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By Abigail Green | May 28, 2013
Watch that necklace, Mommy! Jewelry's up for grabs - - and gums - when you've got a baby in your arms. But with Teething Bling your baby can chomp away. They're pendants and bangles made from the same FDA-approved BPA- and lead-free material as most teething toys. The Maryland-based, mom-launched company even has a celebrity following - Tori Spelling's a fan. They're available at Little Sunshine Trading Co. in Ellicott City and at smartmomjewelry.com .
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NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
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NEWS
March 12, 2010
- Federal regulators are recalling more children's jewelry because of high levels of the toxic metal cadmium. This time it's charm bracelets with a "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" theme sold at dollar-type stores. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says the items should immediately be taken away from children and thrown away. Cadmium emerged as a major safety concern this year after an Associated Press investigation reported that some children's jewelry contained as much as 91 percent of the heavy metal, a carcinogen that also can damage kidneys and bones.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Douglas R. Legenhausen, a jewelry designer and master craftsman who worked in iron, gold and silver, died Sept. 20 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson of complications from back surgery. He was 69. The son of Chester Legenhausen, a house painter, and June Legenhausen, a homemaker, Douglas Raymond Legenhausen was born in Queens, N.Y., and was raised in Ossining, N.Y., and Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y. After graduating in 1964 from Mahopac High School in Mahopac, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1969 from the Rochester Institute of Technology and a master's degree in 1972 in fine arts from the Rhode Island School of Design.
NEWS
By Krishana Davis | February 4, 2014
“Fun, affordable and edgy” is how Megan Openhyn, store manager of XO by Saxon's, describes the boutique jewelry store, which opened in November at the Boulevard at Box Hill in Abingdon. The shop's glass windows are lined with one-of-a-kind hair accessories and handbags  from U.S.-based and international brands like Botkier and Dareen Hakim. And it's the only destination in Maryland selling chic, artistic headbands and combs from New York's Colette Malouf. “They are done by hand and really exquisite,” Openhyn says.
EXPLORE
October 24, 2012
The following is compiled from police reports from the Cockeysville Precinct. Our policy is to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. Parkton York Road , 19300 block, at 12:48 a.m. Oct. 18. Cash stolen from safe at Park Inn. Entry by breaking back door. Phoenix Manda Mill Lane , 13700 block, between Oct. 11 and Oct. 14. Safe pried open and jewelry stolen. Unknown means of entry.
NEWS
April 27, 2010
Baltimore health officials ordered an Edmondson Avenue business to stop selling children's jewelry found to contain lead levels exceeding limits set by the city. The jewelry includes the "Neon Leaf Anklet Chain," and the "Neon Heart Anklet Chain" sold at JH Dollar & Party at 4618 Edmondson Ave. Both were found to have lead levels in excess of 600 parts per million, which is the city limit. For more information about the items and the city's campaign against lead in jewelry, visit baltimorehealth.
EXPLORE
November 28, 2011
The following is compiled from police reports from the Cockeysville Precinct. Our policy is to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. Parkton Cameron Ridge Court, 600 block, between 11:30 a.m. and 6:55 p.m. Nov. 21. Jewelry stolen from bedroom. Ladder stolen from neighbor then used to access second-floor bedroom. Kitzbuhel Road , unit block, between 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Nov. 22. Front door kicked in. Nothing taken.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 25, 1991
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Jewelry stores are doing a bustling business in Saddam City, the sprawling, poor section where 1.5 million Baghdad residents live. But the jewelers are not making many sales.Women are selling their jewelry -- items from their dowries or gifts from their husbands, a family's life savings in a place where people do not have bank accounts -- to raise cash to buy food and other goods.This is Iraq today, a country trying to cope with a changed economy, with fears of attack from abroad and of civil unrest within, and with the aftermath of a decade of almost continuous war.Even as President Bush vowed recently that the United States would not permit the "suffering of innocent women and children" in war-ravaged Iraq, prices of flour, rice and sugar have doubled in recent weeks as Iraqis have stocked up out of fear that renewed U.S. air attacks are coming.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
The violent attack on Janay Palmer by Ray Rice was deplorable and shocking, and he deserves the price he is paying for his actions. Janay is the victim, and she deserves our sympathy and prayers. She does not deserve the pain and humiliation cast upon her by the public spectacle of turning in anything that says Rice for other NFL merchandise, jewelry store credit and even food ( "Remember the victim," Sept. 10). Cut up your Ray Rice football jersey and use it for cleaning cloths.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
After nearly two months on the run, a couple wanted in jewelry store heists around Baltimore County and several states as far as South Carolina, was arrested at a hotel room off U.S. 40 in Catonsville Monday, police said. Robert Antoine Weathers, 53, and Robin Tracy Nelson, 50, are charged in multiple thefts at local jewelry and liquor stores around Baltimore County, including Bijoux Jewels in May, police said. On Wednesday, police identified a third suspect in the Bijoux as Stanley William Lester Gwynn of Elkridge.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Baltimore County police, along with a growing list of law enforcement agencies across several states, are searching for a Maryland pair who they say have stolen thousands of dollars in merchandise from jewelry stores. Baltimore County police said Robert Antoine Weathers, 53, and Robin Tracy Nelson, 50, took jewelry from an unlocked safe in the office of Bijoux Jewels at Green Spring Station's Gatehouse Shoppes on Falls Road on May 8. County police sent out a statement Monday asking for more information about the pair.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Nordstrom has launched a new shop-within-a-shop concept with online jewelry retailer BaubleBar. After testing sales of the merchandise in 35 locations since late March, the department store retailer is opening the "Nordstrom Loves BaubleBar" shops this month in all 117 stores, including at Towson Town Center and online. The brand, started in 2011, aims to quickly identify current trends in jewelry fashion. It promises fresh styles five days a week in necklaces, earrings, bracelets and rings.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
The following is compiled from police reports. It is the Baltimore Messenger's policy to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. If you have any information about these crimes, call the Baltimore City Police Department's Northern District at 410-396-2455. Belvedere Avenue (West) 2500 block, between 7 p.m. June 2 and 5:17 p.m. June 5. Front and rear Maryland tags 9BC315 stolen from white, 2001 GMC truck. 2400 block, between 12:30 and 5 a.m. June 1. iPhone 5 stolen from vehicle.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
As crowds poured into Pimlico on Saturday afternoon, a dedicated crew of entrepreneurs set up outside the track, hoping to lure customers with deals on parking or tickets. Peanuts, barbecue and even jewelry were on sale, along with the "ice cold" bottled water offered for a dollar by enterprising vendors at every major event in Baltimore. Carlton Graham, 39, waved a large cardboard sign at passing cars advertising $25 parking just a block from the track. Graham, who said he's been a Park Heights resident his whole life, has worked with neighbors selling race-day parking spaces in yards and driveways.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Shoppers have come to know the Pandora name for glittering displays of customized sterling bracelets and gemstone charms sold by jewelers or the company's own retailers. But the Danish company kept a lower profile for its Maryland connection — a U.S. headquarters that's been lodged in Columbia since the brand arrived in the country in 2003. At first, the small headquarters didn't garner much notice; then the company didn't want to advertise the location because its warehouse was filled with high-priced goods.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 27, 2014
The following is compiled from police reports from the Towson and Cockeysville precincts. Our policy is to include descriptions when there is enough information to make identification possible. An intruder stole a computer and jewelry from a residence in the 6200 block of Falls Road, after kicking in a rear kitchen door to gain entry, police reports state. According to the report, the intruder entered the home between 8:30 a.m. and 1:54 p.m. ransacked several rooms stole the items and fled.
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