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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TV CRITIC | May 22, 1999
Jesse Ventura looks into the camera and says, "I like to call wrestling a ballet of violence."That's what passes for a message, insight or truth in this two-bit, cut-and-paste made-for-TV movie about the life of the wrestler-turned-governor of Minnesota airing tomorrow night from 9 to 11 on NBC.Well, there's also this: "Pain is good. Extreme pain is extremely good." Or how about, "nothing is forever"? Beyond the fact that "The Jesse Ventura Story" celebrates violence, it also includes what is hands-down the worst narrative device of the television season -- having the actor playing Ventura (Nils Allen Stewart)
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NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | June 26, 2008
I was at a playground with my daughter the other day, reading The Two Kinds of Decay by Sarah Manguso (good book) and watching my girl as she stood at the perimeter of children playing and studied them, exactly as I did when I was a kid, working up the nerve to plunge into the fray. She is braver than I - she plunges. I tended to retreat and have been backpedaling ever since. I was sitting on a bench in the shade with the nannies and mommies, most of them on cell phones, talking about problem men, problem cleaning ladies, problem mothers, and the woman sitting next to me got up to go see to her child, and then stopped and came back and got her purse out of the stroller and took it with her. I was offended.
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
They talked for three hours over Chinese take-out. The hosts' children romped about, with no hired help in sight. Ad man Bill Hillsman, "just some schmo from Minneapolis," hung out last week in Los Angeles "talking about some stuff" with none other than actor Warren Beatty.Beatty, a telegenic 62 years of age, has become the celebrity wild card in the 2000 presidential race by hinting he might run for the White House."After 35 years of liberal activism as a Democrat, I am being urged by some people to spend 40 years of fame on a presidential campaign," Beatty wrote Aug. 22 in the New York Times.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2004
HAWTHORNE, Calif. - If the polls are right, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is about to score the biggest victory of his young administration in Tuesday's California primary. His name isn't on the ballot, but his reputation is. The Republican is campaigning hard for passage of a $15 billion bond measure described as the largest ever to appear on any ballot in any state. Schwarzenegger is using a potent combination of star power and scare tactics to persuade California voters to approve the measure, Proposition 57, and a companion, Proposition 58. In TV commercials, the governor pushes the measures as the solution to the state's budget mess.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 11, 1998
Quitter Newt keeps the faith with House Republican colleagues he had misled, while breaking it with constituents who re-elected him.Jesse Ventura may yet prove to be a clown governor, but he's already a better talking head than any in Washington.The king has no pants: It turns out that Bawlamerns don't need Larry and Hizzoner to organize them to vote.PBFrank Wren got the Orioles job because he already was a bird.,Cheer up. Parris is back.Pub Date: 11/11/98
NEWS
By Michael Feldman | January 7, 1999
Enough of Jesse Ventura. Why? 1. Navy seals? Aren't they the guys who swim with explosives tied to their rears? 2. He already broke his promise to rappel down the state capitol. (On the plus side, he did dance around the big menorah with the Lubovitch brotherhood.)Rumors have surfaced that something that occurred over the Renaissance weekend on Hil- ton Head will result in the expansion of independent counsel Kenneth Starr's probe.Congress will ask President Clinton to delay the State of the Union address until the ides of March, and to deliver it from the steps of the Senate, where there would be, uh, more room.
NEWS
November 6, 1998
An excerpt of a Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial published yesterday: JESSE Ventura, master of self-transformation, is now Jesse Ventura, governor-elect of Minnesota. He won the prize in Tuesday's election with a pledge to remake state government into a smaller, less taxing force in people's lives.Before he can hope to succeed, Mr. Ventura must remake himself once again. His only chance of accomplishing his goal lies in winning the cooperation of the very government establishment he lambasted during the campaign.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Well, I guess Jesse Ventura won't be running for president after all. His decision against seeking re-election as governor of Minnesota as a third-party candidate no doubt takes care of that bit of fanciful speculation. There was a time when the former-professional-wrestler-turned-statesman was being mentioned as the next standard-bearer for the Reform Party, launched by another pipe-dreamer, Ross Perot, in 1992 and shattered by the wrecking ball of Pat Buchanan in 2000. But Mr. Ventura eventually broke with the Reform Party, and after early cooperation with the Democrats who controlled the state Senate and the Republicans who ran the state House, he eventually hit a brick wall.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 5, 2001
