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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
Congress will hold hearings on the dumping of fuel over Baltimore-Washington International Airport and on the runoff of plane de-icing fluids into waterways near the airport if Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest gets his way.Gilchrest, who met with Federal Aviation Administration officials yesterday to go over a report he had requested from them about jet fuel jettisoned over the neighborhoods around BWI, said later he has decided to press for hearings on that issue....
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NEWS
July 13, 2011
While it is nice to see President Barack Obama talk to the American people more ("Obama calls GOP bluff," July 12), I don't think he has the mix right and speaks condescendingly toward us about the deficit. I am a Republican who is constantly reconsidering becoming an independent due to its leadership of both the House and Senate. I do my best to eat my peas — and mind my Qs — but I find it humorous to be lectured about corporate jet owners from the president when he and his family appear to be the biggest jet users around (and not on corporate money, but paid by the taxpayers)
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NEWS
July 13, 2011
While it is nice to see President Barack Obama talk to the American people more ("Obama calls GOP bluff," July 12), I don't think he has the mix right and speaks condescendingly toward us about the deficit. I am a Republican who is constantly reconsidering becoming an independent due to its leadership of both the House and Senate. I do my best to eat my peas — and mind my Qs — but I find it humorous to be lectured about corporate jet owners from the president when he and his family appear to be the biggest jet users around (and not on corporate money, but paid by the taxpayers)
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Hoping to make some green out of going green, Annapolis officials are weighing an ambitious plan to convert an old municipal dump into a "renewable energy park" that would generate enough electricity to supply all of the power the state capital consumes, using landfill gas, yard waste and the sun's rays for fuel. The City Council is expected to vote soon on an agreement with a Linthicum-based business group to produce electricity on 500 acres of city-owned land near Parole. The project could net the city up to $750,000 a year in revenue and savings while demonstrating a variety of renewable-energy technologies, proponents say. As a bonus, a little-used public park next to the former landfill would be improved, creating an arboretum-like native plant garden in the meadows and woods surrounding the city's old reservoir.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2007
Cheating, whether it occurs in sports, war, politics or academia, is as old as time. The Iliad and The Odyssey, two of mankind's oldest and greatest works of literature, are full of tales of deception and trickery, and most of it is done in the pursuit of victory. So can we really blame Michael Waltrip, the sandy-haired, aging NASCAR driver with Hasselhoff good looks, for allegedly turning a blind eye this week as his race crew tried to sneak, according to the Associated Press, a jet fuel additive into his stock car during qualifying for the Daytona 500?
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 7, 1991
As 1991 begins, the travel business is fraught with uncertainty and potential trouble.Not only is the economy expected to stay in its slump for at least six more months, but a Mideast war also could send oil prices soaring, igniting another round of increases for gasoline and jet fuel.Besides making autos more expensive to operate, increases in the price of jet fuel would mean higher airfares and further consolidation of the airline industry, which in turn would diminish competition, industry officials and analysts say.The airlines' financial situation may have its biggest effect on the international market.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 23, 2008
United Airlines and US Airways said yesterday that they would cut even more deeply into their flying during the fourth quarter, while JetBlue Airways said it would defer more aircraft deliveries, steps the carriers blamed on record prices for jet fuel. All three airlines reported losses in the second quarter compared with profits in the period a year ago. They joined other big airlines, including American, Continental and Delta, in posting second-quarter losses in the past week. Northwest Airlines is to report its results today.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1997
A high temperature in TWA Flight 800's center fuel tank made it much more prone to an explosion caused even by a low-level spark, a California Institute of Technology scientist testified yesterday.Tests showed that increasing the temperature in the fuel tank from 86 degrees to 140 degrees magnified the risk of explosion by 100,000 times, Dr. Joseph Shepherd testified during the second day of the National Transportation Safety Board's hearings at the Baltimore Convention Center into the explosion aboard the Paris-bound flight in July 1996.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Hoping to make some green out of going green, Annapolis officials are weighing an ambitious plan to convert an old municipal dump into a "renewable energy park" that would generate enough electricity to supply all of the power the state capital consumes, using landfill gas, yard waste and the sun's rays for fuel. The City Council is expected to vote soon on an agreement with a Linthicum-based business group to produce electricity on 500 acres of city-owned land near Parole. The project could net the city up to $750,000 a year in revenue and savings while demonstrating a variety of renewable-energy technologies, proponents say. As a bonus, a little-used public park next to the former landfill would be improved, creating an arboretum-like native plant garden in the meadows and woods surrounding the city's old reservoir.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | January 18, 2007
NEW YORK -- AMR Corp. earned a surprise fourth-quarter profit and Southwest Airlines Co. said its net income fell, demonstrating how fuel-pricing decisions dictate carriers' finances even when their planes are full and fares are rising. American Airlines parent AMR posted a $17 million profit compared with a year-earlier loss as its jet-fuel bill slid 8.5 percent. Southwest's profit dropped 19 percent on a 41 percent jump in fuel spending. Fuel expense rose at Southwest, the most profitable U.S. airline, as contracts for locking in prices also increased.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 23, 2008
United Airlines and US Airways said yesterday that they would cut even more deeply into their flying during the fourth quarter, while JetBlue Airways said it would defer more aircraft deliveries, steps the carriers blamed on record prices for jet fuel. All three airlines reported losses in the second quarter compared with profits in the period a year ago. They joined other big airlines, including American, Continental and Delta, in posting second-quarter losses in the past week. Northwest Airlines is to report its results today.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2007
Cheating, whether it occurs in sports, war, politics or academia, is as old as time. The Iliad and The Odyssey, two of mankind's oldest and greatest works of literature, are full of tales of deception and trickery, and most of it is done in the pursuit of victory. So can we really blame Michael Waltrip, the sandy-haired, aging NASCAR driver with Hasselhoff good looks, for allegedly turning a blind eye this week as his race crew tried to sneak, according to the Associated Press, a jet fuel additive into his stock car during qualifying for the Daytona 500?
