecology and how to teach martial arts in Hebrew.The daylong series of workshops was one of eight miniconferences being held this year throughout the country for Jewish educators and others interested in religious studies, said Julie Auerbach of Cleveland, a board member of the national Coalition for the Advancement of Jewish Education.
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