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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | September 22, 2006
If, as he has said, Fearless is Jet Li's final martial-arts film, then he is leaving the genre in glorious style with this magnificent ode to honor, friendship, responsibility, dedication, grace and about a dozen other timeless virtues. Oh, yeah, and even at 43, Li can still kick it. Jet Li's Fearless (Rogue Pictures) Starring Jet Li, Yong Dong, Li Sun. Directed by Ronny Yu. Rated PG-13. Time 103 minutes.
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August 26, 2012
now playing "The Bourne Legacy" (PG-13). The actions of Jason Bourne have consequences for another man with a similar secret background. With Jeremy Renner, Rachel Weisz, Edward Norton, Joan Allen, Albert Finney. TownMall Cinemas (1:00, 4:00, 7:00 p.m.) "The Campaign" (R). In this political comedy, a multi-term congressman (Will Ferrell) commits a major public gaffe before an election, prompting a challenge by an inexperienced regular citizen. With Will Ferrell, Zach Galifianakis, Jason Sudeikis, Katherine La Nasa, Dylan McDermott, John Lithgow, Dan Aykroyd and Brian Cox. TownMall Cinemas (1:40, 4:40, 7:40 p.m.)
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | December 17, 2006
JET LI'S FEARLESS -- Universal Studios Home Entertainment -- $29.95 Twelve years after making what many regard as the definitive martial arts flick, 1994's Fist of Legend, Beijing-born Jet Li announced that he was leaving behind the movies that made him an international star. His last wushu film would be this year's Fearless, a tribute to his spiritual and martial-arts mentor, legendary Chinese master Huo Yuanjia. Talk about leaving on top; Fearless is more than one of Li's best films, a work true to his art's ultimately pacifist spirit.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | April 18, 2008
Kung fu purists may scoff, but escapists with a sense of humor should romp through The Forbidden Kingdom. It teams Hong Kong superstars Jackie Chan and Jet Li for the first time in an American/Mandarin fantasy that showers affectionate irreverence on martial-arts classics as well as kitsch milestones like The Karate Kid. In an irresistibly giddy story that plays mix and match with mythologies from Chinese legendry and Greek fable to pulp fiction, Michael...
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By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,Chicago Tribune | September 22, 2006
Jet Li wants to clear something up. The international action star is not retiring -- but Jet Li's Fearless (opening today) will be his final martial arts film. So what's that mean? "This is the last one, because everything I believe is in this film," says Li. Future films will have action, he said, but Fearless, a mildly mythologized biography of 1900s martial arts master Huon Yuan Jia, marks the end of his kung fu career. That's like John Wayne announcing he's giving up Westerns. But it's time, said Li, star of more than 30 films including kung fu classics such as Zhang Yimou's Hero and Tsui Hark's Once Upon a Time in China quintet.
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By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | August 26, 2004
If the Olympics aren't providing enough proof that fighting for what you want can pay off, consider Jet Li and Hero for renewed inspiration. Directed by one of the most revered mainland Chinese filmmakers in history, Zhang Yimou, Hero was released as Ying xiong in China two years ago and became the most popular Chinese-made movie ever released in that country. It was later a hit in Europe and was even nominated for a 2003 Oscar after brief qualifying runs in Los Angeles and New York. Hero, however, remained on the shelf of U.S. distributor Miramax while the company considered how to handle the historical drama about a local sheriff (Li)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2000
It's a good thing there's so much going on in "Romeo Must Die," what with all the shooting, the martial arts mayhem, the gals in skimpy clothes and the guys brimming with 'tude. Such non-stop adrenalin rushes make the story holes and convoluted plotlines almost forgivable. Almost. Just don't think about what's going on, and you should be OK. Set in Oakland, "Romeo Must Die" pits the Asian owners of one half of the city's waterfront district against the African-American owners of the other half.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 6, 2001
Fans of old Hollywood movies live in hope - and usually in vain - for a male-female team with the oomph and durability of Hepburn and Tracy or O'Hara and Wayne. Since most films these days are designed as single-star vehicles, the balance typically isn't there and the possibilities elicit boredom or derision. This spring, the romantic hit of the season was "Bridget Jones's Diary," a showcase for Renee Zellweger with Hugh Grant and Colin Firth in supporting roles. Occasionally you get a Richard Gere willing to step back and showcase a Julia Roberts ("Pretty Woman," "Runaway Bride")
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | April 18, 2008
Kung fu purists may scoff, but escapists with a sense of humor should romp through The Forbidden Kingdom. It teams Hong Kong superstars Jackie Chan and Jet Li for the first time in an American/Mandarin fantasy that showers affectionate irreverence on martial-arts classics as well as kitsch milestones like The Karate Kid. In an irresistibly giddy story that plays mix and match with mythologies from Chinese legendry and Greek fable to pulp fiction, Michael...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 8, 2006
Tony Jaa is such an athletic marvel, the latest in a line of cinematic martial-arts masters that stretches from Bruce Lee through Jackie Chan to Jet Li, that watching him onscreen is alone worth the price of admission. That's a good thing when it comes to a film like The Protector, which has precious little else to offer. It's thrilling to watch Jaa, the most entertaining Thai import since The King and I, scamper up walls, somersault over his attackers, crack the heads of opponents twice his size and just generally use adrenaline in more creative ways than most of us have ever imagined.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun staff | December 26, 2006
In a rowdy Bolton Hill tavern, they argued over whether the black bile spewing from kung-fu hero Jet Li's mouth was really chocolate sauce or chewing-tobacco juice. Down at a Fells Point watering hole, the debate was also juice-related: whether to stick with the 2002 Joel Gott zinfandel or sample the 1986 chardonnay from Cakebread Cellars. Over National Bohemian beer and popcorn, stuffed lobster and Chateauneuf-du-Pape, two rather different groups of urban dwellers spent Christmas Day in an untraditional, but quintessentially Baltimorean, setting: the neighborhood bar. "I figured years ago that there were other people like me out there, who did not have anything to do or anywhere to go," said Mount Royal Tavern bartender Mick King, who has been hosting a "Kung-Fu Christmas" party in the Bolton Hill dive bar for five years.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | December 17, 2006
JET LI'S FEARLESS -- Universal Studios Home Entertainment -- $29.95 Twelve years after making what many regard as the definitive martial arts flick, 1994's Fist of Legend, Beijing-born Jet Li announced that he was leaving behind the movies that made him an international star. His last wushu film would be this year's Fearless, a tribute to his spiritual and martial-arts mentor, legendary Chinese master Huo Yuanjia. Talk about leaving on top; Fearless is more than one of Li's best films, a work true to his art's ultimately pacifist spirit.
