Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJesse James
IN THE NEWS

Jesse James

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 26, 2006
On Monday, April 24, 2006, JESSE JAMES HOWARD, SR., of Oldtown, Maryland and formerly of Howard County, Maryland, beloved husband of Marian R. Howard. Also survived by 12 children, 43 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren, one brother and five sisters. Friends may call 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Wednesday, April 26 at Molesworth-Williams P.A. Funeral Home, 26401 Ridge Road, Damascus, Maryland, where funeral services will be held Thursday, April 27 at 10:00 A.M. Interment will be in Crestlawn Memorial Gardens, Marriottsville, Maryland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
"Just because you shot Jesse James does not make you Jesse James," Mike tells Walt late in "Hazard Pay", shooting him back to earth and, at the same, antagonizing Walt to do something stupid. The power struggle between the somehow noble Mike and ego-maniac Walt/Heisenberg continued in the third episode of "Breaking Bad's" fifth season. When Mike lays down the parameters and responsibilities of the new team in Saul's office, he assumes the role as the company's alpha male.  "I handle the business," he says sternly.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
The pistol used to kill outlaw Jesse James in 1882 is scheduled for auction next month in England. But a Carroll County man says the revolver was stolen 25 years ago from his late father -- and he wants it back.Henry A. Lingenfelder of Manchester said his eyes popped yesterday when he read in The Sun that the Smith & Wesson .44-caliber revolver, Serial No. 3766, was being offered for sale by an anonymous American vendor through Wallis & Wallis of Lewes, Sussex, and is expected to fetch at least $150,000.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Trezevant P. "Ted" Yeatman, author of the critically acclaimed biography "Frank and Jesse James: The Story Behind the Legend," died Nov. 1 of respiratory and cardiac failure at Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park. The College Park resident was 57. Born and raised in Nashville, Tenn., Mr. Yeatman was a 1970 graduate of the Peabody Demonstration School and earned a bachelor's degree from George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University in 1977. He also earned a master's degree in library science, also from Peabody, in 1977, and a paralegal certificate from George Washington University in 1993.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 19, 1996
That was Jesse James buried face down in Jesse James' grave in Kearney, Mo. No doubt about it. He was 34 years old when he died from a single bullet to the head April 3, 1882. At HTC the time, James had tobacco-stained teeth, long hair dyed darker that its natural chestnut (possibly in an attempt at disguise), a .36-caliber bullet lodged in his rib cage (probably fired from a Union officer's Navy Colt at the end of the Civil War)and, while ole Jess might have been addicted to painkillers, he probably didn't do dope for at least three months prior to his death.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
An English auction house is making a mistake if it insists on selling the pistol used to kill outlaw Jesse James knowing that it is stolen property, the man from whose museum the gun was stolen in 1968 said yesterday.The .44-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver, Serial No. 3766, was on loan from the late Henry G. Lingenfelder of Towson to Richard Hahn's Jesse James Museum in Sullivan, Mo., when the break-in occurred during a severe summer storm.Edmund Greenwood, a spokesman for Wallis & Wallis, an auctioneer in Lewes, Sussex, said plans to sell the revolver would proceed despite yesterday's report in The Sun about the theft.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
The American selling the pistol used to kill outlaw Jesse James claims the son of the man from whom the gun was stolen in 1968 expressed no interest in the weapon when contacted by a friend of the seller several years ago, an English auctioneer said yesterday.Henry A. Lingenfelder, the son in question, has a different recollection."If he told them that, he's a lying SOB," said Mr. Lingenfelder of Carroll County. He said the claim makes him even more determined to recover the .44-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver, which is scheduled for sale April 28 and could fetch more than $150,000.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Scotland Yard has asked an English auctioneer to withdraw the revolver used to kill outlaw Jesse James from a planned April 28 sale at which it was expected to fetch at least $150,000.The .44-caliber Smith & Wesson, owned by the late Henry G. Lingenfelder of Towson, was stolen in 1968 from a museum in Missouri to which he had lent it for display.Det. Sgt. Tony Russell, of the Scotland Yard Art and Antiques Squad, said yesterday that he spoke with auctioneer Roy Butler, senior partner at Wallis & Wallis in Sussex, and will confer with him again early next week as the investigation proceeds.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 12, 2007
Early on, local audiences may feel the thrill of anticipation when they hear the narrator of this sprawling Western say, "Alexander Frank James was in Baltimore with his wife and child when he read the news about the assassination of Jesse James." But even though Sam Shepard lends his cryptic, windbeaten visage and a fine, dry delivery to Frank James (Jesse's brother), he never enters the picture again after we hear those words. The line occurs on Page 348 of Ron Hansen's engrossing novel.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Trezevant P. "Ted" Yeatman, author of the critically acclaimed biography "Frank and Jesse James: The Story Behind the Legend," died Nov. 1 of respiratory and cardiac failure at Washington Adventist Hospital in Takoma Park. The College Park resident was 57. Born and raised in Nashville, Tenn., Mr. Yeatman was a 1970 graduate of the Peabody Demonstration School and earned a bachelor's degree from George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University in 1977. He also earned a master's degree in library science, also from Peabody, in 1977, and a paralegal certificate from George Washington University in 1993.
