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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 5, 1991
PARDESS HANNA, Israel -- When Melkamo Bimaro's uncle appeared at the Orthodox Jewish children's home where Melkamo lives, he brought astonishing news: The 6-year-old's parents were not dead but had been airlifted to Israel in Operation Solomon.People at Neve Michael Youth Village marveled upon hearing that Melkamo was no longer an orphan. But for those closest to him, and for Melkamo, the news was strangely disturbing.Haddas Said, his house mother, wept. She had talked with psychologists before she told him his mother had died in the first place.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 1, 2013
Nearly three years ago, I stood with neighborhood residents and preservationists before what looked like an abandoned and very sad West Baltimore brick castle. Below its remarkable towers and stout walls on Rayner Avenue, I thought that this venerable old orphanage would not make it another year. Clearly at the end of its days, it seemed ready to fall from its embankment and hit the street. It was vacant, lacking a good roof and was lightly boarded. It is owned by Coppin State University.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
For nearly four decades, Rabbi Moshe Weiss has engaged in a personal mission to minister to the remnant of Poland's Jewish community in Poland that was nearly eliminated by the Holocaust.His particular focus has been seeking out the "hidden children": those whose Jewish parents perished in concentration camps, were raised by Christian families and who as adults learned of their roots."Many [adoptive parents] would not tell the children who they are, but because of their intelligence, they found out," Weiss said in a telephone interview this week.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
IRENA SENDLER, 98 Saved children from Nazis Irena Sendler - a Polish social worker who helped save some 2,500 Jewish children from the Nazis by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto and giving them false identities - has died in Warsaw, Poland. She was 98. Ms. Sendler died at a hospital yesterday morning, her daughter, Janina Zgrzembska, told the Associated Press. Ms. Sendler had been hospitalized since last month with pneumonia. Born in Warsaw, Ms. Sendler was a social worker with the city's welfare department, masterminding the risky rescue operations of Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto during Nazi Germany's brutal World War II occupation.
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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
On Jan. 28, 1935, 13-year-old Erich Oppenheim stood before the congregation of his synagogue in the German town of Nentershausen on the day of his bar mitzvah and for the first time publicly read from the Torah. The next day, he and a younger brother boarded a ship for America to escape Nazi persecution, never to see their parents and two other brothers again. "Our father settled us in our cabin, blessed us for the last time and left," said a tearful Oppenheim, now 79. "I recall feeling sort of numb and lost."
NEWS
May 13, 2008
IRENA SENDLER, 98 Saved children from Nazis Irena Sendler - a Polish social worker who helped save some 2,500 Jewish children from the Nazis by smuggling them out of the Warsaw Ghetto and giving them false identities - has died in Warsaw, Poland. She was 98. Ms. Sendler died at a hospital yesterday morning, her daughter, Janina Zgrzembska, told the Associated Press. Ms. Sendler had been hospitalized since last month with pneumonia. Born in Warsaw, Ms. Sendler was a social worker with the city's welfare department, masterminding the risky rescue operations of Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto during Nazi Germany's brutal World War II occupation.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 30, 2007
The credit all goes to those kids in Kansas. If it were not for them, Irena would still be living in poverty. The president of Poland would not be kissing her hand. No one would bother with her. The children of Kansas put her on the map." - RENATA ZAJDMAN, 78, of Montreal, who at age 14 was rescued from the Warsaw ghetto, on four high school students whose research for a school play for National History Day eventually led to recognition for Irena Sendler, 90, an unsung Polish heroine of the Holocaust who saved some 2,500 Jewish children
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1995
For the past 20 years, Harriet Chaitovitz has gotten down and dirty -- squishing paints and gripping dirt, loving every minute of it. She did it all to educate and entertain her lively 4-year-old students at Bet Yeladim Nursery School and Day Care in Columbia."
