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By Marty McGee | September 8, 1991
Lucky Virginian drew off from six rivals turning for home and posted a 2 1/2 -length victory in the $44,675 Jet Pilot Stakes at Pimlico Race Course yesterday.Mike Luzzi rode the 2-year-old colt for owner Buckland Farm and trainer Ross Pearce."He just cruised home," Luzzi said.Lucky Virginian led from the start of the 5-furlong turf event, with Older But Smarter in closest pursuit. Into the stretch, Lucky Virginian pulled away while Coin Collector, the 9-10 favorite, rallied inside of Older But Smarter.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The automatic distress signal came in to the Coast Guard about 10:30 p.m. Thursday: A D.C. Air National Guard pilot had ejected from a fighter jet some 35 miles off Chincoteague Island in Virginia. As a rescue team sprang into action, another fighter pilot was flying a damaged F-16C Fighting Falcon back to the D.C. air guard's headquarters at Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County. Two others were circling the site where the fighters had collided. One jet was lost, to the likely tune of more than $20 million, and another was damaged.
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NEWS
March 1, 1994
Retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Laurence C. "Bill" Craigie, 92, America's first military jet pilot and an air command veteran of World War II and the Korean War, died yesterday at March Air Force Base hospital in Riverside, Calif. General Craigie, who was involved in developing many types of military aircraft in the 1930s and '40s, was one of the first two pilots to fly the Bell XP-59A Airacomet, developed in secrecy as the first U.S. jet airplane.@
NEWS
March 30, 2012
This week's apparent mental breakdown by a Jet Blue pilot could have had a very different ending. Imagine that the ill pilot had pulled the gun that many pilots now carry and started a gunfight in the cockpit. The law that allows pilots to bring arms onto planes was enacted following the9/11tragedy. But over the years, we watched time and again as brave passengers have dealt with safety threats directly without the need of armed force. Within recent weeks we've witnessed graphic on-board meltdowns by a flight attendant and now a pilot.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
Before television sports reporters came to dominate the medium, there was Clem McCarthy, working alone, without "color reporters," mesmerizing sports fans nationwide with his radio coverage.During the golden age of sportscasting, McCarthy was a household name who shared broadcasting glory with such celebrities of the era as Graham MacNamee, Ted Husing and Bill Stern.McCarthy, whose gravel-voice delivery was once described as resembling "two pieces of sandpaper that had learned to talk by rubbing themselves together," covered every Kentucky Derby from 1928 to 1951.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
The Bethesda man accused of posing as a commercial jet pilot to bilk airline employees and childhood friends of thousands of dollars has been committed to a private psychiatric hospital. State doctors said Daniel Shykind, 31, is not dangerous and can be treated with drugs and therapy for delusional behavior. In November, Shykind was found incompetent to stand trial on fraud charges after he refused to help prepare his defense, claiming he was a secret agent under orders from the CIA. UPDATE:  The charges and court records were ultimately expunged.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Twenty-two years in the Navy and Monday was his first combat mission, the one where he packed a pistol and a peanut butter sandwich, and flew off a carrier deck in the Arabian Sea and on to Afghanistan. His country might own the skies above a foreign land but the Navy captain, first name Chuck, admitted that this was different, unlike training. He was fully loaded with live bombs now, heading north over Pakistan and into the night. "The tension," he said later.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The automatic distress signal came in to the Coast Guard about 10:30 p.m. Thursday: A D.C. Air National Guard pilot had ejected from a fighter jet some 35 miles off Chincoteague Island in Virginia. As a rescue team sprang into action, another fighter pilot was flying a damaged F-16C Fighting Falcon back to the D.C. air guard's headquarters at Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County. Two others were circling the site where the fighters had collided. One jet was lost, to the likely tune of more than $20 million, and another was damaged.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | June 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Prompted by a December plane crash in Santa Ana, Calif., the Federal Aviation Administration will begin warning jetliner pilots to approach airports at flatter angles to avoid sending killer turbulence into the path of other aircraft.But the warnings, which the FAA will start issuing Friday, will not go as far as standard approach paths recommended by the National Transportation Safety Board. That's because of fears that mandatory changes would reduce the number of planes that airports can handle, an FAA official said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman, Jay Hancock and Frank Langfitt and Tom Bowman, Jay Hancock and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - New information from U.S. crew members about the collision of a Chinese jet fighter and a Navy spy plane shows that the Americans were not at fault, U.S. officials said yesterday, stiffening Washington's resolve in rebuffing Beijing's demands for an apology. Interviews with the detained 24 crew members held on Hainan Island reveal that Chinese pilot Wang Wei passed three times below the lumbering EP-3E reconnaissance craft - once within two or three feet - before striking the U.S. plane's left wing with its tail and plunging into the sea, said Pentagon officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2001