FEATURES
October 26, 2007
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimoresun .com/movies. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford -- As Jesse James (Brad Pitt) nears the end of the line at age 34, his idolatrous and jealous fan, Bob Ford (Casey Affleck), sees him as his ticket to glory. The writer-director, Andrew Dominik, acts less like a filmmaker than a Dictaphone, pillaging Ron Hansen's novel for period argot and scene-setting narration rather than shaping dramatically charged scenes; he's got a childlike notion of "tell me a story" moviemaking, and, alas, a child's skill at it. (M.S.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 12, 2007
Early on, local audiences may feel the thrill of anticipation when they hear the narrator of this sprawling Western say, "Alexander Frank James was in Baltimore with his wife and child when he read the news about the assassination of Jesse James." But even though Sam Shepard lends his cryptic, windbeaten visage and a fine, dry delivery to Frank James (Jesse's brother), he never enters the picture again after we hear those words. The line occurs on Page 348 of Ron Hansen's engrossing novel.
FEATURES
September 3, 2007
Brad Pitt and his partner, Angelina Jolie, are ready for another child, the actor said yesterday as he was promoting his new film. He did not indicate whether they planned another biological child or if they would adopt. Pitt and Jolie, with children in tow, were in Venice, Italy, to talk about his film on Western outlaw Jesse James, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Asked by Italian state TV whether they were ready for a fifth, Pitt replied: "Yeah we're ready."
NEWS
March 10, 2007
Bill Chinnock, a musician and founding member of what became Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, died Wednesday, police said in Yarmouth, Maine. He was 59. Mr. Chinnock, a blues and roots rock stylist, had Lyme disease, and police said they were called to his East Main Street home by his live-in caregiver. Lt. Dean Perry would not comment on the cause of death but said "it is not of a suspicious nature." Mr. Chinnock's manager, Paul Pappas, told WCSH-TV that the guitarist, keyboardist, singer and songwriter committed suicide.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
On Monday, April 24, 2006, JESSE JAMES HOWARD, SR., of Oldtown, Maryland and formerly of Howard County, Maryland, beloved husband of Marian R. Howard. Also survived by 12 children, 43 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren, one brother and five sisters. Friends may call 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Wednesday, April 26 at Molesworth-Williams P.A. Funeral Home, 26401 Ridge Road, Damascus, Maryland, where funeral services will be held Thursday, April 27 at 10:00 A.M. Interment will be in Crestlawn Memorial Gardens, Marriottsville, Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Michael Kennedy and J. Michael Kennedy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2001
JOE NICKELL calls them "time capsules," these rare opportunities to explore the mysteries of the past. He is a sleuth of history, a man who uses everything from a knowledge of ancient inks to carbon dating in order to answer questions about long-ago events. Nickell, who has written a book about historical mysteries, once put together a research team that concluded that a diary purportedly penned by Jack the Ripper was bogus. He has come down on the side of research that shows the Shroud of Turin is a 13th-century fake.
NEWS
March 10, 2007
Bill Chinnock, a musician and founding member of what became Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, died Wednesday, police said in Yarmouth, Maine. He was 59. Mr. Chinnock, a blues and roots rock stylist, had Lyme disease, and police said they were called to his East Main Street home by his live-in caregiver. Lt. Dean Perry would not comment on the cause of death but said "it is not of a suspicious nature." Mr. Chinnock's manager, Paul Pappas, told WCSH-TV that the guitarist, keyboardist, singer and songwriter committed suicide.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
In a prelude to formal legal action, a Towson lawyer yesterday asked an English auctioneer to cancel the April 28 sale of the pistol used to kill outlaw Jesse James and hold it until legal ownership can be established.The .44-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver, No. 3766, was allegedly stolen in 1968 from a Jesse James Museum in Sullivan, Mo. The owner, the late Henry G. Lingenfelder, of Towson, had lent the gun for exhibition.On behalf of the owner's son, Henry A. Lingenfelder of Carroll County, and with the approval of the Firemen's Fund Insurance Company, which paid the $9,000 claim, Robert L. Preller, the lawyer, wrote Wallis & Wallis, the English auctioneer, asking that the sale be canceled.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 17, 2001
Let's all shed a tear for the Western, a once-mighty Hollywood genre now relegated to the cinematic scrap heap. You think I'm overstating the case? Then go see American Outlaws, and consider that this hackneyed, overly cute, derivative film is probably the only Western American audiences will be exposed to this year. For a genre that used to be about something - adventure, honor, myth, the pioneering spirit, man vs. nature, the clash of civilizations - that's a sad statement, indeed. American Outlaws is about dressing up a bunch of pretty young people in spurs and bonnets and letting them smile for the camera.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
About the only misleading thing about "A Dog of Flanders" is the title, since the dog is only nominally important to the plot. Everything else about this movie is as subtle as a cinder block crashing on your head. The protagonists, a boy, his grandfather and their beautiful dog, a Bouvier des Flanders, aren't just poor, they're impoverished. And their struggles aren't just formidable, they're as big as those windmills that dot the Belgian countryside. Of course, the villain is an utter cad who evicts the poor (on Christmas, no less)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.