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By Rric Barrow and Rric Barrow,New York Daily News | February 27, 2007
NEW YORK -- On Aug. 9, 1936, Jesse Owens ran the first leg of the 400 relay at the Berlin Olympics, a race that would lead to the last of his four gold medals in Germany. On Aug. 16, the final day of those Games, Owens was suspended by the Amateur Athletic Union for refusing to take part in the last leg of the cash-grab tour through Europe put on by the AAU and the U.S. Olympic Committee. Owens wasn't paid for his exhibition stops in Cologne, Germany, Prague or London, and was so strapped for cash that he would bum meals off fellow passengers.
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By Rric Barrow and Rric Barrow,New York Daily News | February 27, 2007
NEW YORK -- On Aug. 9, 1936, Jesse Owens ran the first leg of the 400 relay at the Berlin Olympics, a race that would lead to the last of his four gold medals in Germany. On Aug. 16, the final day of those Games, Owens was suspended by the Amateur Athletic Union for refusing to take part in the last leg of the cash-grab tour through Europe put on by the AAU and the U.S. Olympic Committee. Owens wasn't paid for his exhibition stops in Cologne, Germany, Prague or London, and was so strapped for cash that he would bum meals off fellow passengers.
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NEWS
By Hans Knight | July 28, 1996
IT SEEMS A LITTLE silly now, 60 years later, but it felt right at the time, even glorious, and it still warms my heart thinking about it. There we were, a bunch of impeccably white Austrian kids, running through the Vienna woods, faces smeared with itchy black show polish, intermittently yelling, "Oo-Eas-Ah."Adults who saw us did double takes. Some smiled tolerantly, others touched forefingers to frowning brows. We didn't care.This was 1936, and in far-off Berlin, they were holding the Olympic Games.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2004
John H. Higgins, the longtime director of aquatics and swimming coach at the Naval Academy who had been a member of the 1936 U.S. Olympic swimming team, died of pneumonia Aug. 1 at his Annapolis home. He was 88. Mr. Higgins, who was a longtime leader in international, national and Naval Academy swimming, diving and water polo, was born and raised in Providence, R.I. It was a childhood bout with whooping cough at the age of 4 that resulted in his becoming a swimmer. "The doctor advised his parents that he be taken to a place where there was plenty of fresh air, sunshine and saltwater, so they bought a summer house at Apanog, near Warwick, Rhode Island," said his daughter, Joan Graham of Annapolis.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Are aliens visiting Earth and having their way with us? Watch "Nova" and decide for yourself.* " 'The Wizard of Oz' on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Oksana Baiul as Dorothy and Viktor Petrenko as the Scarecrow highlight this frozen version of the classic children's book and beloved MGM film. With ice skating already showing up just about everywhere on television, can a 24-hour-a-day, all-skating cable channel be far behind? CBS.* "Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This analytic, but still creepy, look at people who insist they've been abducted and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by aliens should get you thinking.
FEATURES
By Erika Young | July 12, 1992
With the 1992 Summer Olympics fast approaching I picture myself standing in the host city, breathing the salty air from the Mediterranean Sea, listening to church bells toll and proud Spaniards shouting, "Saludo, Saludo -- Welcome to Barcelona!"Many flags will be at the Olympic stadium for the first time: those of countries that only recently have won their independence. Missing will be the flags of the Soviet Union, East Germany and other former communist countries.Instead of witnessing the thrilling events in person, I can only dream about them with the help of the newspaper and television, or console myself with these words from a song by Franz Lehar: "Happy is he who forgets what he cannot change."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 15, 2000
John Taylor has a message. In fact, he has many messages, and his alter ego, KinderMan - dressed in bow tie, red suspenders and bowler hat - is the means of delivery. "We teach through rhymes and raps I've created," says Taylor, host of the Emmy Award-winning children's show "KinderTime," which runs on ABC Saturday mornings at 8. Taylor also travels the country preaching positive thoughts to children and families using the arts as his tools. Shows such as "KinderCise" promote learning through movement, using chants and dances to stimulate the mind.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Michele DeJuliis scored nine of her game-high 16 points in the third quarter to lead No. 14 Loch Raven to a comeback 47-42 victory over No. 16 Towson in a Baltimore County Class 2A-1A contest last night at Towson.Loch Raven (4-0 overall, 2-0 league) trailed by 13 at halftime after hitting just four of 32 shots. But they pulled ahead in the third quarter with nearly 50 percent shooting and a fiesty man-to-man defense.The Raiders outscored Towson 21-6 in the third quarter. The Raiders hit five of their first six shots in the second half and got a two-point bonus when one of the Generals scored a follow shot in the wrong basket.
SPORTS
By William C. Rhoden and William C. Rhoden,New York Times News Service | March 1, 1992
Who is Carl Lewis, really?Is he the comet with the flattop haircut? Or the high-flying meteor with a ponytail and dreadlocks?The other night, Lewis' head was shaved bald."