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | January 18, 2007
NEW YORK -- AMR Corp. earned a surprise fourth-quarter profit and Southwest Airlines Co. said its net income fell, demonstrating how fuel-pricing decisions dictate carriers' finances even when their planes are full and fares are rising. American Airlines parent AMR posted a $17 million profit compared with a year-earlier loss as its jet-fuel bill slid 8.5 percent. Southwest's profit dropped 19 percent on a 41 percent jump in fuel spending. Fuel expense rose at Southwest, the most profitable U.S. airline, as contracts for locking in prices also increased.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2006
LONDON -- British and American regulators are investigating major airlines that operate long-distance flights to and from Britain, suspecting that they may have illegally conspired to fix the amounts of fuel surcharges they impose on passengers. Most major carriers flying between the United States and Heathrow, London's main international airport, charge passengers about 35 British pounds ($64) each way in fuel surcharges. The U.S. Department of Justice and Britain's Office of Fair Trade have contacted British Airways, Virgin Atlantic Airways, United Airlines, American Airlines and possibly other carriers in connection with the investigation, which could lead to criminal charges, civil penalties or both.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | September 30, 2005
DALLAS -- Airlines already crumbling under crude oil prices face another major expense: the record-high cost of turning crude into jet fuel. Since hurricanes Katrina and Rita idled much of the Gulf of Mexico's refining capacity, most U.S. airlines have been paying an extra premium to refine or "crack" the oil into kerosene-like jet fuel. In July, before the storms, airlines paid the equivalent of $11 per barrel of crude in addition to the spot price to keep planes aloft. Now the "crack spread" has spiked to nearly $59, meaning it costs nearly as much to refine the jet fuel as it does to buy a barrel of crude.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
Before the jump in energy prices sent airlines to seek tax relief on Capitol Hill and helped push two more of them into bankruptcy court, they for months had relied on an array of old tricks to cut their use of fuel. Some began taxiing on one engine, climbing more steeply, flying higher over turbulence and filling tanks with just what's needed so as not to weigh down the plane. But convinced the fuel squeeze wouldn't end soon, and with a collective thirst for about 19 billion gallons of it a year, many airlines have begun altering not just how their planes fly, but how they look.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2006
LONDON -- British and American regulators are investigating major airlines that operate long-distance flights to and from Britain, suspecting that they may have illegally conspired to fix the amounts of fuel surcharges they impose on passengers. Most major carriers flying between the United States and Heathrow, London's main international airport, charge passengers about 35 British pounds ($64) each way in fuel surcharges. The U.S. Department of Justice and Britain's Office of Fair Trade have contacted British Airways, Virgin Atlantic Airways, United Airlines, American Airlines and possibly other carriers in connection with the investigation, which could lead to criminal charges, civil penalties or both.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1990
Airline travelers and those who pay their bills have watched with alarm this fall as the Persian Gulf crisis seemed to move steadily toward war.The conflict has sent oil prices up, but prices for jet fuel have soared far more than have gasoline prices. That, in turn, has caused not only higher air fares -- they are up an average of almost 18 percent since summer -- but also a financial crisis for the airline industry, which already was experiencing a drop in business because of the economy.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 3, 2005
NEW YORK - U.S. airlines raised fares yesterday as Hurricane Katrina drove jet fuel prices higher and shortened the time that Northwest Airlines Corp. said it has to avoid bankruptcy. UAL Corp.'s United Airlines, the second-largest carrier, raised round-trip fares $10 to $30, depending on the length of the trip, said spokesman David Dimmer. The increase includes leisure, business and international fares. Delta Air Lines Inc., the third-largest U.S. carrier, matched United in several markets, and Delta and Continental Airlines Inc. put in separate round-trip increases of $10 on routes with low-cost carriers, company spokeswomen said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 15, 2005
DALLAS - Southwest Airlines Co., the No. 1 U.S. discount carrier, has joined the nation's biggest airlines in raising fares because of higher fuel prices. Southwest boosted fares $2 to $6 per round trip Friday, spokeswoman Linda Rutherford said yesterday. Bigger rivals AMR Corp.'s American Airlines, Northwest Airlines Corp. and other carriers raised fares $20 Friday, their second such increase in two weeks. Airlines are trying to damp the impact of higher prices for jet fuel, the industry's second-biggest expense after labor.
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