OH ... MY ... GOD. Did you see it? Did you watch the debut of the XFL, the new smash-mouth football league that is the unholy offspring of Vince McMahon's World Wrestling Federation and NBC? Was that unreal or what? Let's see, here's a few things I jotted down in the old notebook while watching Saturday night's nationally-televised game between the New York/New Jersey Hitmen - say, there's a wholesome nickname - and Las Vegas Outlaws: big hits, cleavage, deafening rock music, cleavage, trash-talking, cleavage, dizzying camera angles, cleavage, goofy on-field interviews after big plays, cleavage.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Angry voters - the people who brought America Ross Perot, Newt Gingrich and Jesse Ventura - are back. At least in California. The big question is whether they are resurging enough to throw out other governors or shape the coming presidential election. Angry voters turned California politics upside down Tuesday. Their passion against a litany of local woes and a distinctly unlovable governor fueled their historic decision to fire Gray Davis and replace him with a Hollywood hero who is untested in politics.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Angry voters - the people who brought America Ross Perot, Newt Gingrich and Jesse Ventura - are back. At least in California. The big question is whether they are resurging enough to throw out other governors or shape the coming presidential election. Angry voters turned California politics upside down Tuesday. Their passion against a litany of local woes and a distinctly unlovable governor fueled their historic decision to fire Gray Davis and replace him with a Hollywood hero who is untested in politics.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
Evidence that California no longer occupies the special place it once held in the American psyche can be found in the state's declining suicide rate. Two decades ago, Californians committed suicide at a rate 50 percent higher than the rest of the country. The explanation was that California was the end of the line for those searching for the frontier that was so central to the American character. People seeking that elusive goal just beyond the horizon could go no further. So, they ended the journey.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Well, I guess Jesse Ventura won't be running for president after all. His decision against seeking re-election as governor of Minnesota as a third-party candidate no doubt takes care of that bit of fanciful speculation. There was a time when the former-professional-wrestler-turned-statesman was being mentioned as the next standard-bearer for the Reform Party, launched by another pipe-dreamer, Ross Perot, in 1992 and shattered by the wrecking ball of Pat Buchanan in 2000. But Mr. Ventura eventually broke with the Reform Party, and after early cooperation with the Democrats who controlled the state Senate and the Republicans who ran the state House, he eventually hit a brick wall.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 11, 2001
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Independent Gov. Jesse Ventura, facing a governmental shutdown over a budget dispute with the divided Minnesota legislature, sat behind his massive desk at the state capitol the other day and in effect dared his adversaries to pull a Newt Gingrich. The governor was referring to the 1995 federal shutdown, when the then -House speaker defiantly let President Bill Clinton proceed with cutting government services rather than yield in their budget fight. Mr. Clinton successfully placed the blame on Mr. Gingrich and the Republican-controlled Congress, and Mr. Ventura clearly believes he can do the same to his recalcitrant legislature, especially the Democrats who control the state Senate.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | February 5, 2001
OH ... MY ... GOD. Did you see it? Did you watch the debut of the XFL, the new smash-mouth football league that is the unholy offspring of Vince McMahon's World Wrestling Federation and NBC? Was that unreal or what? Let's see, here's a few things I jotted down in the old notebook while watching Saturday night's nationally-televised game between the New York/New Jersey Hitmen - say, there's a wholesome nickname - and Las Vegas Outlaws: big hits, cleavage, deafening rock music, cleavage, trash-talking, cleavage, dizzying camera angles, cleavage, goofy on-field interviews after big plays, cleavage.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 29, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Democrat Paul Wellstone of Minnesota came to the Senate 10 years ago as a kind of "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" --a young and starry-eyed citizen politician bent on bringing integrity along with old-fashioned liberal principles to Capitol Hill. At the time, term limits were in fashion and many candidates were running on a pledge to serve only a specific number of terms. Mr. Wellstone didn't make such a pledge, but upon election he volunteered not to serve more than two six-year Senate terms.
FEATURES
By Kay Harvey and Kay Harvey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 12, 1999
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- After her husband was elected governor, Terry Ventura's home phone rang 100 times a day and the transition team took over her dining room. To lighten things up, she occasionally donned a rhinestone tiara -- a gift from one of her horse-riding students -- and announce, "You must worship me now."Terry Ventura didn't go to college, travel in political circles or prep to be Minnesota's first lady. But she is easing into her role the way she has tackled most of her life -- with good humor, common sense, hard work and a stand-by-your-man philosophy.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 14, 1999
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- Lenin said that any cook can run the state. The wrestler running this one believes, as Lenin did not, what Lenin said.Jesse Ventura, a human Vesuvius who does not believe in hoarding himself, has Minnesota so well in hand he has time to give interviews promiscuously -- 25 a week, he says.Nowadays these include interviews to tidy up after interviews, such as the one in Playboy wherein he said organized religion is for the weak-minded (such as Mrs. Ventura, he later explained)
FEATURES
October 8, 1999
Reagan's son says bio gets it mostly rightAt least one person close to Ronald Reagan thinks the much-maligned biography about the former president is right on the money.In his first public remarks about "Dutch: A Memoir of Ronald Reagan," the ex-president's son, Ron Prescott Reagan, tells Lesley Stahl that he thinks author Edmund Morris "was as fair as anybody ever has been to my father." The interview will be broadcast on CBS' "60 Minutes" Sunday.Reagan does disagree on one aspect of the book.
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