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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
I can't help it, I'm a political rubbernecker. Although there was plenty of electoral action here, I've been watching aghast but unable to avert my eyes from the Republican primary election train wreck next door in Delaware. Surely you, too, have followed the story of the tea party princess who slew the evil establishment dude to become the GOP nominee for U.S. Senate. Christine O'Donnell, a red-jacketed, bespectacled Sarah Palin wannabe, trounced Rep. Mike Castle, a reliable moderate in what used to be a reliably moderate state, in what surely must be a new electoral low: a campaign that apparently revolved around whether Castle needed to put on, as she so daintily phrased it, his man-pants.
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NEWS
September 17, 2010
As Don Meredith (former quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys and Monday Night Football analyst) used to say, "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas. " Patricia Jessamy apologists complain that, but for Sheryl Lansey's entry into the race for Baltimore City state's attorney, Ms. Jessamy would have been re-elected ("3rd-place finisher doesn't mind being called a 'spoiler,'" Sept. 17). Applying that dubious rationale, Bill Clinton would still be chasing skirts in Arkansas and Hillary Clinton would still be practicing law in Little Rock and making tons of money as an astute commodities trader if not for H. Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Patricia C. Jessamy, the longtime Baltimore prosecutor who has insisted that treatment and intervention programs were as important in fighting crime as courtroom trials, acknowledged Friday that she lost her re-election bid to a challenger who promised to get tougher on the city's most dangerous criminals. Jessamy's concession came a day after a set of absentee ballots were counted, widening slightly the lead held by attorney Gregg Bernstein to 1,363 votes out of 60,000 cast. Despite raising questions earlier in the week about the accuracy of the count, her legal team, which is reviewing the voting results, is not expected to fight the outcome.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
In the weeks leading up to Tuesday's contentious primary election for Baltimore state's attorney, Margaret T. Burns deferred questions about her boss' re-election bid to a spokeswoman hired by the campaign. Burns earns about $100,000 a year to speak on behalf of Jessamy and her prosecutors, usually about convictions and cases won in court. During the primary race, the city's top prosecutor maintained a separate Web page and Facebook page for the campaign, signals that office work and political work shouldn't mix. But on Wednesday, Burns took center stage in Jessamy's bid to retain her office.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Patricia Jessamy's legal team is scrutinizing the results of the Baltimore state's attorney's race as challenger Gregg Bernstein's lead widened Thursday after the first round of absentee ballots were counted. Jessamy's lawyers sent letters to both state and city election officials Thursday asking for: •a complete list of the voting machines used in the primary election, a guarantee that the vote verification process will be conducted in public, the election judges' manual and copies of the written procedures for handling voting information at the polling sites as well as for transporting it to the elections board.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2010
As many as 10,000 of Baltimore's primary votes could still be missing, according to Patricia Jessamy's state's attorney campaign staff, who told her that memory cards from 27 machines in six districts were unaccounted for. If accurate, it could leave room for the election to sway back toward Jessamy, the incumbent, who's narrowly trailing challenger Gregg Bernstein. But city Board of Elections Director Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said the figures sounded high to him, and that none of it would matter by the end of the day. "We are going to get to 100 percent" of the votes cast at polling places, he said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2010
Baltimore State's Attorney hopeful Gregg Bernstein maintained his lead over incumbent Patricia C. Jessamy, according to a full count of the votes cast in city polling places. Numbers released this afternoon from the Baltimore Board of Elections show that Bernstein won 49 percent of the primary votes cast at polling places to Jessamy's 47 percent -- with just 1,295 votes separating them. (A third democratic candidate received about 2,000 votes). That means Jessamy needs to make up the difference in absentee ballots, which will be counted starting Thursday morning, or Baltimore has a new state's attorney.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
When the question came during the debate — and how could it not, given the Canton locale — Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy started her answer on the defensive. Without "blaming anyone else," an audience member asked, what happened in the Zach Sowers case? Sowers was a newlywed in 2007 when teenagers attacked and robbed him — one boy beating him into a coma steps from his Patterson Park home. He died 10 months later, the case saddening and then infuriating the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
Standing before television cameras and reporters on 26th Street on a steamy summer day, Gregg Bernstein displays a strong command of campaign skills in his first bid for elected office. He was a late entry in the contest against Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, who has held the job for 15 years. But he's got the art of the news conference down. The checklist: slick suit, media handlers and provocative statements. He has called everyone there to blame Jessamy for one of the city's senseless murders, the high-profile killing of a young Johns Hopkins researcher, Stephen Pitcairn, allegedly at the hands of a career criminal.
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