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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
We left you last year with a plea for peace Hoping beyond hope for calm on our streets Cops say crime's dropping at a steady pace City officials ask, did you find your "happy place?" • Baltimore's top cop Bealefeld certainly found his A new prosecutor to help fight the crime biz The commish put a campaign sign in front of his house Now he's finally got his dream crime-fighting spouse. • Jessamy claimed to be "tough and smart on crime" Voters saw her as too timid and ended her time The image of criminals mimicking the Wild West Helped Bernstein with his slogan of being Eliot Ness.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
While many others on the ballot battled butterflies Tuesday, political newcomer Gregg Bernstein — the shoo-in candidate for Baltimore state's attorney — was relatively relaxed. His fight was over after the September primary, when he bested the city's longtime prosecutor, Patricia C. Jessamy, to win the Democratic nomination by a margin of just under 1,200 votes. He was unopposed in the general election. "From an anxiety-level standpoint, it's certainly a lot … calmer today," Bernstein, 55, said on the morning of Election Day. He was planning a quiet dinner out Tuesday night to celebrate with his wife, Sheryl Goldstein, who recently returned to her job directing the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice after taking a leave of absence during the campaign.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
A Baltimore jury convicted two young men and acquitted another of murder Friday in the death of former City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr., who was killed two years ago after he and a woman stopped by a jazz club to borrow a corkscrew as the facility was about to be robbed. Jerome Williams, 17, and Charles McGaney, 22, were each found guilty on 28 counts, including felony first-degree murder, assault, handgun, and robbery charges. Gary Collins, 22, was acquitted of murder but found guilty on all of the other charges.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
Political newcomer Gregg Bernstein drew support across racial boundaries to unseat a longtime incumbent in this year's contentious — and close — primary election for Baltimore state's attorney, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of precinct-level data released this week. Bernstein, a white defense lawyer who campaigned with a tough-on-crime message, earned most of the city's white vote, particularly in areas like Canton, where he had strong support. Results also show that he took a significant portion of the black vote — up to a third of it in some African-American neighborhoods — to defeat fellow Democrat Patricia C. Jessamy, a black woman who has been Baltimore's top prosecutor for 15 years.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | September 23, 2010
A few hundred miles from Baltimore, a law school student learned last week that Gregg Bernstein upset Pat Jessamy in the Democratic primary for Baltimore state's attorney. That result gave some long-delayed comfort to this woman we came to know as she battled Baltimore officialdom in the wake of her husband's brutal murder. Her name is Anna Sowers. Her husband, Zach Sowers, was beaten into a nine-month-long coma in a street robbery a few steps from the couple's Patterson Park home on the night of June 2, 2007.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2010
A big sigh of relief emanated from the Baltimore Police Department's headquarters on East Fayette Street this week. After 15 years, to hear the cops tell it, their suffering has ended. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is out and Gregg Bernstein is in. Baltimore's electorate put an end to the relentless backbiting, feuding and name-calling between the top prosecutor and a succession of six police commissioners over whom to blame for botched cases and repeat offenders. Inept police or a timid state's attorney?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
They're Baltimore's lost citizens. Arrested, jailed, released. Arrested, jailed, released. Arrested, jailed released. Drugs. Theft. Drugs Loitering. Drugs. Breaking into cars. Drugs. An occasional assault, but usually nothing too violent. They cycle through Central Booking — the first stop in their familiar odyssey through the city's tortuous criminal justice system — as if the temporary holding cells were merely roadside motels that charge by the hour. These are not the "bad guys with guns," nor are they the murderers or the shooters or the rapists.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
I can't help it, I'm a political rubbernecker. Although there was plenty of electoral action here, I've been watching aghast but unable to avert my eyes from the Republican primary election train wreck next door in Delaware. Surely you, too, have followed the story of the tea party princess who slew the evil establishment dude to become the GOP nominee for U.S. Senate. Christine O'Donnell, a red-jacketed, bespectacled Sarah Palin wannabe, trounced Rep. Mike Castle, a reliable moderate in what used to be a reliably moderate state, in what surely must be a new electoral low: a campaign that apparently revolved around whether Castle needed to put on, as she so daintily phrased it, his man-pants.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Defendant after shackled defendant rises before the judge, who in the space of mere minutes determines that this one will remain in jail to await trial, or that one will get sprung on bail. Despite the variety of charges that landed them here — assault with hot soup or a shard of glass, stalking by Facebook, the garden-variety disorderly conducts and destructions of property — they soon become a nearly undistinguishable line of sleepy, mostly silent men and women whose cases are not so much heard as processed.
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