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 11, 1990
PARIS -- The French government appears eager to drop prosecution of Rene Bousquet, the French Vichy chief of police who ordered the deportation of Jewish children, on charges of crimes against humanity.Recent reports that French President Francois Mitterrand had told associates he wanted to see the Bousquet case "buried" have aroused anger among survivors of the Holocaust, their families and human rights advocates. They are interpreting Mr. Mitterrand's alleged remarks as a signal that other French war criminals also will never be brought to trial.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
The Jewish Federation of Howard County will hold its annual Super Phone Day fund-raiser Sunday to help raise money for local and international Jewish services.The fund-raiser is part of the United Jewish Appeal's national phone campaign."This is our chance . . . to talk to many of the Jewish families in Howard County and explain to them what we do, why funds are needed, and on a one-to-one personal basis ask them for a commitment to the 1994 campaign," said Steve Shaw, director of the Jewish Federation of Howard County.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
There's no uncertainty in the Lindenbaums' living room about what holiday they are celebrating this year. The husband and wife once made merry in winter with a Christmas tree for Amanda, who was raised Catholic, and a Hanukkah menorah for Heath, who grew up Jewish. But now menorah stickers cling to the windows of their Pikesville home, which is strung indoors and out with blue and white lights in preparation for the holiday beginning tonight. Amanda and her husband decided last year to maintain a Jewish home for their two children, though they will still visit her parents for breakfast on Dec. 25. "We have a festive home, but it's not a Christmas tree home," she said.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 30, 2007
The credit all goes to those kids in Kansas. If it were not for them, Irena would still be living in poverty. The president of Poland would not be kissing her hand. No one would bother with her. The children of Kansas put her on the map." - RENATA ZAJDMAN, 78, of Montreal, who at age 14 was rescued from the Warsaw ghetto, on four high school students whose research for a school play for National History Day eventually led to recognition for Irena Sendler, 90, an unsung Polish heroine of the Holocaust who saved some 2,500 Jewish children
NEWS
September 7, 2007
Leo Reich, a retired Jewish educator and longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, died Monday of a bowel obstruction at Sinai Hospital. He was 82. Mr. Reich was born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he graduated from Thomas Jefferson High School. He attended Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin in Brooklyn before enlisting in the Army in 1943. He was a private with an Army engineering unit in France during World War II. After the war, he returned to Mesivita Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin.
FEATURES
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
On Jan. 28, 1935, 13-year-old Erich Oppenheim stood before the congregation of his synagogue in the German town of Nentershausen on the day of his bar mitzvah and for the first time publicly read from the Torah. The next day, he and a younger brother boarded a ship for America to escape Nazi persecution, never to see their parents and two other brothers again. "Our father settled us in our cabin, blessed us for the last time and left," said a tearful Oppenheim, now 79. "I recall feeling sort of numb and lost."
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1999
Marion Von Binsbergen could have tolerated the Nazis like much of the rest of Holland.Instead, the 22-year-old hid a Jewish family in a country house and posed as the children's mother. When a Nazi policeman came to search the house, she pulled out a gun and shot him dead."I had a small revolver another friend had given me just in case," Von Binsbergen later said. "I had never intended to use it. I felt I had no choice except to kill him. It still bothers me. And I'd do it again under the same circumstances."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1999
Plans by Clinton administration officials to move 20,000 Kosovo refugees to the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay have now been aborted. But their consideration recalls painful memories of the 1939 "Voyage of the Damned," when 930 Jewish refugees aboard the Hamburg-American liner St. Louis were denied entry into the United States.It's a sad chapter in U.S. history that is recalled in a new exhibit opening Monday at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.What happened to the St. Louis and its human cargo, coupled with the indifference of the Roosevelt administration to act, may have influenced President Clinton's decision in offering help to the Kosovars.
NEWS
February 28, 1997
More bans on guns seen as an answerPresident Clinton's proposal for a law requiring child-proof safety catches on guns is a feeble attempt to solve the gun crisis.Over 66 million people in the United States own guns. To what end? We lead the world overwhelmingly in gun deaths and gun injuries for adults and children.Congress should pass a law confining gun shipments and ownership to state and federal armed forces, duly constituted police and citizens who can convince a judge they need one for self-protection.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
In what its rabbi calls a historic moment, the county's first Jewish congregation soon will open the first Jewish religious school in Carroll County.The Beth Shalom school will house an office and four classrooms, offering children from preschool to high school lessons in Judaism and interaction with peers who share their beliefs.Jewish children in a predominantly gentile county such as Carroll often feel isolated, said Sharon Rosenbluth, who has taught religion at Beth Shalom for three years.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1999
Of all the holidays that Robin Kershbaum celebrates, Purim is clearly her favorite."Every year I wait for this time to come," said 8-year-old Robin, one of 2,000 people who crowded inside Long Reach High School in Columbia yesterday to celebrate the Jewish holiday carnival."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
For nearly four decades, Rabbi Moshe Weiss has engaged in a personal mission to minister to the remnant of Poland's Jewish community in Poland that was nearly eliminated by the Holocaust.His particular focus has been seeking out the "hidden children": those whose Jewish parents perished in concentration camps, were raised by Christian families and who as adults learned of their roots."Many [adoptive parents] would not tell the children who they are, but because of their intelligence, they found out," Weiss said in a telephone interview this week.
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