An American Airlines pilot concerned about the credentials of an Arab-American Secret Service agent on President Bush's security detail ordered the agent off his flight Tuesday night as it prepared to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport for Texas, an airline official said yesterday. The captain denied passage to the armed agent after reviewing his paperwork and credentials and observing "discrepancies," said Laura Mayo, an airline spokeswoman. The flight eventually took off without the agent.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 11, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Twenty-two years in the Navy and Monday was his first combat mission, the one where he packed a pistol and a peanut butter sandwich, and flew off a carrier deck in the Arabian Sea and on to Afghanistan. His country might own the skies above a foreign land but the Navy captain, first name Chuck, admitted that this was different, unlike training. He was fully loaded with live bombs now, heading north over Pakistan and into the night. "The tension," he said later.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman, Jay Hancock and Frank Langfitt and Tom Bowman, Jay Hancock and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - New information from U.S. crew members about the collision of a Chinese jet fighter and a Navy spy plane shows that the Americans were not at fault, U.S. officials said yesterday, stiffening Washington's resolve in rebuffing Beijing's demands for an apology. Interviews with the detained 24 crew members held on Hainan Island reveal that Chinese pilot Wang Wei passed three times below the lumbering EP-3E reconnaissance craft - once within two or three feet - before striking the U.S. plane's left wing with its tail and plunging into the sea, said Pentagon officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
Pilots from the Maryland Air National Guard -- endearingly referred to as "Warthog Warriors" -- left the friendly skies of their home state early yesterday for the more uncertain and dangerous environs over Iraq.Aviators and maintenance personnel from the 104th Fighter Squadron of the guard's 175th Wing, some with families waving goodbye before sunrise yesterday, departed from Martin State Airport in Middle River for a 90-day deployment to help enforce the United Nations "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
The Bethesda man accused of posing as a commercial jet pilot to bilk airline employees and childhood friends of thousands of dollars has been committed to a private psychiatric hospital. State doctors said Daniel Shykind, 31, is not dangerous and can be treated with drugs and therapy for delusional behavior. In November, Shykind was found incompetent to stand trial on fraud charges after he refused to help prepare his defense, claiming he was a secret agent under orders from the CIA. UPDATE:  The charges and court records were ultimately expunged.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1997
Before television sports reporters came to dominate the medium, there was Clem McCarthy, working alone, without "color reporters," mesmerizing sports fans nationwide with his radio coverage.During the golden age of sportscasting, McCarthy was a household name who shared broadcasting glory with such celebrities of the era as Graham MacNamee, Ted Husing and Bill Stern.McCarthy, whose gravel-voice delivery was once described as resembling "two pieces of sandpaper that had learned to talk by rubbing themselves together," covered every Kentucky Derby from 1928 to 1951.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
Pilots from the Maryland Air National Guard -- endearingly referred to as "Warthog Warriors" -- left the friendly skies of their home state early yesterday for the more uncertain and dangerous environs over Iraq.Aviators and maintenance personnel from the 104th Fighter Squadron of the guard's 175th Wing, some with families waving goodbye before sunrise yesterday, departed from Martin State Airport in Middle River for a 90-day deployment to help enforce the United Nations "no-fly" zone over southern Iraq.
NEWS
March 30, 2012
This week's apparent mental breakdown by a Jet Blue pilot could have had a very different ending. Imagine that the ill pilot had pulled the gun that many pilots now carry and started a gunfight in the cockpit. The law that allows pilots to bring arms onto planes was enacted following the9/11tragedy. But over the years, we watched time and again as brave passengers have dealt with safety threats directly without the need of armed force. Within recent weeks we've witnessed graphic on-board meltdowns by a flight attendant and now a pilot.
NEWS
By Orange County Register | June 27, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Prompted by a December plane crash in Santa Ana, Calif., the Federal Aviation Administration will begin warning jetliner pilots to approach airports at flatter angles to avoid sending killer turbulence into the path of other aircraft.But the warnings, which the FAA will start issuing Friday, will not go as far as standard approach paths recommended by the National Transportation Safety Board. That's because of fears that mandatory changes would reduce the number of planes that airports can handle, an FAA official said.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
Retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Laurence C. "Bill" Craigie, 92, America's first military jet pilot and an air command veteran of World War II and the Korean War, died yesterday at March Air Force Base hospital in Riverside, Calif. General Craigie, who was involved in developing many types of military aircraft in the 1930s and '40s, was one of the first two pilots to fly the Bell XP-59A Airacomet, developed in secrecy as the first U.S. jet airplane.@
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