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By Vito Stellino | December 1, 1990
The Washington Redskins had a special visitor at practice yesterday -- the Rev. Jesse Jackson.Jackson was invited by his friend Bobby Mitchell, the Redskins' assistant general manager and a Hall of Fame player.After practice, Jackson talked to the players about their responsibilities as role models and public figures to perform community service and cooperate with members of the media.All the players practiced for tomorrow's game against the Miami Dolphins.
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NEWS
August 24, 2014
The recent article regarding the Federal Hill stabbing and the neighborhood's complaints of a dearth of information regarding the incident should have mentioned The Sun as part of the problem ( "Neighbors question lack of information after stabbing in Federal Hill," Aug. 19). If this had been a bunch of white thugs beating up a black kid in Ruxton, this would have been in Monday's paper with a completely different tenor - like outrage and call for social justice - and we would have had the race industry folks (the Revs.
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NEWS
April 22, 1991
The Democratic Leadership Council holds its first convention next month in Cleveland. Jesse Jackson and George McGovern will not be there -- at least not as speakers. DLC Executive Director Al From said they were not invited to speak because, "We are trying to change the party, and Jackson and McGovern represent. . . old-style politics. . . the ideological approach to government we are trying to change." A Jackson aide characterized it as a "heavy slight." Mr. Jackson wrote several DLC leaders asking if Mr. From "was speaking on your behalf, too?"
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Activists fighting a state plan to build a new $70 million juvenile detention facility in Baltimore received some high-profile backing Thursday night, as the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson joined their cause. "We must revive the war on poverty tonight, not the war on the poor," the prominent civil rights activist and Baptist minister said before a crowd of more than 200 people who gathered in Baltimore's War Memorial Building to rally against the state plan. Jackson said that with thousands of vacant homes degrading neighborhoods and unemployment leaving families unstable, Gov. Martin O'Malley could better serve the city and its youth by reallocating the jail funding to jobs programs, community initiatives and neighborhood redevelopment.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | October 3, 1990
"The Jesse Jackson Show" debuted in more than 125 cities across the country last weekend, but not in Baltimore and Washington.WMAR-TV (Channel 2) did not carry the syndicated show because attorneys told the station that Jackson's candidacy for the "shadow Senate seat" in the District of Columbia would create complications for the station under the equal time provision, according to Emily Barr, director of broadcast operations at Channel 2.Equal Time provisions essentially dictate that air time given one candidate during a given pre-election period must be offered to all candidates for that office.
NEWS
November 8, 1991
Jesse Jackson's announcement that he will not enter the Democratic presidential primaries in 1992 is probably good news for at least two announced candidates, for the party in general and for black Democrats.We say "probably" because Mr. Jackson described his decision as "a pit stop to get new tires and overhaul our motor. We're going to come back faster and stronger than ever before." The word is that he will not put the pedal back to the metal before 1996, but we can imagine a 1992 scenario in which he is an active candidate.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 19, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* They asked the same things once about rock 'n' roll, boogie-woogie and ragtime, so why should rap music be any different?"Is hip hop music educating or eroding young minds?" That's the scheduled issue of this weekend's edition of the "Jesse Jackson" show (at midnight Sunday, Channel 2).Among the guests are performers Big Daddy Kane, Young M.C., Chuck D. and Sister Souljah of Public Enemy, as well as editors of The Source, a rap magazine.* Also on the rap scene, the MTV cable network this month has brought out the first of its "YO!
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1996
"Jesse: The Life and Pilgrimage of Jesse Jackson," by Marshall Frady. Random House. 552 pages. $27.50.In 1984, when African-American politicians finally felt like they had some clout with the Democratic Party leadership, Jesse Jackson threatened to spoil it all by running for president.Prominent black Democrats didn't want to support Jackson, but they couldn't afford to offend the oratorical heir to Martin Luther King Jr.Thus it was that when Jackson brought his campaign to Birmingham, Ala., for a rally, the first black mayor of the city infamous for its segregated past showed up for a bear hug from Jesse even though he had endorsed Walter Mondale.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 7, 1993
Just before Bill Clinton was to enter Oriole Park on Monday, he was supposed to make a little side trip.Clinton was to get off the MARC train, shake a few hands, join Kurt Schmoke, and then both of them were supposed to walk over and visit with Jesse Jackson.Jackson was picketing outside the ballpark to get major league baseball to employ more blacks and women in executive positions.The meeting between Clinton and Jackson never took place, however.Clinton later told reporters he thought Jackson's protest was "fine", but Clinton never went over to give Jackson what Jackson wanted: one more moment in the spotlight.