SPORTS
By Bob Herzog and Bob Herzog,NEWSDAY | April 21, 1996
As part of the countdown to the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, a chronological look at past Olympiads is appearing each Sunday. Jesse Owens. Adolf Hitler. It was the best of times and it was the worst of times in Berlin for the 1936 Summer Olympics.The Games had been awarded to Germany in 1931, before Hitler and his Nazi party had come to power. By '36, the anti-Semitic and racist policies of the Third Reich had sparked numerous protests and calls for a boycott of the Games. But USOC president Avery Brundage urged participation and, in a close vote, the U.S. team decided to attend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 15, 2000
John Taylor has a message. In fact, he has many messages, and his alter ego, KinderMan - dressed in bow tie, red suspenders and bowler hat - is the means of delivery. "We teach through rhymes and raps I've created," says Taylor, host of the Emmy Award-winning children's show "KinderTime," which runs on ABC Saturday mornings at 8. Taylor also travels the country preaching positive thoughts to children and families using the arts as his tools. Shows such as "KinderCise" promote learning through movement, using chants and dances to stimulate the mind.
SPORTS
January 2, 2000
Thorpe was the greatest The ESPN and Associated Press polls that rated the greatest athletes of the century were heavily weighted to athletes competing over the second half of the century. This is understandable since the second half was the age of television, and the exposure of these athletes was so much greater. Furthermore, many of the panel members probably are not even aware of the exploits of the great athletes of the first half. The most prominent of these is Jim Thorpe, who in 1950 was selected by the AP as the greatest male athlete (ahead of Babe Ruth, Jack Dempsey and Ty Cobb)
NEWS
By Hans Knight | July 28, 1996
IT SEEMS A LITTLE silly now, 60 years later, but it felt right at the time, even glorious, and it still warms my heart thinking about it. There we were, a bunch of impeccably white Austrian kids, running through the Vienna woods, faces smeared with itchy black show polish, intermittently yelling, "Oo-Eas-Ah."Adults who saw us did double takes. Some smiled tolerantly, others touched forefingers to frowning brows. We didn't care.This was 1936, and in far-off Berlin, they were holding the Olympic Games.
SPORTS
By Bob Herzog and Bob Herzog,NEWSDAY | April 21, 1996
As part of the countdown to the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, a chronological look at past Olympiads is appearing each Sunday. Jesse Owens. Adolf Hitler. It was the best of times and it was the worst of times in Berlin for the 1936 Summer Olympics.The Games had been awarded to Germany in 1931, before Hitler and his Nazi party had come to power. By '36, the anti-Semitic and racist policies of the Third Reich had sparked numerous protests and calls for a boycott of the Games. But USOC president Avery Brundage urged participation and, in a close vote, the U.S. team decided to attend.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Are aliens visiting Earth and having their way with us? Watch "Nova" and decide for yourself.* " 'The Wizard of Oz' on Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Oksana Baiul as Dorothy and Viktor Petrenko as the Scarecrow highlight this frozen version of the classic children's book and beloved MGM film. With ice skating already showing up just about everywhere on television, can a 24-hour-a-day, all-skating cable channel be far behind? CBS.* "Nova" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- This analytic, but still creepy, look at people who insist they've been abducted and, in some cases, sexually assaulted by aliens should get you thinking.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 12, 1996
It seems, as Tony Danza tells it, that the rich and the famous are not so very different from you and me.They get geeked up over being around famous athletes, and that's why so many entertainers sign on for duty as presenters for the ESPY awards, which are handed out tonight at New York's Radio City Music Hall (8 o'clock, ESPN)."It's kind of the melding of sports and entertainment. It's a different mix. It's why the Golden Globes are so much fun, because everybody's there," said Danza, who will be host for this year's show, the fourth of its kind.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | February 12, 1996
It seems, as Tony Danza tells it, that the rich and the famous are not so very different from you and me.They get geeked up over being around famous athletes, and that's why so many entertainers sign on for duty as presenters for the ESPY awards, which are handed out tonight at New York's Radio City Music Hall (8 o'clock, ESPN)."It's kind of the melding of sports and entertainment. It's a different mix. It's why the Golden Globes are so much fun, because everybody's there," said Danza, who will be host for this year's show, the fourth of its kind.
SPORTS
January 2, 2000
Thorpe was the greatest The ESPN and Associated Press polls that rated the greatest athletes of the century were heavily weighted to athletes competing over the second half of the century. This is understandable since the second half was the age of television, and the exposure of these athletes was so much greater. Furthermore, many of the panel members probably are not even aware of the exploits of the great athletes of the first half. The most prominent of these is Jim Thorpe, who in 1950 was selected by the AP as the greatest male athlete (ahead of Babe Ruth, Jack Dempsey and Ty Cobb)
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Michele DeJuliis scored nine of her game-high 16 points in the third quarter to lead No. 14 Loch Raven to a comeback 47-42 victory over No. 16 Towson in a Baltimore County Class 2A-1A contest last night at Towson.Loch Raven (4-0 overall, 2-0 league) trailed by 13 at halftime after hitting just four of 32 shots. But they pulled ahead in the third quarter with nearly 50 percent shooting and a fiesty man-to-man defense.The Raiders outscored Towson 21-6 in the third quarter. The Raiders hit five of their first six shots in the second half and got a two-point bonus when one of the Generals scored a follow shot in the wrong basket.
FEATURES
By Erika Young | July 12, 1992
With the 1992 Summer Olympics fast approaching I picture myself standing in the host city, breathing the salty air from the Mediterranean Sea, listening to church bells toll and proud Spaniards shouting, "Saludo, Saludo -- Welcome to Barcelona!"Many flags will be at the Olympic stadium for the first time: those of countries that only recently have won their independence. Missing will be the flags of the Soviet Union, East Germany and other former communist countries.Instead of witnessing the thrilling events in person, I can only dream about them with the help of the newspaper and television, or console myself with these words from a song by Franz Lehar: "Happy is he who forgets what he cannot change."
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