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By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | June 22, 2003
Let's say that Pvt. Jessica Lynch of Palestine, W.Va., is a genuine hero. The young woman recovering at Walter Reed military hospital in Washington from horrific injuries she suffered in Iraq is no Alvin York of World War I fame, nor an Audie Murphy, the most highly decorated soldier of World War II. But any young woman who wants so badly to be a teacher that she joins the Army to get credentials and then goes off to fight for her country in a God-forsaken country...
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By Cynthia Tucker | May 30, 2005
You cannot qualify war in harsher terms than I will. War is cruelty, and you cannot refine it. - Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman ATLANTA - These days, Americans seem to want any war prosecuted by U.S. troops to be pristine - swift, mistake-free, clean. So the U.S. news media decline to show us images of our own dead and wounded. And the Pentagon helpfully distorts or manipulates or conceals facts to cover up unfortunate truths and create romanticized legends. First, there was Pfc. Jessica Lynch - re-created as the brave heroine who emptied her rifle firing at the enemy.
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By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 8, 2003
With The Reagans out of the picture, the remaining network docudramas for November sweeps will run opposite one another and are uncannily similar in approach. Both concern blond American teens, faultless though seemingly one-dimensional: perfect daughters loaded with potential and unburdened by boyfriends or any contemporary problems. One becomes a prisoner of war for nine days; the other is kidnapped for nine months. Both generally keep quiet, endure and are eventually rescued. Both become household names.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | December 13, 2004
ATLANTA - Never underestimate the power of myth. It can solder broken resolve, fuel astounding acts of courage and overwhelm evidence and reason. That's why the U.S. military struggles so hard to create myths to shore up support for its dubious enterprise in Iraq. Pfc. Jessica Lynch - young and blond - seemed to come straight from central casting to play the part of courageous heroine. Only later did we learn that she never fired a shot. Never mind. The myth served its purpose. So has the Bush administration's convoluted explanation for the overthrow of Saddam Hussein.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 30, 2003
It is next to impossible to imagine a story with more potential for sinking into suffocating sentimentality than that of Jessica Lynch -- the 20-year-old U.S. Army private captured in the Iraq war, atrociously abused, then freed in a rescue operation that was initially presented as far more heroic than it actually was. Rick Bragg resigned as a New York Times reporter on May 28 after being suspended with pay for relying heavily, without attribution, on...
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 4, 2003
MARINE COMBAT HEADQUARTERS, Iraq - After watching a fedayeen commander slap Army Pfc. Jessica Lynch twice as she lay wounded in the hospital, an Iraqi tipped off the U.S. Marines about her location, leading to the dramatic rescue of the American POW. "A person, no matter his nationality, is a human being," the man, a 32-year-old lawyer whose wife was a nurse at the hospital, said in an interview at Marines' headquarters, where he, his wife and daughter are...
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 23, 2003
ELIZABETH, W.Va. - She whirled in on a Black Hawk helicopter, addressed throngs of reporters and waved from a military motorcade to the thousands who lined the route to see the little girl from West Virginia-turned-celebrity POW return home. "Hi. Thank you for being here," Pfc. Jessica Lynch said yesterday from a wheelchair, clad in a green Army dress uniform and beret. "It's great to be home. I would like to say thank you to everyone who hoped and prayed for my safe return." In the four months since her unit was ambushed in southern Iraq, Lynch has become one symbol after another for a public grasping to understand the war and its aftermath.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 18, 2003
With the White House and Pentagon facing mounting criticism over their handling of the war in Iraq, what's one more television report attacking their credibility? Perhaps not all that much when measured against the sheer mass of media questions as to whether there really were stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq or efforts by Saddam Hussein's regime to obtain uranium. But War Spin: Jessica Lynch, a British report airing tonight on BBC America, does take allegations that the U.S. government purposefully misled the public to a new level that warrants consideration.
FEATURES
November 11, 2003
Andy Griffith is host and narrator of The Andy Griffith Reunion: Back to Mayberry. Yes, the cast reunited back in the 1986 movie Return to Mayberry), but it seems that the 1960-1968 series still has a gentle hold on its original viewers as well as on many who've caught the constant reruns. This time, Griffith, Ron Howard, Don Knotts and Jim Nabors reunite, and other cast members, including George Lindsey and Betty Lynn, appear in separate interviews. The program airs from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. on CBS (WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 23, 2003
BOSTON - Maybe it's best that Pfc. Jessica Lynch doesn't remember what happened. The doctors say she doesn't recall the ambush and capture, the April days that transformed the private first class into a first-class war hero. So Private Lynch, at least, had no part in the making of the Legend of Private Lynch. When the nonstop coverage began, she was a survivor being carried on a stretcher in and out of planes and hospitals. When producers "took meetings" for TV specials and docudramas, she was having her bones meticulously pinned back together.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2004
In some ways, it is not surprising that the best-known GI Joe from the war in Iraq is named Jessica. That would be Jessica Lynch who was turned into a heroine despite her fervent denials that she deserved such status for being rescued from an Iraqi hospital after being wounded and taken prisoner in the early days of the war. Though Lynch's story resonated in large part because it fit into so many stereotypes - a blond woman in jeopardy - in many ways...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 30, 2003
It is next to impossible to imagine a story with more potential for sinking into suffocating sentimentality than that of Jessica Lynch -- the 20-year-old U.S. Army private captured in the Iraq war, atrociously abused, then freed in a rescue operation that was initially presented as far more heroic than it actually was. Rick Bragg resigned as a New York Times reporter on May 28 after being suspended with pay for relying heavily, without attribution, on...