NEWS
By Andrew Blankstein, Rong-Gong Lin II, Harriet Ryan and Scott Gold and Andrew Blankstein, Rong-Gong Lin II, Harriet Ryan and Scott Gold,Tribune Newspapers | June 28, 2009
LOS ANGELES - - Los Angeles police completed an "extensive interview" Saturday night with the doctor who was with Michael Jackson when the pop star went into cardiac arrest, and a source close to the investigation said detectives found "no red flag" during discussions about the death. A private pathologist, meanwhile, conducted a second autopsy on Jackson's body, hours after it was released to relatives by the Los Angeles County coroner. Coroner's officials had said that Jackson had been using prescription drugs, and the investigation is focused on whether Jackson overdosed.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 2008
One of the most fascinating aspects of Sen. Barack Obama's electric popularity is how eagerly, like a Rorschach ink-blot test, people see in him whatever they want to see. To some folks, for example, he isn't just running for president; he's running for the post of America's top black leader. In this spirit, some conservatives, in particular, can't wait to bum rush the current crop of media-anointed black leaders out the door. "The big losers, two big losers tonight are probably Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton," George Will observed after the Illinois senator swept the Iowa Democratic caucuses last week.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
Seth Fawcett, a senior at Wilde Lake High School, probably never thought that he would meet the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, let alone use the back of the civil rights leader to fill out a voter registration card. Yesterday, Seth, a lanky 17-year-old Columbia resident, found himself on the school's auditorium stage with close to 200 classmates who were inspired to register to vote after an hourlong speech in which Jackson included messages of racial tolerance, academic achievement and the avoidance of violence.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
On Oct. 16, 1995, hundreds of thousands of African-American men from around the nation poured into Washington, D.C., in search of spiritual renewal and fraternal strength. As they stood together on the Mall, basking in the autumn sun, the men of the Million Man March pledged to take responsibility for their actions, to serve their families and their communities, and to improve themselves and the world in which they lived. Kurt Schmoke, then mayor of Baltimore, brought his 24-year-old stepson.
NEWS
March 30, 2005
NATIONAL A strong defense of Title IX A girls basketball coach who complained that his players got shabbier treatment than the boys team -- and then found himself benched -- can sue for retaliation, the Supreme Court said yesterday in a case that expands the protections of a landmark gender-equity law. [Page 1a] School shooting probe widens A coordinated attack on targets beyond a Minnesota high school campus might have been planned by the shooter and others, a source familiar with the federal investigation said yesterday, but any plot to strike more targets fizzled when the other students either backed out or didn't take the scheme seriously.
NEWS
By Hal Dardick and Hal Dardick,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 28, 2005
Pop star Michael Jackson again declared yesterday that he is innocent of child molestation charges and suggested he's the victim of a conspiracy involving the valuable music copyrights he owns. For strength in the face of the criminal charges, he looks to the stories of oppressed black men, including South African anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela, Jackson said. "Please be patient and be with me and believe in me, because I am completely, completely innocent," Jackson said to his fans in an often-sympathetic live radio interview conducted by the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson.
NEWS
By DAVID SHRIBMAN | December 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jesse Jackson has a new revolutionary program that would shake America to its far extremities. It would change life as we know it. This revolutionary manifesto has five parts. It has no chance of becoming reality. It is too extreme.The first principle is that parents should take their children to school. The second is that parents should meet their children's teachers. The third is that the parents and the teachers should exchange home telephone numbers. The fourth is that the parents should pick up their children's report cards.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 8, 2005
YOU HAVE TO hand it to that Jesse Jackson: A dull guy, he ain't. Jackson was this year's keynote speaker at Johns Hopkins' 23rd annual Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration yesterday. For most of his one-hour speech, he was the perfect man for the job. He preached. He taught. He scolded -- mostly conservatives, Republicans and the Bush administration. He cautioned his listeners not to focus so much on King's dream but on "the broken promise of the U.S. government that inspired the dream and made it necessary."
TOPIC
By Jonathan Tilove and Jonathan Tilove,NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2004
BOSTON - In coming years, last week's Democratic National Convention in Boston may be seen as a signal moment in the changing of the guard of the nation's black political leadership. It was the last act of the Rev. Al Sharpton's failed bid to grab the mantle long held by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and the debut star turn of Barack Obama, the state senator from Chicago who is the odds-on favorite to become only the third black person in the U.S. Senate since Reconstruction - and someone already being talked about for a future national ticket.
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