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Jessica Lange

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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 4, 2008
Jessica Lange recently became an empty-nester. She insists she is not handling it well. "It's not a relief at all," says the 58-year-old actress, who lives in New York with her longtime partner, playwright Sam Shepard, but not with their two children, who are both now on their own. "In fact, I'm totally lost. It has not been an easy transition for me." But could what is bad for Lange prove good news for film fans? Now that she doesn't have a family to raise anymore, will the two-time Oscar-winning actress accelerate the one-film-a-year pace she's been maintaining for much of the past two decades?
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By Zach Sparks | October 24, 2012
Last fall, FX's "American Horror Story" burst onto the scene as one of television's best drama miniseries and was nominated for 17 Emmy Awards. This season, co-creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk flipped the script by changing characters, plotlines and the show's setting from the “Murder House” to the dank and chilling Briarcliff Manor mental asylum. Over the next few weeks b will post Q&As with cast members of "American Horror Story. " First up: Chloe Sevigny ("Big Love," "Boys Don't Cry")
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By The Hartford Courant | October 27, 1992
Earlier this year, as the Broadway revival of "A Streetcar Named Desire" was nearing the end of its run, Jessica Lange told a theater magazine writer she was going to quit acting when the show closed.But it looked as if the 43-year-old actress was still in the middle of the acting business when she met the press recently to promote her co-starring film role with Robert De Niro in "Night and the City."So was she misquoted? Was she having a bad day? Was she serious?"I knew this was going to haunt me," she sighs, smiling.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | March 4, 2008
Jessica Lange recently became an empty-nester. She insists she is not handling it well. "It's not a relief at all," says the 58-year-old actress, who lives in New York with her longtime partner, playwright Sam Shepard, but not with their two children, who are both now on their own. "In fact, I'm totally lost. It has not been an easy transition for me." But could what is bad for Lange prove good news for film fans? Now that she doesn't have a family to raise anymore, will the two-time Oscar-winning actress accelerate the one-film-a-year pace she's been maintaining for much of the past two decades?
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
NEWS
December 14, 2007
FREDDIE FIELDS, 84 Agent, studio executive Freddie Fields, the Hollywood agent, producer and studio executive who helped make stars of Mel Gibson, Richard Gere and others with films such as The Year of Living Dangerously, American Gigolo and Glory, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif., said publicist Warren Cowan, a longtime friend. During a long, colorful career as one of Hollywood's biggest behind-the-scenes players, Mr. Fields founded the international talent agency Creative Management Associates and served as president of two major film studios, MGM and United Artists.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 1997
It's understandable that two of Hollywood's most acclaimed actresses would want their production companies to adapt "A Thousand Acres," Jane Smiley's epic family saga that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1991.The novel, based on "King Lear" with the contemporary twist of being told from the daughters' point of view, lucidly rendered a family's connection to its Iowa farmland, its individual loyalties and betrayals and its collective secret history.This is such stuff as Oscars are made of.Or should be. Jocelyn Moorehouse's filmed adaptation turns out to be a flaccid re-treading of the original work, made watchable only by a ferocious performance from Michelle Pfeiffer and an equally terrifying turn by Jason Robards as an indomitable patriarch coming undone.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 22, 1992
Every time I think life is getting too complicated, I just listen to Dan Quayle and learn how simple-minded it really is.I had been trying to understand the causes of the violence in Los Angeles. Was it just the result of thieves and thugs? Or were there serious underlying social problems?Our vice president has now supplied the answer: Murphy Brown did it.As you probably know, Dan Quayle recently gave a speech blaming the Los Angeles rioting on the breakdown of the American family and the abandonment of traditional values as typified by Murphy Brown "bearing a child alone and calling it just another 'lifestyle choice.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Watching Big Fish brings audiences the lighter-than-air euphoria of seeing a flat expanse of nylon expand into a soaring balloon, but it isn't just one more Tim Burton trip movie. This picture boasts a story about a yarn-spinning Southern father (Albert Finney) and a sober-sided son (Billy Crudup) that gives it ballast and staying power beyond anything in previous, precious Burton fables like Edward Scissorhands or Ed Wood. The central figure is yet another Edward, with the surname Bloom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | April 6, 2003
Thirteen years ago, director Constantin Costa-Gavras (Z) made Music Box, a superb courtroom thriller about a first-generation American lawyer (Jessica Lange) defending her father against charges that he committed atrocities in Hungary, as an Arrow Cross Nazi - a "Special Section" policeman. It was partly about the cynicism of older generations who hate to be reminded of the Holocaust and partly about the ignorance of younger generations who don't know the first thing about it. The director again prods audiences out of their complacency about genocide with Amen.