FEATURES
November 11, 2003
Andy Griffith is host and narrator of The Andy Griffith Reunion: Back to Mayberry. Yes, the cast reunited back in the 1986 movie Return to Mayberry), but it seems that the 1960-1968 series still has a gentle hold on its original viewers as well as on many who've caught the constant reruns. This time, Griffith, Ron Howard, Don Knotts and Jim Nabors reunite, and other cast members, including George Lindsey and Betty Lynn, appear in separate interviews. The program airs from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. on CBS (WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 8, 2003
With The Reagans out of the picture, the remaining network docudramas for November sweeps will run opposite one another and are uncannily similar in approach. Both concern blond American teens, faultless though seemingly one-dimensional: perfect daughters loaded with potential and unburdened by boyfriends or any contemporary problems. One becomes a prisoner of war for nine days; the other is kidnapped for nine months. Both generally keep quiet, endure and are eventually rescued. Both become household names.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 2, 2003
Who knew that they got it all wrong at the Iran-Contra hearings -- the 1987 Senate investigation into the illegal sale of arms to Iran by President Ronald Reagan's administration? Reagan did authorize the sale of arms to Iran during his presidency, but he was tricked into it by aides in a moment of dementia when he couldn't even remember the name of the senior defense adviser to whom he was speaking. Or that all the landmark legislation and deregulation that came to be known as the Reagan Revolution -- a political and social movement that reshaped America (in the opposite direction)
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 23, 2003
ELIZABETH, W.Va. - She whirled in on a Black Hawk helicopter, addressed throngs of reporters and waved from a military motorcade to the thousands who lined the route to see the little girl from West Virginia-turned-celebrity POW return home. "Hi. Thank you for being here," Pfc. Jessica Lynch said yesterday from a wheelchair, clad in a green Army dress uniform and beret. "It's great to be home. I would like to say thank you to everyone who hoped and prayed for my safe return." In the four months since her unit was ambushed in southern Iraq, Lynch has become one symbol after another for a public grasping to understand the war and its aftermath.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2003
PALESTINE, W.Va. - Anything her older brother could do, she could do, too. Baseball. Basketball. Childhood adventures through the hilly green cattle farms and hollows of Appalachia. No matter that she was barely 5 feet 4 and 105 pounds. On July 19, 2001, the spunky little blond girl, as Jessica Lynch is known here, joined the Army, enlisting the very same day as her brother, Greg. Yesterday, Pfc. Greg Lynch Jr., 21, stood on the wraparound porch of the family's white-and-red gingerbread-style farmhouse and pointed to a newspaper lying on his mother's truck.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 2003
PALESTINE, W.Va. - By 6 a.m. yesterday, the scene was pleasantly off-kilter. The old horse was chewing on his breakfast bale, the roosters were testing their vocals, the chickens were enjoying their morning romp, and seven satellite television trucks were amassed on this Appalachian hollow. Deadra Lynch, raised on this beautiful swath of tobacco and cattle farms, hills and streams, was suddenly sprinting out of her wood-frame house and disappearing into one of the TV trucks, emerging later with a beaming smile.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 18, 2003
With the White House and Pentagon facing mounting criticism over their handling of the war in Iraq, what's one more television report attacking their credibility? Perhaps not all that much when measured against the sheer mass of media questions as to whether there really were stockpiles of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq or efforts by Saddam Hussein's regime to obtain uranium. But War Spin: Jessica Lynch, a British report airing tonight on BBC America, does take allegations that the U.S. government purposefully misled the public to a new level that warrants consideration.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 23, 2003
BOSTON - Maybe it's best that Pfc. Jessica Lynch doesn't remember what happened. The doctors say she doesn't recall the ambush and capture, the April days that transformed the private first class into a first-class war hero. So Private Lynch, at least, had no part in the making of the Legend of Private Lynch. When the nonstop coverage began, she was a survivor being carried on a stretcher in and out of planes and hospitals. When producers "took meetings" for TV specials and docudramas, she was having her bones meticulously pinned back together.
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