FEATURES
By Robert K. Elder and Robert K. Elder,Chicago Tribune | September 22, 2006
Jet Li wants to clear something up. The international action star is not retiring -- but Jet Li's Fearless (opening today) will be his final martial arts film. So what's that mean? "This is the last one, because everything I believe is in this film," says Li. Future films will have action, he said, but Fearless, a mildly mythologized biography of 1900s martial arts master Huon Yuan Jia, marks the end of his kung fu career. That's like John Wayne announcing he's giving up Westerns. But it's time, said Li, star of more than 30 films including kung fu classics such as Zhang Yimou's Hero and Tsui Hark's Once Upon a Time in China quintet.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | September 22, 2006
If, as he has said, Fearless is Jet Li's final martial-arts film, then he is leaving the genre in glorious style with this magnificent ode to honor, friendship, responsibility, dedication, grace and about a dozen other timeless virtues. Oh, yeah, and even at 43, Li can still kick it. Jet Li's Fearless (Rogue Pictures) Starring Jet Li, Yong Dong, Li Sun. Directed by Ronny Yu. Rated PG-13. Time 103 minutes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 8, 2006
Tony Jaa is such an athletic marvel, the latest in a line of cinematic martial-arts masters that stretches from Bruce Lee through Jackie Chan to Jet Li, that watching him onscreen is alone worth the price of admission. That's a good thing when it comes to a film like The Protector, which has precious little else to offer. It's thrilling to watch Jaa, the most entertaining Thai import since The King and I, scamper up walls, somersault over his attackers, crack the heads of opponents twice his size and just generally use adrenaline in more creative ways than most of us have ever imagined.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 2, 2005
A new Bond? Who cares? Who needs Bond? We've got The Transporter 2. The second installment of this French-engineered, Brit-starring, Hong Kong-styled action series is more slam-bang and much sillier than the original. It loses some of the lean, mean minimalism of The Transporter and crosses over into Bond far-fetchedness in its plot and stunts. But it's still a noisy, goofy, cartoonishly violent ride. This time, our transporter, played by the bullet-headed, rule-spouting Jason Statham, is running his particular brand of delivery service in Miami.
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November 2, 2001
The One Rated PG-13 (Violence). Sun score: ** The One is all sound and fury, and nothing else. Save for the intriguing sci-fi premise that alternate universes exist, The One offers little but guys fighting and bullets flying, interspersed with momentary lulls. Jet Li, who normally exhibits a lot more charisma than he does here, plays a dual role. In one universe, he's Gabriel Yulaw, a megalomaniac out for power and glory. His mission: visit each alternate universe via wormholes that open up sporadically, find his alternate self, and kill him. Each time he succeeds, he becomes more powerful.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 18, 1996
In a game attempt to take up some of the slack left by the departure of the Baltimore Film Forum, the Charles will run the occasional retrospective film series, titled "Monday Screens at the Charles," beginning tonight with the first of five Hong Kong action films.The timing is brilliant, as two vets of the Hong Kong scene, John Woo and Jackie Chan, have just made successful assaults on the American market; director Woo with his dazzling "Broken Arrow" and star Chan with the lighter-than-air astonishment "Rumble in the Bronx."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 13, 2005
Unleashed doesn't make a lick of sense, but it struggles so valiantly to be more than just another slam-bang affair that one can't help but get caught up in the effort. Hey, any martial-arts film in which piano playing is more important than fisticuffs deserves to be cut some slack. Screenwriter Luc Besson, who both wrote and directed 1994's The Professional, once again probes the question of how to civilize the savage beast. In The Professional, it was a protective instinct - directed first at a plant, then at a young girl - that brought out the humanity in a professional killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- One film into his career, and Thai actor Tony Jaa is being compared to Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan and Jet Li. That's heady company for an actor looking to specialize in martial-arts films, but Jaa isn't quite ready to embrace the hype. "In terms of replacing Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan or Jet Li, I would never consider that," Jaa says through an interpreter. "They are my mentors, and my masters." But if Jaa isn't ready to proclaim himself the new martial arts superstar, plenty of other people are. Fan Web sites have been abuzz about his film, Ong-Bak: The Thai Warrior, since it was released in Asia and Europe two years ago; at the 2003 Toronto Film Festival, audience members were so adrenalized by the movie, according to The New York Times, that they didn't want to leave the theater.
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