NEWS
December 14, 2007
FREDDIE FIELDS, 84 Agent, studio executive Freddie Fields, the Hollywood agent, producer and studio executive who helped make stars of Mel Gibson, Richard Gere and others with films such as The Year of Living Dangerously, American Gigolo and Glory, died Tuesday of lung cancer at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif., said publicist Warren Cowan, a longtime friend. During a long, colorful career as one of Hollywood's biggest behind-the-scenes players, Mr. Fields founded the international talent agency Creative Management Associates and served as president of two major film studios, MGM and United Artists.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 19, 2006
Don't Come Knocking presents its audience with an intriguingly dysfunctional family, and a handful of absurdist laughs. But it rarely strikes the right tone and ultimately falls short of what one would expect from a collaboration between director Wim Wenders and writer Sam Shepard. The film begins as yet another look at the shallowness of Hollywood and the relentlessly formulaic product it dumps on an undemanding public (a theme that ought to be retired immediately, lest it become a cliche itself)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 7, 2005
When the original King Kong hit theaters in 1933, it was preceded by a special issue of The Hollywood Reporter and accompanied by the nervous prayers of RKO Radio executives, fearful the movie might be the last their nearly bankrupt studio would ever release. With a box-office take of more than $1.2 million, the movie saved RKO, and Kong himself went on to became a cinematic icon. When producer Dino De Laurentiis remade King Kong in 1976, advance word suggested the film was another masterpiece.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | July 21, 2005
SINCE THIS IS a full-service column dedicated to helping the reader at all times, I'm going to do you a huge favor today. I'm going to recommend two books to take to the beach this summer. And here's a guarantee: these will be the two best books you've ever read at the beach, period. These books are so good, you won't be able to put them down. You'll spend the whole day in your little beach chair reading, and when you finally finish, it'll be dusk and the only people around will be a couple of old guys in undershirts and Bermuda shorts with those stupid metal detectors.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 7, 2004
Bay Theatre Company will start its third season tomorrow with the opening of Beth Henley's Pulitzer Prize-winning dark comedy Crimes of the Heart - the company's sixth play to date and fourth in its own playhouse. Bay Theatre co-founders Lucinda Merry-Brown and Janet Luby have accomplished much since their first offering, Christopher Durang's Beyond Therapy, opened in December 2002. They are well on their way to achieving their stated goal of "building a community of artists who work together to produce great theater."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Watching Big Fish brings audiences the lighter-than-air euphoria of seeing a flat expanse of nylon expand into a soaring balloon, but it isn't just one more Tim Burton trip movie. This picture boasts a story about a yarn-spinning Southern father (Albert Finney) and a sober-sided son (Billy Crudup) that gives it ballast and staying power beyond anything in previous, precious Burton fables like Edward Scissorhands or Ed Wood. The central figure is yet another Edward, with the surname Bloom.
NEWS
By Janet Cawley and Janet Cawley,Chicago Tribune | October 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- The Lion's Head, the venerable Greenwich Village saloon long known for nurturing writers and artists, where Jessica Lange once waited tables, where Rod Steiger got his mail and where the Clancy Brothers provided free entertainment, may be facing its own last call.The bar's owners, Wes and Judy Joice, owe some $250,000 in back state and federal sales taxes. And unless they come up with a satisfactory investor before an Oct. 20 appearance in federal bankruptcy court, the Head -- as it's universally known -- could close permanently.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 7, 2005
When the original King Kong hit theaters in 1933, it was preceded by a special issue of The Hollywood Reporter and accompanied by the nervous prayers of RKO Radio executives, fearful the movie might be the last their nearly bankrupt studio would ever release. With a box-office take of more than $1.2 million, the movie saved RKO, and Kong himself went on to became a cinematic icon. When producer Dino De Laurentiis remade King Kong in 1976, advance word suggested the film was another masterpiece.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | April 6, 2003
Thirteen years ago, director Constantin Costa-Gavras (Z) made Music Box, a superb courtroom thriller about a first-generation American lawyer (Jessica Lange) defending her father against charges that he committed atrocities in Hungary, as an Arrow Cross Nazi - a "Special Section" policeman. It was partly about the cynicism of older generations who hate to be reminded of the Holocaust and partly about the ignorance of younger generations who don't know the first thing about it. The director again prods audiences out of their complacency about genocide with Amen.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 1997
It's understandable that two of Hollywood's most acclaimed actresses would want their production companies to adapt "A Thousand Acres," Jane Smiley's epic family saga that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1991.The novel, based on "King Lear" with the contemporary twist of being told from the daughters' point of view, lucidly rendered a family's connection to its Iowa farmland, its individual loyalties and betrayals and its collective secret history.This is such stuff as Oscars are made of.Or should be. Jocelyn Moorehouse's filmed adaptation turns out to be a flaccid re-treading of the original work, made watchable only by a ferocious performance from Michelle Pfeiffer and an equally terrifying turn by Jason Robards as an indomitable patriarch coming undone.
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